Special Issue "Problems in Adolescents: What Are the Psychological, Social and Financial Consequences?"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Goran Livazovic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Osijek 31000, Croatia
Interests: social pedagogy; media education; pedagogy of adolescence; leisure education; statistical analyses in social sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Behavioral problems are often defined as disorders that contradict specific age, cultural and social values and norms. Internalization and externalization disorders in early life constantly impact a number of related personal and social problems in later life if left untreated. Behavioral problems often lead to aggressive behavior, anxiety, stress, addiction, strained relationships, decreased self-esteem, alienation and social exclusion, with profound direct and indirect effects on the child's cognitive, social and learning development. This might have negative short-term and long-term effects on an individual’s personal, social and professional lives.

This Special Issue is focused on the theoretical, empirical and practical research implications of various risk and protective factors from the perspective of Bronfenbrenner's bioecological model or ecological systems theory. The aim is to examine individual and personal factors of the microsystem, the importance of proximal social relations in the mesosystem, as well as the more distal social influences in the surrounding community, such as the importance of social institutions, norms and values at the exosystemic and macrosystemic levels.

The invited contributors are asked to provide novel perspectives on contemporary research approaches in the field of risky and problem behaviors in adolescents. The topics should be focused on the roles of family, school, peers, the media and leisure activities, as well as broader potential social agents and cultural influences (education, health and social welfare, community life and civil society).

The invited contributors should aim to provide insights into recent advances in problem behavior research and successful prevention programs or educational and social strategies with adolescents.

Contributions must fit into one of three journal paper categories (article, conceptual paper or review) and address the topic of this Special Issue.

Dr. Goran Livazovic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • problem behavior
  • adolescents
  • bioecological model
  • risk and protective factors
  • internalized and externalized problems
  • prevention strategies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Student Perception of the Social Value of Responsible Management
Societies 2021, 11(1), 16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11010016 - 26 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 633
Abstract
In responsible management, managerial efficiency and sustainable development meet and influence each other. In order to give meaning to their organisation, to respect and look after their collaborators, a manager must promote a set of values on a personal, organisational and societal level. [...] Read more.
In responsible management, managerial efficiency and sustainable development meet and influence each other. In order to give meaning to their organisation, to respect and look after their collaborators, a manager must promote a set of values on a personal, organisational and societal level. The purpose of this paper is to study the social value attributed to responsible management by students of a technical university. We have therefore undertaken to study a set of seven values attributed to responsible management and, more precisely, their utility and social desirability on a personal, organisational and societal level. The values have been operationalized with personality descriptors. The 60 participants in this study are students from a Romanian technical university. They had to assess, on four scales of seven points each (two for desirability and two for social utility), the value of a person characterised by one of the seven values attributed to responsible management. The results show us that efficiency is the value perceived by the students as being the most desirable for responsible management, and that in terms of social utility, agility is the most appreciated value. We found that there is indeed an effect of the context in which these values are perceived. Efficiency, audacity, dedication and integrity are perceived as more useful at an organisational level, while solidarity was perceived as more useful on a societal level. At the organisational level we also found a gender effect, in the sense that women appreciate people who are efficient, have integrity or are humble more than men do. Full article
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Article
Making School Children’s Participation in Planning Processes a Routine Practice
Societies 2021, 11(1), 3; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11010003 - 01 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 897
Abstract
Children’s participation in planning has been investigated to some extent. There are, however, unexplored topics, particularly concerning what is needed for children’s participation to become a regular process. Based on case studies in Sweden, this article draws some conclusions. It is quite possible [...] Read more.
Children’s participation in planning has been investigated to some extent. There are, however, unexplored topics, particularly concerning what is needed for children’s participation to become a regular process. Based on case studies in Sweden, this article draws some conclusions. It is quite possible to organize ordinary processes where children participate in community building, in collaboration with planners, as part of their schoolwork. The key question is how this can be done. Clearly, it needs to occur in close collaboration with teachers and pupils, however it also needs to be implemented in a system-challenging manner. Thus, rather than looking for tools with potential to work in the existing school and planners’ world, it is important to design research that aims to create learning processes that have the potential to change praxis. Hence, it is not the case that tools are not needed, rather that children need to help to develop them. Full article
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