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Special Issue "GIS Crime Mapping"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2008).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Spencer Chainey
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University College London Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science, 35 Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9EZ, England
Interests: crime analysis; problem-oriented policing; hot spot policing; intelligence-led policing

Keywords

  • GIS Crime Mapping

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Crime Scene Reconstruction Using a Fully Geomatic Approach
Sensors 2008, 8(10), 6280-6302; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/s8106280 - 08 Oct 2008
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 10978
Abstract
This paper is focused on two main topics: crime scene reconstruction, based on a geomatic approach, and crime scene analysis, through GIS based procedures. According to the experience of the authors in performing forensic analysis for real cases, the aforesaid topics will be [...] Read more.
This paper is focused on two main topics: crime scene reconstruction, based on a geomatic approach, and crime scene analysis, through GIS based procedures. According to the experience of the authors in performing forensic analysis for real cases, the aforesaid topics will be examined with the specific goal of verifying the relationship of human walk paths at a crime scene with blood patterns on the floor. In order to perform such analyses, the availability of pictures taken by first aiders is mandatory, since they provide information about the crime scene before items are moved or interfered with. Generally, those pictures are affected by large geometric distortions, thus - after a brief description of the geomatic techniques suitable for the acquisition of reference data (total station surveying, photogrammetry and laser scanning) - it will be shown the developed methodology, based on photogrammetric algorithms, aimed at calibrating, georeferencing and mosaicking the available images acquired on the scene. The crime scene analysis is based on a collection of GIS functionalities for simulating human walk movements and creating a statistically significant sample. The developed GIS software component will be described in detail, showing how the analysis of this statistical sample of simulated human walks allows to rigorously define the probability of performing a certain walk path without touching the bloodstains on the floor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Crime Mapping)
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