sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Geospatial Analysis and Modeling of Urban Greening for Sustainability in Developing Countries"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Matamyo Simwanda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Copperbelt University, Kitwe 21692, Zambia
Interests: urban studies; urban geography; urban ecological assessments; environmental impact assessments; GIS; remote sensing; spatial analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Manjula Ranagalage
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Management, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Mihintale 50300, Sri Lanka
Interests: urban studies; remote sensing; GIS; spatial analysis; urban sustainability; urban heat island; urban climate; urban geography; green volume
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hao Hou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Remote Sensing and Earth Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Yuhangtang Road No.2318, Hangzhou 311121, China
Interests: urban studies; remote sensing; GIS; spatial analysis; urban sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urbanization rates of third world countries have been increasing during recent decades. Predictions show that the rate of urbanization will become much faster in developing countries in the future. Asian and African regions are becoming more critical due to their high population density and high level of urbanization. During the past decades, rapid and unplanned urbanization has negatively affected the decrease in vegetation cover in urban regions due to the expansion of impervious surfaces such as building, parking lots, pavements, and other constructions. These rapid changes in urban green space have negative impacts, including environmental pollution, climate change, fewer crops, increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, urban heat island, and breakdown of ecological cycles. Urban greening is becoming a hot issue due to the high level of negative impacts associated with urbanization. Hence, the use of geospatial analysis and modeling of urban greening will help to introduce proper sustainable urban planning in developing countries, especially for Asian and African cities.

During the past decades, many scholars have focused on the urban greening concept not only in developed countries but also in developing countries. Geospatial analysis provides fruitful outcomes on the studies related to the urban greening, not only regarding horizontal expansion but also the vertical growth of green space. The use of remote sensing data portrays spatial and temporal variation of the green space, and it can be useful to capture changing patterns and for future predictions. Thus, the modeling of urban green area/volume provides vital information and helps to develop sustainability at local, regional, and global levels.

In this Special Issue, we will focus on geospatial analysis and modeling of urban greening for sustainability in developing countries. We wish to showcase your research papers, case studies, conceptual or analytic reviews, and policy-relevant articles toward helping the efforts of achieving sustainability in urban areas in Asia and Africa.

Prof. Dr. Yuji Murayama
Dr. Matamyo Simwanda
Dr. Manjula Ranagalage
Dr. Hao Hou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Availability of GIS and Remote Sensing for urban green space/volume
  • Geospatial analysis of urban greening
  • Urban green volume
  • Prediction and modeling of the future urban green space/volume
  • Scenario analysis for green area/volume
  • Urban ecosystem services
  • Importance of urban greening concept for urban sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Measurement of 30-Year Urban Expansion Using Spatial Entropy in Changwon and Gimhae, Korea
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 632; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13020632 - 11 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 585
Abstract
Entropy is widely used for measuring the degree of urban sprawl. However, despite the intense use of the entropy concept in urban sprawl, entropy’s spatial context has been largely ignored. In this study, we analyzed urban sprawl in Changwon and Gimhae cities, as [...] Read more.
Entropy is widely used for measuring the degree of urban sprawl. However, despite the intense use of the entropy concept in urban sprawl, entropy’s spatial context has been largely ignored. In this study, we analyzed urban sprawl in Changwon and Gimhae cities, as they shared a common boundary but differed in their population growth and urban expansion. The land cover type, “urban and dry area,” was used to identify urban areas in the two cities, and a land cover map showed the areas of expansion in the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s. Different zoning schemes, namely concentric rings and regular partitioning, were applied. Shannon’s and Batty’s spatial entropy indices were used to measure urban sprawl. The results showed that concentric ring zoning was not suitable for measuring urban sprawl in a decentralized and polycentric city. Batty’s spatial entropy was less affected by the zoning scheme used and reflected the pattern of urban expansion more accurately. Urban sprawl, a phenomenon occurring within a spatial context, can be better understood by measuring spatial entropy with appropriate zoning schemes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Effects of Green Space Patterns on Urban Thermal Environment at Multiple Spatial–Temporal Scales
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6850; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12176850 - 24 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 795
Abstract
Land use/land cover (LULC) pattern change due to human activity is one of the key components of regional and global climate change drivers. Urban green space plays a critical role in regulating urban thermal environment, and its cooling effect has received widespread attention [...] Read more.
Land use/land cover (LULC) pattern change due to human activity is one of the key components of regional and global climate change drivers. Urban green space plays a critical role in regulating urban thermal environment, and its cooling effect has received widespread attention in urban heat island (UHI) related studies. To fully understand the effects of the landscape pattern of an urban green space in regulating the urban thermal environment, it is necessary to further study the thermal effects of the landscape pattern of the urban green space and its characteristics under varied spatial–temporal scales. In this paper, we took the urban core area of Hangzhou City as the study area and analyzed the relationships between the landscape metrics of the urban green space and land surface temperature (LST) under varied spatial scales by using correlation analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA) methods. Multi-temporal Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor data were used to retrieve the spatial and temporal dynamics of LSTs in four consecutive seasons, and the land use classification was interpreted using SPOT (Systeme Probatoire d’Observation de la Terre) satellite imagery. The results showed that landscape dominance metrics—e.g., percentage of landscape (PLAND) and largest patch index (LPI)—were the most influential factors on urban LST. The spatial configuration of urban landscape, as represented by the fragmentation and aggregation and connectedness, also showed significant effects on LST. Furthermore, landscape pattern metrics had varied spatial scale effects on LST. Specifically, the landscape dominance metrics of urban forest showed an increased influence on LST as the spatial scale increased, while for urban water, the trend was opposite. These findings might have some practical significance for urban planning about how to spatially arrange urban green space to alleviate UHI at local and regional scales. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop