Topical Collection "Community-based Rehabilitation and Community Rehabilitation"

Editor

Prof. Dr. Gregor Wolbring
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada
Interests: community empowerment; technology governance; disability studies; ability studies; ethics; sustainability; health systems; ecohealth
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Community-based Rehabilitation (CBR) and Community Rehabilitation (CR) are two approaches that are similar in many aspects, but which differ in other aspects. This Special Issue invites theoretical and empirical papers that identify emerging and still persistent challenges for CBR and CR on conceptual, implementation, and stakeholder dynamic levels. A recent CBR matrix http://www.who.int/disabilities/cbr/cbr_matrix_11.10.pdf highlighted various aspects of CBR.

This Special Issue seeks authors to engage with CBR and CR through topics reflected in the education, livelihood, social, and empowerment pillars of the CBR matrix. Alternatively, the issue seeks papers concerning assistive devices and how they play out within the non-health pillars of the CBR matrix.

Papers that engage with CBR/CR through the lens of other discourses, such as disability studies, governance of technologies, occupational justice, occupational satisfaction, occupational sustainability, the Post-2015 development agenda, sustainability, eco-health, care ethics (and other ethics theories), cultural competency, global north-global south interaction, and various social theories (such as value, labeling, conflict, choice, identity, motivational, achievement, goal, self-determination, neo-institutional, body theories and social constructivism theories) are especially encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Gregor Wolbring
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • community-based Rehabilitation
  • community Rehabilitation
  • service providers
  • disability Studies
  • ability Studies
  • families
  • social theories
  • occupational justice
  • global south/global north
  • ethics

Published Papers (3 papers)

2021

Jump to: 2015

Concept Paper
Community and Communitarianism in Toni Morrison: Restoring the Self and Relating with the Other
Societies 2021, 11(2), 57; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020057 - 06 Jun 2021
Viewed by 462
Abstract
Toni Morrison discusses the rebirth of the entire Black race through self-recovery. However, her novels are not limited to the identity of Black women and people but are linked to a wider community. Morrison might have tried to imagine a community in which [...] Read more.
Toni Morrison discusses the rebirth of the entire Black race through self-recovery. However, her novels are not limited to the identity of Black women and people but are linked to a wider community. Morrison might have tried to imagine a community in which Black identity can be socially constituted. In this paper, we discuss the concept of community by examining communitarianism, which is the basis of justice and human rights. Although community is an ambiguous notion in the context of communitarianism, communitarians criticize the abstract conceptualization of human rights by liberal individualists, but also see that human rights are universally applicable to a community as a shared conception of social good. Communitarianism emphasizes the role and importance of community in personal life, self-formation, and identity. Morrison highlights the importance of self-worth within the boundary of community, reclaiming the development of Black identity. In the Nancian sense, a community is not a work of art to be produced. It is communicated through sharing the finitude of others—that is, “relation” itself is the fundamental structure of existence. In this regard, considering Toni Morrison’s novels alongside communitarianism and Nancy’s analysis of community may enable us to obtain a sense of the complex aspects of self and community. For Morrison, community may be the need for harmony and combination, acknowledging the differences and diversity of each other, not the opposition between the self and the other, the center and periphery, men and women. This societal communitarianism is the theme covered in this paper, which deals with the problem of identity loss in Morrison’s representative novels Sula and Beloved and examines how Black individuals and community are formed. Therefore, this study aims to examine a more complex understanding of community, in which the self and relations with others can be formed, in the context of Toni Morrison’s works. Full article
Article
Is the Right to Housing Being Realized in Canada? Learning from the Experiences of Tenants in Affordable Housing Units in a Large Canadian City
Societies 2021, 11(2), 53; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020053 - 02 Jun 2021
Viewed by 503
Abstract
Background: Housing is a critical determinant of health and a basic human right. Historically, Canada’s housing policies have not been grounded in a human rights-based approach. In the 1990s, a policy shift prioritized efficiency in government spending and deficit reductions over the provision [...] Read more.
Background: Housing is a critical determinant of health and a basic human right. Historically, Canada’s housing policies have not been grounded in a human rights-based approach. In the 1990s, a policy shift prioritized efficiency in government spending and deficit reductions over the provision of many social programs including affordable housing. With various levels of government now acknowledging and recognizing the need for more affordable housing, it is important to understand tenant experiences, perspectives, and needs to ensure policies and practices are supporting individuals appropriately. Methods: In total, 161 individuals participated in this study by completing online or in-person questionnaires. Results: Exploratory analysis of results revealed that although there were some positive benefits to affordable housing, many tenants continued to struggle financially, physically, mentally, and emotionally without adequate supports in place. Conclusions: These findings highlight the need for affordable housing to be part of a system of care that provides supports along a continuum. The results further reiterate that placing a person or family in affordable housing does not guarantee that their lives have improved. Without robust affordable housing models that prioritize the empowerment of individuals and families, housing policies may fail to fulfil the right to safe and affordable housing for Canadians, especially when considering historically marginalized populations. Full article
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2015

Jump to: 2021

Review
The Applicability of eLearning in Community-Based Rehabilitation
Societies 2015, 5(4), 831-854; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc5040831 - 02 Dec 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2397
Abstract
Community-based rehabilitation (CBR) strives to enhance quality of life for individuals with disabilities and their families by increasing social participation and equalizing opportunities in the global south. Aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals, CBR also aims to address the high rates of poverty [...] Read more.
Community-based rehabilitation (CBR) strives to enhance quality of life for individuals with disabilities and their families by increasing social participation and equalizing opportunities in the global south. Aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals, CBR also aims to address the high rates of poverty faced by individuals with disability. Empowerment, a pillar of CBR, involves strengthening the capacity of people with disabilities, their families, and their communities to ensure reduction of disparities. This article outlines a scoping review that guided by the question: “What is known from the existing literature about the applicability of eLearning for capacity building in CBR?” This review did not uncover literature related to eLearning in CBR; however findings suggest that other disciplines, not explicitly tied to CBR, currently use eLearning to educate and empower professionals in the global south. We argue that eLearning technology could be an effective and sustainable solution for CBR programming in the global south for capacity development. Such technology could increase individuals with disabilities’ access to education and could provide opportunities for wider dissemination of knowledge, beyond typical funding cycles. With a goal of informing future CBR practice in eLearning, this article concludes by highlighting key lessons taken from other disciplines that have utilized eLearning in the global south. Full article
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Figure 1

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