Special Issue "The Multifaceted Nature of Food and Nutrition Insecurity around the World and Foodservice Business"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Food".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Heesup Han
grade E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747, Korea
Interests: food quality; service quality; restaurants; cafés; hotels; cruises; green consumption; tourism; sustainable destination development
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The international concept of food security is a situation where all people have physical, social and economic access at all times to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. All four parameters (availability, access, utilization and stability) should therefore be measured to determine food security status.

The matter of hunger, which is generally equated with access to inadequate amounts of food and compromised food quality to reach the required daily intake, is addressed by both food and nutrient insecurity. In the past, the food security term has been the issue of food availability and accessibility, and the utilization aspect has been identified as essential more recently.

Nutrition, on the other hand, centered on consuming adequate diversified meals and nutrient absorption that could contribute to other forms of malnutrition, such as hidden hunger and obesity.

Food quality is another critical issue across the globe. In their daily life, an individual eats at a restaurant/café/hotel and seeks for better quality food and service. Quality performance of food and service at a foodservice operation contributes to making one’s consumption happier and his/her life healthier.  

Taking into account these premises, this Special Issue aims to present original research articles, reviews, and short communications concerning the following topics:

  • Agriculture and food security
  • Agri-tourism and its potential to assist with food security
  • Business–science cooperation to advance food security
  • Competing demands and tradeoffs for land and water resources
  • Consumer behavior, nutritional security and food assistance programs
  • Food and health
  • Global and local analyses of food security and its drivers
  • Global governance and food security
  • Infectious and non-infectious diseases and food security
  • Reducing food loss and waste
  • Reducing risks to food production and distribution from climate change
  • Supply chains and food security
  • Technological breakthroughs to help feed globe
  • Tourism food security relationship
  • Urbanization, food value chains, and the sustainable, secure sourcing of food
  • Food and service quality at food catering establishments
  • Consumer behavior at foodservice operations (restaurants, cafés, hotels)

Dr. António Raposo
Prof. Dr. Heesup Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agriculture
  • consumer behavior
  • food habits
  • food industry
  • food policy
  • food safety and quality
  • food security
  • food industry and technology
  • nutritional diseases
  • tourism
  • service quality at restaurants/cafés/hotels

