Special Issue "Social Impacts of XXI Century Innovations in Built Environment"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Emanuele Giorgi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Art and Design, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico
Interests: built environment; architectural engineering; healthy cities; co-housing; local communities; sustainable communities; vulnerable communities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, an awareness of being in a new geological era of the Anthropocene has become a keystone for several fields of knowledge. At the global and local scales, society has become increasingly aware that humanity is facing challenges that daily put at risk the precarious balance between humanity and the environment. While this consciousness has spread the idea of an essential inseparable connection between the natural and the social spheres, economic and technological motivations have worn down human relations with the environment and with communities.

This is a particularly debated topic for the built environment, where increasing technological capabilities and the dominant role of economic systems have led, too often, the process of decision making. Nevertheless, in spite of this general tendency, in the XXI century, innovative practices of intervention in the built environment, based on social sustainable strategies, are increasingly common. Among the others, topics such as commons and communitarian development, rural–urban relations, and healthy and accessible territories are becoming crucial in the debate on the built environment.

This Special Issue proposes a theoretical and critical discussion of the relations between innovative practices of intervention on the built environment and their impact on the social fabric. From the scale of the globe to the scale of the neighborhood, what makes an action a successful intervention and a successful promoter of social development? How does the social realities promote positive actions in the built environment?

For this purpose, societies invite papers of original research that address any practice coming from all the disciplines related to the built environment, and whose effects impact our society.

Dr. Emanuele Giorgi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Spatial Equity in Urban Public Space (UPS) Based on Analysis of Municipal Public Policy Omissions: A Case Study of Atizapán de Zaragoza, State of México
Societies 2020, 10(1), 8; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc10010008 - 13 Jan 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1862
Abstract
International agendas, such as the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, have been established as global guidelines for equitable planning of urban centers. However, there is a lack of indicators and tools for public policy planning at the local level. Spatial equity in planning has [...] Read more.
International agendas, such as the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, have been established as global guidelines for equitable planning of urban centers. However, there is a lack of indicators and tools for public policy planning at the local level. Spatial equity in planning has been related to the spatial match between public facility level and residents´ distribution. The objective of this research was to assess the spatial inequity in urban public space (UPS) of Atizapán de Zaragoza, State of Mexico, and analyzed the cause of this phenomenon with a methodological framework based on the general indicator omissions in public policy. The indicator, omission of municipal public policies associated to UPS, allowed us to explain the existence of the spatial inequity in: (1) the conceptualization and interpretation that decision makers have about urban environmental development in the territory; (2) the lack of a public discussion about the sustainable vocation of the municipality; and (3) the dominant values of the actors involved in the production, planning, and installation of UPS. The significance of this phenomenon affects the recognition that UPS is a primary element for guaranteeing the rights to a healthy environment in equitable and sustainable cities and a resource for strengthening social cohesion, governance, and appropriation of public assets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Impacts of XXI Century Innovations in Built Environment)
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Review

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Review
Social and Spatial Experiences in the Cities of Tomorrow
Societies 2020, 10(1), 9; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc10010009 - 16 Jan 2020
Viewed by 867
Abstract
As described by the strong academic literature, (Vattimo, Bauman, Mumford, Simon, Haraway, Meschiari, Florida) the contemporary society is going through new challenges, such as the friction between youth, technology, and productivity. These challenges affect the way people live and experience the cities, but [...] Read more.
As described by the strong academic literature, (Vattimo, Bauman, Mumford, Simon, Haraway, Meschiari, Florida) the contemporary society is going through new challenges, such as the friction between youth, technology, and productivity. These challenges affect the way people live and experience the cities, but also the way cities need to evolve. An anthological analysis and a study of secondary sources is used to analyze the new spatial and social experiences, while the analysis of Milan (Italy) as a case study of a creative city is used to understand the rapid shift towards the virtualization of cities, in which consumption is progressively induced by a projected image of the city rather than its actual physical fabric. This manuscript opens a research front, with the goal to understand how architecture and urban design should leave the traditional typologies to propose a new way of creating and living architecture, caught in the middle between the real and the virtual. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Impacts of XXI Century Innovations in Built Environment)
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