Special Issue "Research on International Migrations and Security Governance"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Salvatore Palidda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
(Retired) Anthropological Sciences, University of Genova, 16126 Genova, Italy
Interests: general sociology; sociology of migrations; sociology of deviancy; social control
Prof. Dr. Fabio Quassoli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Sociologia e Ricerca Sociale, Università degli Studi Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan, Italy
Interests: general sociology; sociology of culture; migrations; sociology of deviancy; social control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The international migrations of 21th Century are largely similar to those of the past; but, the new frame (i.e. economic, social and political context) has an overwhelming influence on its connotation, characteristics, dynamics and outcomes. It is a matter of migrations which subsumes all the health, environmental and economic disasters increasingly exacerbated by neoliberalism. We are therefore faced with a total political fact (a concept that refers to Marcel Mauss, i.e. a fact that include all aspects) which marks a real change in the paradigm of migrations.

The current context has been shaped by neoliberal development since the 1970s. This development has eroded the fundamental rights gained through anti-colonial combats for national independence and through workers' and popular struggles of developed countries. Since then, liberalism has developed the relocation of all economic activities often imposing conditions of neo-slavery in the least developed countries, practice adopted the same super-exploitation even in the same cities of the rich countries, abusing hundreds of miles of undocumented immigrants (in US, in Europe and in other rich countries). To this were added the neo-colonial practices of the multinationals that have increasingly devastated the territories of the emigration countries.

Very serious are the reasons for the increasingly rigid stop to regular migrations: on the one hand they serve to feed irregular immigration in order to use new slaves, that is "disposable" labor or “humanity in excess”, on the other the rulers think that the increase of the world population overlaps with the effects of climate change would generate migrations that would become increasingly desperate, aggressive and even real invasions of rich countries. This explains the radicalisation of hostility against migration to the point of making it a sort of permanent war against this “enemy”, the spectre of the 21st century.

Contributions have to follow one of the three categories (article/review/conceptual paper) of papers of the journal and address the topic of the special issue.

Prof. Dr. Salvatore Palidda
Prof. Dr. Fabio Quassoli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • International migrations
  • Governance of security
  • Humanity in excess
  • Total political fact
  • Neo-slavery
  • Increase of the world population
  • Climate wars

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Portrayal of Immigrants in Danish Media—A Qualitative Content Analysis
Societies 2021, 11(2), 45; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020045 - 13 May 2021
Viewed by 421
Abstract
Media coverage can affect audiences’ perceptions of immigrants, and can play a role in determining the content of public policy agendas, the formation of prejudices, and the prevalence of negative stereotyping. This study investigated the way in which immigrants are represented in the [...] Read more.
Media coverage can affect audiences’ perceptions of immigrants, and can play a role in determining the content of public policy agendas, the formation of prejudices, and the prevalence of negative stereotyping. This study investigated the way in which immigrants are represented in the Danish media, which terms are used, what issues related to immigrants and immigration are discussed and how they are described, and whose voices are heard. The data consisted of media articles published in the two most widely read Danish newspapers in 2019. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted. The portrayal of immigrants was generally negative. Overall, immigrants were portrayed as economic, cultural and security threats to the country. The most salient immigrant groups mentioned in the media were non-Westerners, Muslims, and people ‘on tolerated stay’. Integration, xenophobia and racial discrimination were the three immigrant-related issues most frequently presented by the media. The media gave voice mainly to politicians and immigrant women. The material showed that Danes have a strong affinity for ‘Danishness’, which the papers explained as a major barrier to the integration and acceptance of immigrants in Denmark. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on International Migrations and Security Governance)
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Article
Trends in Attitudes of Whites, Blacks, Asians, and Hispanics toward Intermarriage in the Twenty-First Century
Societies 2021, 11(1), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11010021 - 12 Mar 2021
Viewed by 653
Abstract
No study has simultaneously compared attitudes of whites, blacks, Asians, and Hispanics toward intermarriage over time. This study offers a comparative analysis of the changes in attitudes of whites, blacks, Asians, and Hispanics toward intermarriage with different racial or ethnic groups in the [...] Read more.
No study has simultaneously compared attitudes of whites, blacks, Asians, and Hispanics toward intermarriage over time. This study offers a comparative analysis of the changes in attitudes of whites, blacks, Asians, and Hispanics toward intermarriage with different racial or ethnic groups in the twenty-first century, using nationally representative samples from General Social Surveys 2000–2018. Our trend analyses reveal that whites’ support for intermarriage with minorities has generally increased, albeit at a relatively lower level; blacks’ support for intermarriage with Asians, Hispanics, and whites has been quite stable at a relatively high level; Asians’ and Hispanics’ support for intermarriage with other minorities has generally shown an upswing trend with some minor fluctuations, but their support for intermarriage with whites has gone in the opposite direction with oscillations. The results of our generalized linear ordinal logistic regression models show that either including or excluding control variables, whites’ attitudes have become generally more supportive of intermarriage with minorities, blacks’ support for intermarriage has displayed an undulated pattern, and Asians’ and Hispanics’ support for intermarriage reveal diverse patterns depending on the group to intermarry with. The findings indicate a general trend of narrowing intergroup social distances as well as some increases in social distance between certain groups in the United States in the twenty-first century. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on International Migrations and Security Governance)
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