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Investigating International Students’ Perception of Foodservice Attributes in Malaysian Research Universities
Sustainability 2021, 13(15), 8190; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13158190 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 463
Abstract
University foodservice is expected to satisfy students’ food needs and is one of the necessities at a university. However, serving a community of international students who are multicultural is not an easy task. Thus, it is necessary to recognize international students’ needs and [...] Read more.
University foodservice is expected to satisfy students’ food needs and is one of the necessities at a university. However, serving a community of international students who are multicultural is not an easy task. Thus, it is necessary to recognize international students’ needs and wants in order to increase their satisfaction with the overall on-campus dining experience. This study conducted an importance–performance analysis to examine international students’ perceived importance and perceived performance of university foodservice attributes. Using a self-administered questionnaire, a total of 620 international students who were studying in Malaysian research universities comprised the sample of this study. The results showed that food price was the most satisfactory foodservice attribute as perceived by international students. Food quality was deemed unsatisfactory and represented the main weakness. Results from this study can assist in determining how international students perceive the quality of the key attributes of on-campus foodservices and identify fields in which improvements are required. Full article
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Article
Analysis of Nutritional Quality Attributes and Their Inter-Relationship in Maize Inbred Lines for Sustainable Livelihood
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6137; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13116137 - 29 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 772
Abstract
The present investigation was planned to understand the variability and inter-relationship among various nutritional quality attributes of maize kernels to identify potential donors of the respective traits for future hybridization programs. Sixty-three maize inbred lines were processed for the estimation of protein, starch, [...] Read more.
The present investigation was planned to understand the variability and inter-relationship among various nutritional quality attributes of maize kernels to identify potential donors of the respective traits for future hybridization programs. Sixty-three maize inbred lines were processed for the estimation of protein, starch, fat, sugar, 100-kernel weight, specific gravity, and moisture level of the grain. The results reveal that a wide variability among protein, starch, 100-kernel weight, specific gravity, and fat was seen, with special emphasis on the protein concentration that varied from 8.83 to 15.54%, starch (67.43–75.31%), and 100-kernel weight (9.14–36.11 gm). Factor analysis revealed that the protein concentration, starch, and 100-kernel weight, the three major components, comprise 68.58% of the kernel variability. Protein exhibited a significant negative correlation with starch and 100-kernel weight, indicating that an increase in the protein concentration will down-regulate the starch and 100-kernel weight. The inbred lines are proposed as donors for the development of high cultivars for their respective traits, viz., high protein (DMR WNC NY 403 and DMR WNC NY 404), high starch concentration (DMR WNC NY 2163, DMR WNC NY 2219, DMR WNC NY 2234, DMR WNC NY 2408, DMR WNC NY 2437, and DMR WNC NY 2466), high 100-kernel wt. (DMR WNC NY 2113, DMR WNC NY 2213, DMR WNC NY 2233, DMR WNC NY 2234, DMR WNC NY 2414, DMR WNC NY 2435, DMR WNC NY 2465, and DMR WNC NY 2474), sugar (DMR WNC NY 2417), and specific gravity (DMR WNC NY 2418). Genetic distance analysis revealed that DMR WNC NY 397 and DMR WNC NY 404 are the farthest apart inbred lines, having major differences in their protein, fat, starch, and sugar contents, followed by DMR WNC NY 2436 and DMR WNC NY 2394, DMR WNC NY 2212 and DMR WNC NY 2430, DMR WNC NY 396 and DMR WNC NY 2415, DMR WNC NY 404 and DMR WNC NY 2144, and DMR WNC NY403 and DMR WNC NY 2115. Moreover, this study proposes that these possible combinations of lines (in a breeding program) would result in genetic variability with simultaneous high values for the respective characteristics. Full article
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Article
A Comprehensive Appraisal of the Wild Food Plants and Food System of Tribal Cultures in the Hindu Kush Mountain Range; a Way Forward for Balancing Human Nutrition and Food Security
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5258; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13095258 - 08 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 795
Abstract
The tribal belt of the Hindu Kush mountains is famous for its unique culture, ethnography, wild food plants, food systems, and traditional knowledge. People in this region gather wild plants and plant parts using them directly or in traditional cuisine, or sell them [...] Read more.
The tribal belt of the Hindu Kush mountains is famous for its unique culture, ethnography, wild food plants, food systems, and traditional knowledge. People in this region gather wild plants and plant parts using them directly or in traditional cuisine, or sell them in local markets. However, there is a huge lack of documentation of the food system, particularly that related to wild food plants (WFP). In the current study, we focus on the uses and contributions of WFPs in the traditional tribal food system of the Hindu Kush valleys along the Pakistan–Afghanistan border. Ethnobotanical data were gathered through questionnaire surveys of 84 informants, including 69 men and 15 women, belonging to 21 different villages of the chosen area. In tribal societies men and women rarely mix and thus very few women took part in the surveys. We documented 63 WFP species belonging to 34 botanical families, of which 27 were used as vegetables, 24 as fruits, six in different kinds of chutneys (starters), and six as fresh food species. Fruits were the most used part (41%), followed by leaves (24%), aerial parts (24%), seeds (7%), stems (3%), and young inflorescences (1%). The reported uses of Carthamus oxyacantha, Pinus roxburghii seeds, and Marsilea quadrifolia leaves are novel for the gastronomy of Pakistan. The results reveal that WFPs provide a significant contribution to local food systems and play a role in addressing human nutritional needs, which are usually not met through farming practices. The tribal peoples of the Hindu Kush use WFPs for their nutritional value, but also as a cultural practice—an inseparable component of the tribal community’s lifestyle. This important traditional knowledge about the gathering and consumption of WFPs, however, is eroding at an alarming rate among younger generations due to the introduction of fast-food, modernization, and globalization. Therefore, appropriate strategies are imperative not only to safeguard traditional plants and food knowledge and practices, as well as the cultural heritage attached to them, but also to foster food security and thus public healthcare via local wild foods in the region. Full article
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Article
Extraction of Essential Oil from River Tea Tree (Melaleuca bracteata F. Muell.): Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 4827; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13094827 - 25 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 736
Abstract
Tea tree oil (TTO) from the genus Melaleuca L. has antimicrobial, antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant properties and is used by the cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and horticultural industries. In Pakistan, Melaleuca bracteata can be exploited for essential oil purposes, as this species is well adapted [...] Read more.
Tea tree oil (TTO) from the genus Melaleuca L. has antimicrobial, antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant properties and is used by the cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and horticultural industries. In Pakistan, Melaleuca bracteata can be exploited for essential oil purposes, as this species is well adapted to Pakistan’s agroclimatic conditions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the yield of M. bracteata essential oil together with its antioxidant and antimicrobial properties under local prevailing conditions of the subtropics. Essential oil was extracted through the hydrodistillation method. Using this method, six batches of 8 kg samples (fresh leaves and branches) underwent a distillation process for 4–5 h. The average yield obtained was about 0.2%. The GCMS was used to identify the components of extracted essential oil. Eugenol methyl ether is the major component in extracted essential oil, i.e., 96% of the total. A high content of flavonoids and phenolics and a Fe-reducing power ability of M. bracteata were observed. The oil was also found effective against B. subtilis, B. cereus, White rot, and A. flavus. Hence, it is concluded that there is a possibility to use TTO for its biocidal properties, and it must also be inspected and then commercialized in Pakistan by the agriculture and cosmetic industries. Full article
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Article
The Impact of Climate Change on the Food (In)security of the Siberian Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic: Environmental and Health Risks
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2561; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13052561 - 27 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 923
Abstract
Climate change represents a global challenge that impacts the environment, traditional lifestyle and health of the Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic zone of Western Siberia and threatens their food security. Reindeer are an important food source for this population since reindeer herding products [...] Read more.
Climate change represents a global challenge that impacts the environment, traditional lifestyle and health of the Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic zone of Western Siberia and threatens their food security. Reindeer are an important food source for this population since reindeer herding products are used as traditional nutrition and effective preventive means and remedies for adapting to the cold and geomagnetic activity in the High North. Longer off-season periods, high summer and winter temperatures, melting ice, and forest and tundra fires have a significant impact on the trampling and degradation of reindeer pastures. These effects may lead to massive reindeer losses and changes in the traditional diet of the Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, which result in increases in the prevalence of respiratory diseases, overweight and hypertension. This study applied a multidisciplinary approach based on ecological and medical research methods with the inclusion of socioeconomic analysis. The primary sources included data on the longitudinal dynamics of air temperature as a climate change indicator and reindeer livestock populations (1936–2018), consumption of reindeer products and physiological impacts on the Yamal Indigenous population collected during expeditions to the Arctic zone of Western Siberia in 2012–2018. Full article
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Article
Design and Development of an Instrument on Knowledge of Food Safety, Practices, and Risk Perception Addressed to Children and Adolescents from Low-Income Families
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2324; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13042324 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 900
Abstract
In the fight against foodborne diseases, expanding access to information for different groups is needed. In this aspect, it is crucial to evaluate the target audience’s particularities. This study constructed and validated an instrument containing three questionnaires to identify the level of knowledge, [...] Read more.
In the fight against foodborne diseases, expanding access to information for different groups is needed. In this aspect, it is crucial to evaluate the target audience’s particularities. This study constructed and validated an instrument containing three questionnaires to identify the level of knowledge, practices, and risk perception of food safety by low-income students between 11 and 14 years old. The following steps were used: systematic search of the databases; conducting and analyzing focus groups; questionnaires development; and questionnaires analysis. After two judges’ rounds, the final version was reached with 11 knowledge items, 11 practice items, and five risk perception items. The content validation index values were higher than 0.80. The adopted methodology considered the students’ understanding and perceptions, as well the appropriate language to be used. Besides, it allowed the development of questionnaires that directly and straightforwardly covers the rules set by the World Health Organization for foodborne disease control called Five Keys to Safer Food (keep clean; separate raw and cooked; cook thoroughly; keep food at safe temperatures; and use safe water and raw materials). Its use can result in a diagnosis for elaborating educational proposals and other actions against foodborne illness in the most vulnerable population. Full article
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