Special Issue "New Approaches to Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Repair"

A special issue of Surgeries (ISSN 2673-4095).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Shanmugam Muruganandan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Research Scientist, Northeastern University College of Science, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Interests: stem cells; bone; cartilage; development; regeneration; genetic and surgical models; endometrium; tissue remodeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“New Approaches to Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Repair” is an upcoming Special Issue to be published in “Surgeries”. Its goal is to present the major progress achieved in the field of musculoskeletal tissue engineering and the latest discoveries, including novel methods and strategies, that add to the technological advancements of our clinical capabilities to treat musculoskeletal defects. The Special Issue will accept original studies and reviews on the array of novel bioengineering technologies that include highly integrated approaches, such as stem cell technologies, biomaterials, gene therapy and other regeneration therapies for the repair of musculoskeletal defects. We propose a submission deadline of 5 April 2021. Please feel free to circulate this announcement to others you feel might be interested.

Dr. Muruganandan Shanmugam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Surgeries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stem cells;
  • biomaterials;
  • gene therapy;
  • biochemical factors;
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Identifying Consensus and Open Questions around Assessing or Predicting the Quality and Success of Cartilage Repair: A Delphi Study
Surgeries 2021, 2(3), 286-302; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/surgeries2030029 - 06 Aug 2021
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Abstract
A range of surgical techniques have been developed for the repair or regeneration of lesioned cartilage in the human knee and a corresponding array of scoring systems have been created to assess their outcomes. The published literature displays a wide range of opinions [...] Read more.
A range of surgical techniques have been developed for the repair or regeneration of lesioned cartilage in the human knee and a corresponding array of scoring systems have been created to assess their outcomes. The published literature displays a wide range of opinions regarding the factors that influence the success of surgical cartilage repair and which parameters are the most useful for measuring the quality of the repair at follow-up. Our objective was to provide some clarity to the field by collating items that were agreed upon by a panel of experts to be important in these areas. A modified, three-round Delphi consensus study was carried out consisting of one idea-generating focus-group and two subsequent, self-completed questionnaire rounds. In each round, items were assessed for their importance and level of consensus against pre-determined threshold levels. In total, 31 items reached consensus, including a hierarchy of tissues in the joint based on their importance in cartilage repair, markers of repair cartilage quality and the implications of environmental and patient-related factors. Items were stratified into those that can be employed for predicting the success of cartilage repair and those that could be used for assessing the structural quality of the resulting repair cartilage. Items that did not reach consensus represent areas where dissent remains and could, therefore, be used to guide future clinical and fundamental scientific research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Approaches to Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Repair)
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Article
Towards Tissue-Specific Stem Cell Therapy for the Intervertebral Disc: PPARδ Agonist Increases the Yield of Human Nucleus Pulposus Progenitor Cells in Expansion
Surgeries 2021, 2(1), 92-104; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/surgeries2010008 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 799
Abstract
(1) Background: Low back pain (LBP) is often associated with intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD). Autochthonous progenitor cells isolated from the center, i.e., the nucleus pulposus, of the IVD (so-called nucleus pulposus progenitor cells (NPPCs)) could be a future cell source for therapy. The [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Low back pain (LBP) is often associated with intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD). Autochthonous progenitor cells isolated from the center, i.e., the nucleus pulposus, of the IVD (so-called nucleus pulposus progenitor cells (NPPCs)) could be a future cell source for therapy. The NPPCs were also identified to be positive for the angiopoietin-1 receptor (Tie2). Similar to hematopoietic stem cells, Tie2 might be involved in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) agonist-induced self-renewal regulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a PPARδ agonist (GW501516) increases the Tie2+ NPPCs’ yield within the heterogeneous nucleus pulposus cell (NPC) population. (2) Methods: Primary NPCs were treated with 10 µM of GW501516 for eight days. Mitochondrial mass was determined by microscopy, using mitotracker red dye, and the relative gene expression was quantified by qPCR, using extracellular matrix and mitophagy-related genes. (3) The NPC’s group treated with the PPARδ agonist showed a significant increase of the Tie2+ NPCs yield from ~7% in passage 1 to ~50% in passage two, compared to the NPCs vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, no significant differences were found among treatment and control, using qPCR and mitotracker deep red. (4) Conclusion: PPARδ agonist could help to increase the Tie2+ NPCs yield during NPC expansion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Approaches to Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Repair)
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Review

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Review
Tissue Engineering in Musculoskeletal Tissue: A Review of the Literature
Surgeries 2021, 2(1), 58-82; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/surgeries2010005 - 28 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 682
Abstract
Tissue engineering refers to the attempt to create functional human tissue from cells in a laboratory. This is a field that uses living cells, biocompatible materials, suitable biochemical and physical factors, and their combinations to create tissue-like structures. To date, no tissue engineered [...] Read more.
Tissue engineering refers to the attempt to create functional human tissue from cells in a laboratory. This is a field that uses living cells, biocompatible materials, suitable biochemical and physical factors, and their combinations to create tissue-like structures. To date, no tissue engineered skeletal muscle implants have been developed for clinical use, but they may represent a valid alternative for the treatment of volumetric muscle loss in the near future. Herein, we reviewed the literature and showed different techniques to produce synthetic tissues with the same architectural, structural and functional properties as native tissues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Approaches to Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Repair)
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