Special Issue "Families, Work and Well-being"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Deborah Stienstra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director of the Live Work Well Research Centre/ Jarislowsky Chair in Families and Work, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: disability studies, public policy analysis, intersectionality, gender/feminist analysis, indigenousness; childhood and disability; end of life care; health policy; resource development policy; political economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite manuscript submissions for a special issue exploring the interconnections between and among diverse forms of families, challenges as a result of changing forms of work and livelihoods, and how these affect individual’s, families’ and communities’ well-being. This special issue invites authors to begin from the perspectives of those who have often been at the margins in discussions of families and work.  In particular, we invite submissions that explore:

-experiences of changes in caregiving by those often identified as care recipients (people with disabilities, young carers) and implications of changes in caregiving over the life course;

-implications of precarious work among young people, their families and those from racialized communities;

-how sexual and gender diversity can challenge employee benefits, working conditions and policies, and work itself;

-examples of how other forms of livelihoods (or obtaining the means to sustain life through barter, artistry, berry-picking etc.) challenge, contradict and/or support paid work;

-how diverse cultural understandings of families, work and well-being, including Indigenous approaches, challenge and expand current work-family research;

-how changing communities as a result of climate change, resource extraction and other factors alter the ways we understand work, families and well-being

Prof. Deborah Stienstra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Dependence on Interprovincial Migrant Labour in Atlantic Canadian Communities: The Role of the Alberta Economy
Societies 2020, 10(1), 11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc10010011 - 19 Jan 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1176
Abstract
(1) Background: In the face of persistent and chronically weak labour markets, Atlantic Canada has become increasingly dependent on mobile oil work in Northern Alberta for employment and income. In the regions, most intensely engaged in this form of employment, mobile oil work [...] Read more.
(1) Background: In the face of persistent and chronically weak labour markets, Atlantic Canada has become increasingly dependent on mobile oil work in Northern Alberta for employment and income. In the regions, most intensely engaged in this form of employment, mobile oil work has largely replaced the dominant industries of the previous century. This geographic shift in Canadian investment and production has created uneven labour markets, with high demand for labour in the Northern Alberta and high unemployment in de-industrialized communities in Atlantic Canada. (2) Methods: There is little quantitative evidence on the flows of mobile workers from the East to the West and the impact of this movement on the Atlantic Canadian economy. Data for this paper were obtained through a special arrangement with Statistics Canada in the fall of 2015 and winter of 2016, from the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD). (3) Results: Analysis of CEEDD revealed that the oil and gas industry of Northern Alberta has a significant impact on the economies of Atlantic Canada with an increasing dependence for interprovincial workers. (4) Conclusions: To the extent that mobile work has served as a replacement for traditional industries, mobile work is re-structuring the social and economic makeup of Atlantic Canadian communities. The more reliant Atlantic Canadian communities become on oil-related mobile work, the more precarious their economies will become as global markets for oil and gas change and targeted actions on climate change increase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Families, Work and Well-being)
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Article
Disabled Families: The Impacts of Disability and Care on Family Labour and Poverty in Rural Guatemala
Societies 2019, 9(4), 76; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc9040076 - 08 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1464
Abstract
An increasing body of literature has started to look at how disability impacts and shifts poverty in the global South in and through a range of areas, including health, education, and livelihoods. However, much of this research is limited to disabled individuals, while [...] Read more.
An increasing body of literature has started to look at how disability impacts and shifts poverty in the global South in and through a range of areas, including health, education, and livelihoods. However, much of this research is limited to disabled individuals, while qualitative research focusing on and articulating the circumstances, needs and demands of rural families remains scarce, especially research focusing on Latin America. This paper reports on a qualitative study looking at how disability affects family labouring patterns in rural Guatemala, with a special focus on women carers of people with acquired physical impairments, in the bid to contribute to a more inclusive understanding of the disability and poverty relationship and its gendered dimensions. Findings highlight how in rural communities already living in dire poverty, the fragmentation of labour input of the disabled person, costs (notably health care) and intensified collective poverty, push fragile families with no safety nets into a set of dynamic responses in the bid to ensure survival of the family unit. These include harder and longer work patterns, interruption of paid labour, and/or induction into exploitative and perilous labour, not only for women, but also children. These responses are erosive and have severe personal, social, cultural and economic consequences, strengthening a deep, multidimensional, chronic and intergenerational impoverishment, transforming these families into ‘disabled families’, among the poorest of the poor. This paper concludes that research, policy and services need to move beyond the disabled individual to understand and address the needs and demands of whole families, notably women, and safeguard their livelihoods, because ultimately, these are the units that singlehandedly care for and ensure the well-being and survival of disabled people. It is also within these units that disability is constructed, shaped, and can ultimately be understood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Families, Work and Well-being)
Article
Assessment of How House Ownership Shapes Health Outcomes in Urban Ghana
Societies 2019, 9(2), 43; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc9020043 - 30 May 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1253
Abstract
Background: This study investigates home ownership and its apparent health outcomes in Urban Ghana, utilizing both quantitative and qualitative datasets. Methods: The sample for the study consisted of 442 respondents using a multi-stage sampling technique. Results: The context in which houses are situated [...] Read more.
Background: This study investigates home ownership and its apparent health outcomes in Urban Ghana, utilizing both quantitative and qualitative datasets. Methods: The sample for the study consisted of 442 respondents using a multi-stage sampling technique. Results: The context in which houses are situated affects social support networks, physical and mental health outcomes. House ownership is then a precondition that enables social contact within neighborhoods. A Cramer’s V test value of 0.750 suggests a strong association between house ownership and health outcomes. Conclusion: House acquisition and ownership can potentially improve overall physical, and mental health and wellbeing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Families, Work and Well-being)
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Concept Paper
Disabilities and Livelihoods: Rethinking a Conceptual Framework
Societies 2019, 9(4), 67; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc9040067 - 26 Sep 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1798
Abstract
Livelihoods, or the means to secure the necessities of life, shape how we live as individuals, families and communities, and our sense of well-being. While discussions of livelihoods have influenced academic discussions and government actions in international development over the past 25 years, [...] Read more.
Livelihoods, or the means to secure the necessities of life, shape how we live as individuals, families and communities, and our sense of well-being. While discussions of livelihoods have influenced academic discussions and government actions in international development over the past 25 years, few have discussed the implications of a livelihoods approach for people with disabilities in the context of global Northern societies. This paper argues that by using a livelihoods approach, we can recognize the multiple and, at times, conflicting ways that people with disabilities sustain themselves and secure the necessities of life. A livelihoods approach recognizes the agency of individuals, including those with disabilities, in the context of their relationships in households, families and communities, while also identifying the systemic barriers, inequalities and opportunities that shape livelihood choices. Using this approach, we argue, will enable a better understanding of how people with disabilities both survive and thrive, the diverse livelihood choices they make and the implications these choices have for policy decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Families, Work and Well-being)
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