sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Topical Collection "Food Additives and Sustainability"

A topical collection in Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This collection belongs to the section "Sustainable Food".

Editors

Dr. Márcio Carocho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: chemistry of natural products; nutraceuticals and functional foods; technology of natural products; engineering of protective food products with natural compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Patricia Morales
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Interests: food science and technology; natural food matrix; food additives; functional foods and ingredients
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advancement of science is essential to the food industry, and, likewise, this industry is pivotal to mankind, thus, sustainability in food science is the guarantee that food will be delivered worldwide in the finest conditions of hygiene and safety. Food additives play an essential role in this industry by conferring special traits to food, namely to preserve, colour, sweeten or carry out other technologic purposes. Today, the industry relies primarily on synthetic or artificial additives, and, in some cases natural molecules are allowed. These are either harvested from plants or mimicked from their natural counterparts. Inversely, consumer preferences tend to favor natural food additives, thus increasing their research, further pressurizing the industry and governing bodies to loosen legislation. Concomitantly, consumer awareness of pollution and environmental changes resulting from the food industry is increasing, to which the additive production industry contributes towards, either through the synthesis of toxic compounds, use of hazardous chemicals and solvents, treatment of resulting by-products and finally by use of non-renewable resources for their manufacture.

The transition to natural food additives has already started, namely with the introduction of rosemary extract as a preservative, but also the use of steviol glycosides as sweeteners and various natural pigments as colouring agents. This natural revolution has promoted the pursuit of new natural compounds and the increase of their production yields and stability. Still, this is only the dawn of natural food additives, and a long road lies ahead.

Accordingly, this collection will accept research involving:

  • Sustainable production of crops, microorganisms and animals as raw material for food additive production
  • Chemical characterization of natural food additives
  • Sustainable/alternative processes of additive production
  • Analytical methods of food additive determination
  • Additive interaction with food matrices
  • Bio-based/functional food ingredients
  • Biochemical impacts of food additives in the human body
  • Toxicology and pharmacokinetics of food additives
  • Consumer studies
  • Food additive policy and legislation

Dr. Márcio Carocho
Dr. Patricia Morales
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural food additives
  • sustainable additives
  • food chemistry and technology
  • sustainable processes

Published Papers (8 papers)

2021

Jump to: 2020, 2019

Article
Quality and Oxidative Changes of Minced Cooked Pork Incorporated with Moringa oleifera Leaf and Root Powder
Sustainability 2021, 13(18), 10126; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su131810126 - 10 Sep 2021
Viewed by 569
Abstract
Consumers are currently demanding meat products produced using natural additives due to their potential health benefits. Consequently, there has been a progressive interest in the search for more natural antioxidant sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of varying [...] Read more.
Consumers are currently demanding meat products produced using natural additives due to their potential health benefits. Consequently, there has been a progressive interest in the search for more natural antioxidant sources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of varying levels of M. oleifera root and leaf powder on the oxidative stability and quality of cooked minced pork during eight days of refrigerated storage at 4 °C. The leaves contained significantly higher (p ˂ 0.05) concentrations of total phenols (50.08 ± 0.01 mg GAE/g), while the roots contained the highest amounts of flavonoids (375.15 ± 0.19 mg QE/g) and proanthocyanidins (132.62 ± 0.4 mg CE/g). Both plant parts demonstrated good 2,2-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2 íazino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) free radical scavenging activity. Minced cooked pork incorporated with M. oleifera leaf and root powder had significantly lower pH and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values compared to the control (p < 0.05). The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) was also significantly higher in the samples that incorporated antioxidants compared to the control (p < 0.05). Findings from this study suggest that M. oleifera leaves and roots are potent antioxidant sources which can be incorporated in meat to improve quality attributes during storage. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2020

