Special Issue "Challenges of Post-COVID-19 for a Sustainable Development Society"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sandro Serpa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Sociology, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of The Azores, 9500-321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
2. Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences – CICS.UAc/ CICS.NOVA.UAc, 9500-321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
3. Interdisciplinary Centre for Childhood and Adolescence – NICA – UAc, 9500-321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
Interests: teaching sociology; sociology of education; sociology of organizations; Society 5.0; scientific communication
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Carlos Miguel Ferreira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences-CICS.NOVA, 1069-061 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Estoril Higher Institute for Tourism and Hotel Studies, 1069-061 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: social sciences; arts and humanities
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

When the COVID-19 pandemic started, one of the hymns of hope was the song “Andrà tutto bene” (Everything will be all right), composed by Cristovam (https://www.publico.pt/2020/09/29/impar/
noticia/milhao-mortos-vai-ficar-bem-cristovam-acredita-sim-1933339
). To watch the video of this song, please access https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUZIp_PKeZ0.

Currently (December 16, 2020), it is clear that the COVID-19 pandemic generated a huge convulsion at the micro, meso and macrosocial levels, with a profound influence at the individual, social, economic, political, educational and health levels, among other dimensions, in a real global crisis, with people all over the world dying and becoming infected: 71,919,725 confirmed cases, 1,623,064 confirmed deaths in 220 countries, areas or territories with cases (https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019).

Although there is already a vaccine for the coronavirus, there are still doubts and reservations, both about its effectiveness in practice and about the processes of acquisition and vaccination of the population worldwide.

We deem it pertinent to question whether everything “will be all right”, inasmuch that the impacts of the pandemic are multiple and interdependent: at the social, economic, health, political, educational, work and employment, ethnic-racial, freedoms and citizenship rights’ levels, which pose multiple and complex scientific, moral, social and political challenges to various agents in the post-COVID period. Thus, this Special Issue seeks to be a space for reflection on the aspects that shape the articulation between the complex and polyhedral processes of a pandemic crisis and the possible prospective scenarios in their various components and dimensions, namely the social, cultural, health, ecological, political and economic ones, developed from a positioning that favours the perspectives of the social sciences, emphasising, however, a plural scientific project centred on interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity.

In this Special Issue, we welcome manuscripts of various types, such as research articles, reviews, and conceptual papers (whatever the methodology used) of a disciplinary or transdisciplinary nature, that seek to contribute to the analysis of a “Challenges of post-COVID-19 for a sustainable development society”.

What are the consequences of COVID-19, now in a more distanced analysis and with more information, as well as what will be the future that COVID-19 helped to shape? These are the main purposes of this Special Issue.

Dr. Sandro Serpa
Prof. Carlos Miguel Ferreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19 
  • Coronavirus 
  • Post-COVID-19 
  • Pandemic 
  • Digital society 
  • Sustainable society

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Working Conditions, Employment, Career Development and Well-Being of Refugee Researchers
Societies 2021, 11(3), 71; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030071 - 01 Jul 2021
Viewed by 851
Abstract
The ongoing ‘refugee crisis’ of the past years has led to the migration of refugee researchers (RRs) to European countries. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, RRs often had to work from home and/or to continue their social, cultural and economic integration process under [...] Read more.
The ongoing ‘refugee crisis’ of the past years has led to the migration of refugee researchers (RRs) to European countries. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, RRs often had to work from home and/or to continue their social, cultural and economic integration process under new conditions. An online survey carried out to explore the impact of the pandemic on the refugee researchers showed that RRs found it difficult to adapt their everyday working life to the ‘home’ setting. The majority have had neither a suitable work environment at home nor the appropriate technology. Although they stated that they are rather pleased with the measures taken by the public authorities, they expressed concern about their vulnerability due to their precarious contracts and the bureaucratic asylum procedures, as the pandemic has had a negative impact on these major issues. The majority of RRs working in academia seem not to have been affected at all as far as their income is concerned, while the majority of those employed in other sectors became unemployed during the pandemic (58%). Recommendations are provided to the public authorities and policy makers to assist RRs to mitigate the consequences of the pandemic on their life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges of Post-COVID-19 for a Sustainable Development Society)
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Article
COVID-ized Ethnography: Challenges and Opportunities for Young Environmental Activists and Researchers
Societies 2021, 11(2), 58; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020058 - 07 Jun 2021
Viewed by 845
Abstract
This article offers a critical and reflective examination of the impact of the enforced 2020/21 COVID-19 lockdown on ethnographic fieldwork conducted with UK-based young environmental activists. A matrix of researcher and activist challenges and opportunities has been co-created with young environmental activists using [...] Read more.
This article offers a critical and reflective examination of the impact of the enforced 2020/21 COVID-19 lockdown on ethnographic fieldwork conducted with UK-based young environmental activists. A matrix of researcher and activist challenges and opportunities has been co-created with young environmental activists using an emergent research design, incorporating a phased and intensive iterative process using online ethnography and online qualitative interviews. The article focuses on reflections emerging from the process of co-designing and then use of this matrix in practice. It offers an evidence base which others researching hard-to-reach youth populations may themselves deploy when negotiating face-to-face fieldwork approval at their own academic institutions. The pandemic and its associated control regimes, such as lockdown and social distancing measures, will have lasting effects for both activism and researchers. The methodological reflections we offer in this article have the potential to contribute to the learning of social science researchers with respect to how best to respond when carrying out online fieldwork in such contexts—particularly, but not only, with young activists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges of Post-COVID-19 for a Sustainable Development Society)
Article
Accessibility in Inclusive Tourism? Hotels Distributed through Online Channels
Societies 2021, 11(2), 34; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020034 - 12 Apr 2021
Viewed by 669
Abstract
There is a lack of comprehensive international studies on accommodations for people with disabilities; only small, local-level studies exist. This study aims to show the status of the tourist accommodation sector through the online distribution channel in terms of accessibility to offer more [...] Read more.
There is a lack of comprehensive international studies on accommodations for people with disabilities; only small, local-level studies exist. This study aims to show the status of the tourist accommodation sector through the online distribution channel in terms of accessibility to offer more inclusive tourism. A descriptive analysis has been carried out with more than 31,000 hotels from the online travel agency Booking.com, in the 100 most touristic cities in the world. For the first time, an accurate picture of adaptation in the hotel sector for people with disabilities is presented. Results show that the adapted hotel infrastructures by countries are uneven. The main adaptations are those that help to avoid mobility barriers, and in contrast, hotels offer very few adaptations for sensory disabilities such as visual disabilities. Moreover, this study shows that, worldwide, countries with the highest income per capita, such as the United States of America, Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Qatar or the United Arab Emirates, have the highest degree of hotel adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges of Post-COVID-19 for a Sustainable Development Society)
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