Special Issue "Challenges for the Development of Sustainable Smart Cities"

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511). This special issue belongs to the section "Internet of Things".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fernando De la Prieta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Alfonso González-Briones
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computer Science and Automation Control, Universidad de Salamanca, Calle Espejo s/n, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: artificial intelligence; machine learning; IoT; smart cities; blockchain
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart cities have transformed how citizens relate to their environment and their city. Technology and the increasingly powerful connection offered by the Internet, as well as the generation and interpretation of data (big data), makes cities optimize their consumption, which translates into taking better care of the environment and reducing pollution.

Sensorization has played a fundamental role in the collection of data, which, once analyzed in IoT and smart cities platforms, has allowed for the optimization of multiple decisions in terms of governance and the optimization of resource consumption. This has also been the case with the integration and development of open data portals or research in techniques of artificial intelligence such as blockchain, edge computing/fog computing-based systems, IoT, and big data.

This Special Issue is devoted to promoting the investigation of the latest research in IoT and smart cities and their effective applications, to explore the latest innovations in guidelines, theories, models, ideas, technologies, applications, and tools to assess the impact of the approach, and to facilitate technology transfer.

The topics of interest for this Issue include but are not limited to the following:

  • Smart cities challenges;
  • Smart home and smart buildings;
  • Open data and big data analytics;
  • Smart health and emergency management;
  • Smart environments;
  • Smart manufacturing and logistics;
  • Industry 4.0;
  • Virtual organizations of agents;
  • Human–machine interactions;
  • Artificial intelligence;
  • Industrial internet of things;
  • Machine learning;
  • Multi agents;
  • Advanced building simulation;
  • Energy and climate policy;
  • Sustainable waste management.

Dr. Fernando De la Prieta Pintado
Dr. Alfonso González-Briones
Dr. Pablo Chamoso Santos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart cities
  • IoT
  • smart mobility
  • smart data
  • smart cities challenges
  • e-governance

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Article
Technological Developments of Mobility in Smart Cities. An Economic Approach
Smart Cities 2021, 4(3), 971-978; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities4030050 - 06 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 810
Abstract
This article introduces the concern that exists in the wider economic world concerning the developments carried out in Smart Cities. The various studies that have been developed capture the economic approach by focusing on specific economic development theories. This article initially provides a [...] Read more.
This article introduces the concern that exists in the wider economic world concerning the developments carried out in Smart Cities. The various studies that have been developed capture the economic approach by focusing on specific economic development theories. This article initially provides a theoretical response to the need for a joint approach to the different economic theories relating to Smart Cities, placing the bases of their development in the circular economy. Subsequently, the paper presents a device-based proposal to validate the sustainability principles indicated in the Smart Economy, focusing exclusively on the areas of health and mobility. As a whole, the work concludes with the need to incorporate sustainability criteria into economic ambition so that technological developments have a place in future Smart Cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges for the Development of Sustainable Smart Cities)
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Article
Mobile Networks and Internet of Things Infrastructures to Characterize Smart Human Mobility
Smart Cities 2021, 4(2), 894-918; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities4020046 - 10 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 883
Abstract
The evolution of Mobile Networks and Internet of Things (IoT) architectures allows one to rethink the way smart cities infrastructures are designed and managed, and solve a number of problems in terms of human mobility. The territories that adopt the sensoring era can [...] Read more.
The evolution of Mobile Networks and Internet of Things (IoT) architectures allows one to rethink the way smart cities infrastructures are designed and managed, and solve a number of problems in terms of human mobility. The territories that adopt the sensoring era can take advantage of this disruptive technology to improve the quality of mobility of their citizens and the rationalization of their resources. However, with this rapid development of smart terminals and infrastructures, as well as the proliferation of diversified applications, even current networks may not be able to completely meet quickly rising human mobility demands. Thus, they are facing many challenges and to cope with these challenges, different standards and projects have been proposed so far. Accordingly, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been utilized as a new paradigm for the design and optimization of mobile networks with a high level of intelligence. The objective of this work is to identify and discuss the challenges of mobile networks, alongside IoT and AI, to characterize smart human mobility and to discuss some workable solutions to these challenges. Finally, based on this discussion, we propose paths for future smart human mobility researches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges for the Development of Sustainable Smart Cities)
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Article
Sustainable and Reliable Information and Communication Technology for Resilient Smart Cities
Smart Cities 2021, 4(1), 156-176; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities4010009 - 14 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1465
Abstract
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is at the heart of the smart city approach, which constitutes the next level of cities’ and communities’ development across the globe. Thereby, ICT serves as the gluing component enabling different domains to interact with each other and [...] Read more.
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is at the heart of the smart city approach, which constitutes the next level of cities’ and communities’ development across the globe. Thereby, ICT serves as the gluing component enabling different domains to interact with each other and facilitating the management and processing of vast amounts of data and information towards intelligently steering the cities’ infrastructure and processes, engaging the citizens and facilitating new services and applications in various aspects of urban life—e.g., supply chains, mobility, transportation, energy, citizens’ participation, public safety, interactions between citizens and the public administration, water management, parking and many other cases and domains. Hence, given the fundamental role of ICT in cities in the near future, it is of paramount importance to lay the ground for a sustainable and reliable ICT infrastructure, which can enable a city/community to respond in a resilient way to upcoming challenges, whilst increasing the quality of life for its citizens. A structured way of providing and maintaining an open and resilient ICT backbone for a city/community is constituted by the concept of an Open Urban Platform. Therefore, the current article presents the activities and developments necessary to achieve a resilient, standardized smart city, based on Open Urban Platforms (OUP) and the way these serve as a blueprint for each city/community towards the establishment of a sustainable and resilient ICT backbone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges for the Development of Sustainable Smart Cities)
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Perspective
Regarding Smart Cities in China, the North and Emerging Economies—One Size Does Not Fit All
Smart Cities 2020, 3(2), 186-201; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3020011 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1715
Abstract
This article explores the significance of the “Smart city” concept by reviewing its key components, namely: Internet of Things (IoT), big (urban) data, and urban informatics/analytics, which are discussed against the background of two ongoing trends impacting everyone in the world—the Fourth Paradigm [...] Read more.
This article explores the significance of the “Smart city” concept by reviewing its key components, namely: Internet of Things (IoT), big (urban) data, and urban informatics/analytics, which are discussed against the background of two ongoing trends impacting everyone in the world—the Fourth Paradigm (the digital revolution) and rapid urbanization. China is seen as a great success story in the sense of how urbanization has driven a significant improvement in the economic wellbeing and prosperity of many of its citizens. Chinese expansion has come at a cost, and the question remains concerning the sustainability of the Chinese model. Along with this, the article suggests some of the short comings of the components of the Smart city concept and reflects on the human resource skills that will be required to implement Smart cities in the north. This is contrasted with the piecemeal way in which elements of the Smart city are being implemented in emerging economies. A process that very much seems to reflect fundamental technical and capacity issues that may hinder any blanket application of the Smart city in the emerging economies for a long time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges for the Development of Sustainable Smart Cities)
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