Special Issue "mHealth in Smart Cities"

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Luis G Jaimes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Florida Polytechnic University, Department of Computer Science, 4700 Research Way, Lakeland, FL 33805, United States
Interests: mobile health; cyberphysical systems; crowdsensing; social networks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several factors are driving a slow but steady shift in medicine. At present, doctors and hospitals are at the center of health care. Optimistically, people visit the doctor maybe once per year, where they receive expert advice, treatments, and action plans, all within a short 10–15 min meeting with the doctor. Afterward, the patient goes back to their normal daily life and the doctor moves on to the next patient. New trends in health care technology such real-time health interventions (RTHIs) mitigate these limitations by supporting treatments in naturalistic environments—namely, anywhere, and at any time. RTHI systems use wearable sensors and intelligent models for recognizing physical and mental conditions, as well as mechanisms to determine the intervention, the timing, and the dose that maximize the effectiveness of the treatment. In this context, an intervention to support an RTHI system for the treatment of obesity would recognize long periods of sedentarism and recommend physical activity; it could suggest some dietary changes based on prescribed calories, and it also could trigger an alert when the GPS shows the patient is heading to the location of their favorite fast food restaurant.

However, the application of RTHIs in health care is not as rosy as it initially appears, because it usually takes a great deal of patience, dedication, and persistence to alter a long-established behavior pattern. For example, a recent study showed that about 70% of people who acquire wearable devices like Fitbit abandon its use after a few weeks. From an intervention design perspective, it takes a huge investment and cooperation between people from diverse disciplines to successfully implement and deploy effective interventions. A key element for the successful deployment of RTHI systems is patient adherence to interventions or treatment plans.

In this Special Issue we want to explore the use of incentive mechanisms designed to enhance patient adherence to health interventions. We want explore the elements of incentive mechanism design that may be suitable for improving adherence and compliance. We also want to explore the extent to which general-purpose incentive mechanisms may be useful for improving these treatment metrics. Other topics included in this Special Issue include the role of participatory techniques such as crowdsourcing, crowdsensing, and social networks in improving the patient’s probability of successfully self-managing the prescribed interventions.

Dr. Luis G James
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cyber-physical systems
  • Real-time interventions
  • Incentive mechanism design
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Crowdsensing
  • Social networks

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Smart Facility Management: Future Healthcare Organization through Indoor Positioning Systems in the Light of Enterprise BIM
Smart Cities 2020, 3(3), 793-805; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities3030040 - 01 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
Synthesizing the Internet of Things (IoT) with building information modeling (BIM) can improve the performance of the data collection. In this regard, BIM endeavors to enable real-time monitoring conditions of buildings. This paper is focused on the indoor positioning system (IPS) as a [...] Read more.
Synthesizing the Internet of Things (IoT) with building information modeling (BIM) can improve the performance of the data collection. In this regard, BIM endeavors to enable real-time monitoring conditions of buildings. This paper is focused on the indoor positioning system (IPS) as a key enabling technology for IoT applications, which uses smart and non-smart mobile devices (object tags and beacons) with the aim of positioning and objects tracking that lead to a smart approach in the field of facility management (FM). Hence, we have surveyed the joint use of IPS and BIM in FM based on the concept of enterprise BIM (EBIM). EBIM forms the basis for the future strategic real estate management using virtual models and open standards. As a result, we gained the ability to collect positioning data continuously, save them in a BIM database, and present them on two-dimensional (2D) maps. This is a part of an ongoing study that aims to use data collection effectively for FM as an organizational function in large and complex buildings. Hence, for this purpose, we have considered St. Olavs Hospital, one of the biggest healthcare centers in Norway, as a case study. The effectiveness of data collection by IoT devices installed in buildings and how the combination of BIM and IoT technology can support a holistic view of the status of the buildings, which subsequently can enhance data usage efficiency and FM development, will be demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue mHealth in Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research

Letter
Miniaturized Pervasive Sensors for Indoor Health Monitoring in Smart Cities
Smart Cities 2021, 4(1), 146-155; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/smartcities4010008 - 10 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1331
Abstract
Sensors and electronics technologies are pivotal in several fields of science and engineering, especially in automation, industry and environment monitoring. Over the years, there have been continuous changes and advancements in design and miniaturization of sensors with the growth of their application areas. [...] Read more.
Sensors and electronics technologies are pivotal in several fields of science and engineering, especially in automation, industry and environment monitoring. Over the years, there have been continuous changes and advancements in design and miniaturization of sensors with the growth of their application areas. Challenges have arisen in the deployment, fabrication and calibration of modern sensors. Therefore, although the usage of sensors has greatly helped improving the quality of life, especially through their employment in many IoT (Internet of Things) applications, some threats and safety issues still remain unaddressed. In this paper, a brief review focusing on pervasive sensors used for health and indoor environment monitoring is given. Examples of technology advancements in air, water and radioactivity are discussed. This bird’s eye view suggests that solid-state pervasive sensors have become essential parts of all emerging applications related to monitoring of health and safety. Miniaturization, in combination with gamification approaches and machine learning techniques for processing large amounts of captured data, can successfully address and solve many issues of massive deployment. The development paradigm of Smart Cities should include both indoor and outdoor scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue mHealth in Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop