Special Issue "Role of Farmers’ Socioeconomic Factors in Sustainable Production and Livelihoods under Climate Change"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Air, Climate Change and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nasir Mahmood
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics & Agricultural Economics, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi 46000, Pakistan
Interests: agricultural economics; climate change impact assessment; economic efficiency studies; climate-based e-extension services; climate change Fatalism; forest economics; rural development
Prof. Dr. Irfan Ahmad Baig
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dean Faculty of Social Sciences & Humanities, Department of Agribusiness & Applied Economics, MNS- University of Agriculture, Multan 66000, Pakistan
Interests: climat change; resource use efficiency; water resource management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is posing an immense challenge across the globe, especially for those in communities in rural areas who depend upon agriculture for their livelihoods. The changing climatic conditions are exerting adverse impacts through various means, ranging from droughts to floods along with rising temperatures, and erratic rainfall patterns. Farming communities are the worst-hit by climate change as they are directly influenced by these conditions. These impacts are reflected in terms of huge crop yield losses and resource base degradation, which increase the cost of production and cause physical damage to the crops, which ultimately affects the livelihoods of the communities either directly or indirectly connected with agriculture. We cannot ignore the role of the various agronomic inputs used by the farmers for increasing yields, but other very important socioeconomic factors can also play a significant role in managing the farming business to maximize profit. The best solutions to fight against the challenge created by climate change are suitable field management and adaptation practices that can minimize climate-induced impacts. A farmer with more education, access to resources like labor, and on-farm income is more likely to adopt to climate-smart agricultural practices in time to potentially increase crop yields.

Small-scale farmers have limited access to formal credit sources, but the availability of informal credit from friends, relatives, and farmer cooperatives can help them to purchase and apply various inputs in timely manner to achieve higher yields. Although information on climate change from extension workers and media sources is playing an important role, the role of informal information exchange through neighbors and fellow famers, especially at marketplaces, cannot be ignored. This means that the easy access to input markets also incerases awareness among farmers about climate variability and better field management practices. Thus, along with various crop inputs, farmers’ socioeconomic factors can play a significant role in improving field management and uptake of adaptation strategies to minimize the harmful impacts of climate change and to achieve sustainable crop production.

Therefore, it is crucial to discern the role of farmers’ socioeconomic factors under the changing climate on their welfare. The purpose of this Special Issue is to explore the rarely considered aspect of farmers’ socioeconomic factors and its ultimate impact on their welfare in the era of changing climatic conditions and deteriorating environmental conditions. This Special Issue welcomes articles on the abovementioned topic, which will provide valuable contributions to the literature on climate-centered studies.

Dr. Nasir Mahmood
Prof. Dr. Irfan Ahmad Baig
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • adaptation and adaptive capacity
  • gender disaggregated effects
  • crop productivity
  • economic efficiency
  • credit access through informal markets
  • farmer cooperatives
  • access to input markets
  • the role of marketing intermediaries
  • technology adoption
  • advisory services
  • farmers’ livelihoods under changing climate
  • impact of co-working in information dissemination

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Migration and Climate Change Impacts on Rural Entrepreneurs in Nigeria: A Gender Perspective
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8882; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13168882 - 09 Aug 2021
Viewed by 524
Abstract
Although the effects of climate change are universal, some groups are more negatively affected than others, which has raised global concerns. The most affected are families involved with agriculture or that use natural resources in rural areas as a means of livelihood. This [...] Read more.
Although the effects of climate change are universal, some groups are more negatively affected than others, which has raised global concerns. The most affected are families involved with agriculture or that use natural resources in rural areas as a means of livelihood. This study aimed to assess the responses of rural dwellers to climate change and migration, determine the extent of climate change as a driver of migration, assess the viability of migration as an option for climate change adaptation, and evaluate the gender perspective of migration and the impact of climate change on entrepreneurial development in rural areas. A qualitative method was employed to solicit responses from respondents in selected rural areas under four different vegetation zones through in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti. A difference was found in gender reactions to migration due to socio-cultural factors and family responsibilities. In addition, different types of migration patterns were found to exist among men and women. The study also revealed that climate change is a major driver of migration, affects livelihood practices differently in the vegetation zones, and has a negative impact on the entrepreneurship development of the rural areas. Finally, this study provides insights into the effect of migration type on the entrepreneurship development by gender. Full article
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Article
Does Stakeholder Pressure Matters in Adopting Sustainable Supply Chain Initiatives? Insights from Agro-Based Processing Industry
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7278; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13137278 - 29 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 472
Abstract
Over the past few years, sustainable supply chain initiatives (SSCIs) have grabbed attention in the domestic, as well as global, marketplace of the food sector. Nowadays, the success of the entire food supply chain depends on the prosperity of farms, local communities, trader [...] Read more.
Over the past few years, sustainable supply chain initiatives (SSCIs) have grabbed attention in the domestic, as well as global, marketplace of the food sector. Nowadays, the success of the entire food supply chain depends on the prosperity of farms, local communities, trader processors, and agro-based industries. Despite its importance, food processing industries (FPIs) are encountering various hurdles in achieving sustainable business goals due to the sheer number of potential barriers. Due to this reason, stakeholders are continuously pressuring the management of FPIs to embrace sustainable food processing activities. In light of this, the present study aims to apply a hybrid fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (F-AHP) framework, based on fuzzy technique for order preference by similarity to the ideal solution (F-TOPSIS), for analyzing the barriers and prioritizing the possible pathways in adopting the SSCIs for the development of FPIs. Based on the extensive review of literature and panel consultation with experienced experts, a total of seven main barriers, forty-two sub barriers, and five possible pathways as strategic tools were finalized and ranked. An empirical case investigation of a Pakistani-based food processing company has been taken to check the practical application of the proposed framework along with sensitivity analysis. The findings of this study reveal that the lack of sustainable outsourcing factors were found as the top-ranked barrier in implementing SSCIs, and the possible pathway to overcome this barrier is the appropriate management of the procurement cycle. The major contribution of this study is to establish a barriers prioritization framework and suggest possible pathways to overcome these barriers for the successful implementation of SSCIs. Finally, the theoretical, managerial, and policy implications are provided as a way forward for the concerned stakeholders and policymakers. Full article
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