Special Issue "Sustainable Food Production and Urban Agriculture"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Christopher Robin Bryant
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: the adaptation of human activities to climatic change, especially agriculture; sustainable community development; rural development; land use planning; strategic management/planning of development including agriculture; community participation; the dynamics and planning of urban agriculture; including pioneer work on adaptation behavior under stressful conditions; sustainable transport policies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonia Bousbaine
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geography Department, University of Liège, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Liège, Belgium
Interests: the relationships between cities/countryside; the role of agriculture in the construction of these new territories in Wallonia (Belgium); the governance in these spaces; to reach more sustainability of agricultural land
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The idea of urban agriculture has been substantially changed over the last 6 years. The idea of urban agriculture has been substantially changed over the last 6 years. Today, urban agriculture is recognized as being present in urban agglomerations as well as in rural–urban fringes. When we analyze these areas, there is a multitude of environments in these urban areas both in developed countries and in developing countries. There is also a multitude of different types of food production in these urban areas ranging from community gardens and other types of gardens to urban farms with a hectare or two to much larger farms. These different forms of food production also have different types of relationships with consumers, ranging from food production in gardens for the families of the producers to farms with a network of consumers that are either informally or formally organized. The range of different types of food production units raises a significant question regarding how sustainable and healthy the food production is in this variety of environments. We are therefore interested in articles that investigate the degree of healthiness of food and the sustainability of its production in these different environments in urban areas, and how consumers have and can become involved in contributing to healthy and sustainable food production.

Prof. Dr. Christopher R. Bryant
Dr. Antonia Bousbaine
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Urban agriculture
  • Healthy foodstuff
  • Consumers’ roles in healthy food production
  • Variety of sustainable foodstuff processes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Urban Agriculture Oriented Community Planning and Spatial Modeling in Chinese Cities
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8735; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12208735 - 21 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
There are three main contradictions associated with urbanization: population growth and food demand, urban sprawl and production space, and production patterns and energy consumption. The pressure of urbanization has led to a mismatch between production and consumption in space and pattern. The current [...] Read more.
There are three main contradictions associated with urbanization: population growth and food demand, urban sprawl and production space, and production patterns and energy consumption. The pressure of urbanization has led to a mismatch between production and consumption in space and pattern. The current status and trends in urban food system planning illustrated that sustainable consumption and production were closely related to their spatial layout. The paper took a simulated sustainable food system in urban community as an example. It formulated a rational spatial planning strategy based on urban agriculture of different scales, technologies, and efficiencies, quantified productive community metrics to accommodate different scales of urban space, and wrote algorithms to develop a spatial model of a meta-cellular automaton that coupled consumer housing with productive surfaces. Finally, by comparing and optimizing the spatial patterns of multiple solutions, urban agriculture-oriented urban community planning was developed. The model was only a preliminary attempt at food system planning, but it explored the distribution patterns of housing and agriculture within a given territory in three steps: theoretical strategy-morphological simulation-planning design while meeting urban and productivity indicators. It demonstrated the feasibility of productive spaces and explored a planning strategy for urban communities that supports sustainable consumption and production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Production and Urban Agriculture)
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