Jump to: 2021, 2019

Article
Bioresource Utilization of Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum) Biomass as Natural Antioxidants
Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 5926; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12155926 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 935
Abstract
Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum) is a yearly, fast-growing, under-utilized pseudo-cereal with a high proportion of biomass content. We used the hulls, which are usually removed from djulis as crop residue, to evaluate the free-radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of djulis. We studied [...] Read more.
Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum) is a yearly, fast-growing, under-utilized pseudo-cereal with a high proportion of biomass content. We used the hulls, which are usually removed from djulis as crop residue, to evaluate the free-radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of djulis. We studied the antioxidant capacity of ethanol- and water-extracted hulls and roots by using various in vitro methods. Ascorbic acid was the reference sample. The extract samples were used at 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 µg/mL. Total sugar content, total phenolic content, and total flavonoid content were assessed. Antioxidant activity was assessed by using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, and N, N-dimethyl-ρ-phenylenediamine. Ethanol- and water-extracted red djulis hulls showed high amounts of total sugar, total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, and antioxidant capacity. Moreover, ethanol- and water-extracted red djulis roots showed moderate antioxidant capacity. However, ethanol- and water-extracted yellow djulis hulls showed limited antioxidant activities. Utilization of the biomass of djulis hulls and roots as natural antioxidant resources may be environmentally friendly and foreseeable. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sustainable Processes and Chemical Characterization of Natural Food Additives: Palmyra Palm (Borassus Flabellifer Linn.) Granulated Sugar
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2650; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12072650 - 27 Mar 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1443
Abstract
Palmyra palm (Borassus flabellifer Linn.) is an important sugar-producing plant that is widely distributed in tropical Asian countries. Its jaggery and sweet sap are prevalent in Cambodia as a substitute for table sugar. They contain essential minerals, vitamins, and biological compounds. We [...] Read more.
Palmyra palm (Borassus flabellifer Linn.) is an important sugar-producing plant that is widely distributed in tropical Asian countries. Its jaggery and sweet sap are prevalent in Cambodia as a substitute for table sugar. They contain essential minerals, vitamins, and biological compounds. We investigated the changes in the nutritional composition, antioxidant properties, and biological activity of palm granulated sugar prepared by using three different drying–solidification processes under vacuum conditions: the drying temperature was controlled at 80 °C, 90 °C, and 100 °C, and the drying time was 60, 75, and 90 min, respectively. Palm granulated sugar contains 10 kinds of vitamins (mainly vitamin E 52.15–55.12 mg/100 g), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (2.18 to 41.92 mg/100 g), and 38 volatile compounds that belong to the alcohol, ketones, pyrazines, acids, and phenols groups, and an aldehyde group. Moreover, palm granulated sugar exhibits a high total phenolic content (2.77–8.94 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g), 2,2-diphenyl-1-1picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (20.15%–37.88%), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) value (322.68–378.23 μmol Fe2+/mL). Furthermore, palm granulated sugar-treated NIH3T3 cells showed a higher cell viability of 18.10% to 23.68%. This study confirmed that palm granulated sugar prepared at 90 °C for 75 min can have a better product quality with increased vitamin and mineral contents, antioxidant properties, and biological activity, while also being low in 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Probiotics in Animal Husbandry: Applicability and Associated Risk Factors
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 1087; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12031087 - 04 Feb 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 1942
Abstract
Probiotics have been emerging as a safe and viable alternative to antibiotics for increasing performance in livestock. Literature was collated via retrieved information from online databases, viz, PubMed, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar. Besides improved immunomodulation and nutrient digestibility, [...] Read more.
Probiotics have been emerging as a safe and viable alternative to antibiotics for increasing performance in livestock. Literature was collated via retrieved information from online databases, viz, PubMed, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar. Besides improved immunomodulation and nutrient digestibility, in-feed probiotics have shown drastic reductions in gastrointestinal tract-invading pathogens. However, every novel probiotic strain cannot be assumed to share historical safety with conventional strains. Any strain not belonging to the wild-type distributions of relevant antimicrobials, or found to be harbouring virulence determinants, should not be developed further. Modes of identification and the transmigration potential of the strains across the gastrointestinal barrier must be scrutinized. Other potential risk factors include the possibility of promoting deleterious metabolic effects, excessive immune stimulation and genetic stability of the strains over time. Adverse effects of probiotics could be strain specific, depending on the prevailing immunological and physiological condition of the host. The most crucial concern is the stability of the strain. Probiotics stand a good chance of replacing antibiotics in animal husbandry. The possibility of the probiotics used in animal feed cross-contaminating the human food chain cannot be downplayed. Thus, the established safety measures in probiotic development must be adhered to for a successful global campaign on food safety and security. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2019

Jump to: 2021, 2020

Communication
Feruloylated Arabinoxylans from Maize Distiller’s Dried Grains with Solubles: Effect of Feruloyl Esterase on their Macromolecular Characteristics, Gelling, and Antioxidant Properties
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6449; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11226449 - 16 Nov 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 901
Abstract
Distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) are co-products of the maize ethanol industry. DDGS contains feruloylated arabinoxylans (AXs), which can present gelling, antioxidant, and health-promoting effects. However, AXs presenting high ferulic acid (FA) content can exhibit delayed fermentation by the colonic microbiota. Therefore, [...] Read more.
Distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) are co-products of the maize ethanol industry. DDGS contains feruloylated arabinoxylans (AXs), which can present gelling, antioxidant, and health-promoting effects. However, AXs presenting high ferulic acid (FA) content can exhibit delayed fermentation by the colonic microbiota. Therefore, partial deferuloylation of AXs from DDGS while preserving the polysaccharide gelling and antioxidant properties could add value and favor the sustainable development of bioethanol plants. The aim of this work was to partially deferuloylated AXs from DDGS using feruloyl esterase and to evaluate the polysaccharide macromolecular characteristics, gelling, and antioxidant properties. The AXs presented FA and FA dimer contents of 3.27 and 0.30 µg/mg polysaccharide, respectively, which decreased to 1.26 and 0.20 µg/mg polysaccharide, respectively, in feruloyl esterase-treated AXs (FAXs). The molecular weight and intrinsic viscosity of FAXs were slightly less than those of AXs. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data of AXs and FAXs were similar, confirming that the enzyme did not modify the polysaccharide molecular identity. FAX gels (2% w/v) exhibited a decrease in elasticity by 43% in relation to that of AXs gels. The antioxidant capacity of FAXs was reduced by 32% and 43% (DPPH and ABTS method, respectively), compared with that of AXs. The FAX gelling and antioxidant properties were -comparable to those reported for other AXs in the literature. Feruloyl esterase may offer an interesting approach for the design of functional FAXs as value-added products recovered from DDGS. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Quality and Safety of Pork Steak Marinated in Fermented Dairy Products and Sous-Vide Cooked
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5644; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11205644 - 13 Oct 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 977
Abstract
Consumers expect the appropriate tenderness, juiciness, and taste, a well as sufficiently long shelf life from meat subjected to thermal processing. One of the methods used to achieve this effect is sous-vide (SV). However, the low temperatures used in this method may not [...] Read more.
Consumers expect the appropriate tenderness, juiciness, and taste, a well as sufficiently long shelf life from meat subjected to thermal processing. One of the methods used to achieve this effect is sous-vide (SV). However, the low temperatures used in this method may not be sufficient to ensure the safety of the meat product. In order to increase safety and reduce adverse sensory changes, we suggest marinating the meat in fermented dairy products (FDP). The aim of the study was to determine the impact of marinating meat in FDP (kefir, yogurt, buttermilk), marinating time (3–12 days), and SV temperature (60 or 80 °C) on the quality and safety of pork steaks. Marinating the meat increases the level of loss during cooking, but at the same time, has no effect on the chemical composition and activity of water. The acidity of steaks decreases with the time of marinating. A few days of meat marinating in buttermilk or yogurt slows down the fat oxidation reactions and reduces the content of oxidizing substances in meat. Meat marinated in FDP and SV cooked contains acceptable microbial values. Marinating in FDP, especially in yogurt or buttermilk, improves the quality and safety of SV-cooked pork steaks. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Influence of Different Levels of Sodium Nitrite on the Safety, Oxidative Stability, and Color of Minced Roasted Beef
Sustainability 2019, 11(14), 3795; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11143795 - 11 Jul 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1208
Abstract
This study focuses on collecting actual data on the workable possibility of reducing the technological use of nitrites in beef products according to the present trends in nutrition, especially in terms of European Union (EU) food law. Measurements of safety by technological (pH [...] Read more.
This study focuses on collecting actual data on the workable possibility of reducing the technological use of nitrites in beef products according to the present trends in nutrition, especially in terms of European Union (EU) food law. Measurements of safety by technological (pH value, water activity, N-nitrosamine), microbiological, oxidative stability (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, oxidation-reduction potential), and color parameter (CIE L*a*b*, total heme pigment and heme iron) methods were taken after production and storage. The roasted beef with a reduced inclusion level of sodium nitrite (75 mg/kg and below) was more vulnerable to lipid oxidation. The quantities of primary lipid oxidation products were related to the sodium nitrite inclusion level (50–150 mg/kg). Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in any of the samples tested during all the experiments. The total count of Enterobacteriaceae increased with the decrease in sodium nitrite content, from log 2.75 cfu/g at the highest to log 6.03 cfu/g at the smallest addition of nitrite. The obtained results revealed that the addition of 100 mg/kg of sodium nitrite would be adequate for minced roasted beef, without significant unexpected effects on color, oxidative stability, and microbiological safety compared with the control (150 mg/kg). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Food Preservative Capabilities of Grape (Vitis vinifera) and Clementine Mandarin (Citrus reticulata) By-products Extracts in South Africa
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1746; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11061746 - 22 Mar 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2045
Abstract
The drive towards sustainable food systems coupled with increased consumer sophistication have prompted innovation in waste valorization. Grape and citrus processing by-products, abundant in the Mediterranean and tropical regions, respectively, are expanding and are sustainable sources of bioactive phytochemicals that can be used [...] Read more.
The drive towards sustainable food systems coupled with increased consumer sophistication have prompted innovation in waste valorization. Grape and citrus processing by-products, abundant in the Mediterranean and tropical regions, respectively, are expanding and are sustainable sources of bioactive phytochemicals that can be used as natural preservatives for foods. Phytochemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of extracts from grape pomace (GPE), seeds (GSE), and clementine mandarin peel and pulp (MPE) grown in South Africa were analyzed. Total phenols and carotenoids were highest in GPE followed by GSE and MPE (p ≤ 0.05). Flavonoids and anthocyanins were higher (p ≤ 0.05) in GPE and GSE compared to MPE. The GSE had the highest proanthocyanidins content followed by GPE and MPE (p ≤ 0.05). Ascorbic acid was only detected in MPE, which also had the highest titratable acidity and lowest pH values (p ≤ 0.05). The GSE had the highest antioxidant potency composite index followed by GPE and MPE (p ≤ 0.05). The order of antimicrobial activity of the extracts was MPE > GSE > GPE (p ≤ 0.05). Current findings show that GSE is a potential antioxidant while MPE holds promise as an antimicrobial for the food industry. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop