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Special Issue "The Imbalances in the Urban Growth of 21st Century Cities: Case Studies, Innovative Approaches and New Emerging Phenomena"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, 55% of people in the world live in cities. According to the UN, this figure will increase to 68% in 2050. Human migration and the new economic models imposed by globalization are profoundly changing the physiognomy and configuration of our cities. Accelerated urban sprawl, suburbanization, gentrification, favelization, etc. are relatively recent phenomena that have been standardized in many of the main cities of the planet during the last few decades. Nevertheless, many medium-sized cities are currently experiencing phenomena of this nature as a result of imbalances in their urban growth patterns. This Special Issue seeks contributions involving relevant experiences and case studies, innovative frameworks, or new analysis methodologies in topics such as:

  • imbalances in urban growth;
  • urban sprawl processes in megacities;
  • spatial analysis of city development patterns;
  • uncontrolled urban phenomena (suburbanization, favelization, etc.);
  • gentrification and new socioeconomic urban trends;
  • rural–urban migration phenomena; and
  • urban transformations related to new types of mass tourism (e.g. Airbnb).

References:

Aguilar, A. G. Peri-urbanization, illegal settlements and environmental impact in Mexico City. Cities 2008, 25, 133 145

Arribas-Bel, D.; Nijkamp, P.; Scholten, H. Multidimensional urban sprawl in Europe: A self-organizing map approach. Comput. Environ. Urban Syst. 2011, 35, 263–275

Espina, J.M.; Mori, S.; Nomura, R. An Analysis of Environment Behavior Relationships towards the Design of a Local Mixed-used Street: Based on Behavior Settings of Belgium Street in Cebu City, Philippines. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3230.

Ewing, R. Is Los Angeles-Style Sprawl Desirable? J. Am. Plan. Assoc. 1997, 63, 107–126.

Do, D.T.; Mori, S.; Nomura, R. A Comparative Study of User Behaviors on Unimproved and Improved Street Spaces in Da Nang, Vietnam. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3457.

García-Ayllón, S. Rapid development as a factor of imbalance in urban growth of cities in Latin America: A perspective based on territorial indicators. Habitat Int. 2016, 58, 127-142

Garcia-Ayllon, S. Urban Transformations as an Indicator of Unsustainability in the P2P Mass Tourism Phenomenon: The Airbnb Case in Spain through Three Case Studies. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2933.

García-Ayllón, S. Retro-diagnosis methodology for land consumption analysis towards sustainable future scenarios: Application to a Mediterranean coastal area. J. Clean. Prod. 2018, 195, 1408–1421.

Garcia-Ayllon, S. Urban transformations as indicators of economic change in post-communist Eastern Europe: Territorial diagnosis through five case studies. Habitat Int. 2018, 71, 29-37

Sun, J.; Liu, L.; Müller, K.; Zander, P.; Ren, G.; Yin, G.; Hu, Y. Surplus or Deficit? Spatiotemporal Variations of the Supply, Demand, and Budget of Landscape Services and Landscape Multifunctionality in Suburban Shanghai, China. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3752.

Wang, Y.; Shaw, D.; Yuan, K. Gated Neighborhoods, Privatized Amenities and Fragmented Society: Evidence from Residential Experience and Implications for Urban Planning. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4301.

Dr. Salvador García-Ayllón Veintimilla
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban growth patterns
  • megacity urbanization
  • unbalanced urban sprawl
  • suburbanization
  • gentrification
  • smart city planning
  • rural–urban migration
  • territorial sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Design of a Development Index for Spanish Municipalities
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8910; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12218910 - 27 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 616
Abstract
Currently, the demographic vacuum and poor development suffered by most areas of Spain are some of the most worrying issues from a territorial point of view, which is why this study is necessary. In this paper, the objective is to create a Development [...] Read more.
Currently, the demographic vacuum and poor development suffered by most areas of Spain are some of the most worrying issues from a territorial point of view, which is why this study is necessary. In this paper, the objective is to create a Development Index with which to study the different realities of rural and urban spaces through demographic and socioeconomic variables of the Spanish municipalities. Principal Component Analysis is carried out, with whose results the index has been prepared. This is then explored with a Spatial Autocorrelation Analysis. The results show that most developed Spanish municipalities and most of the population are concentrated in coastal areas and in the main cities of the country. In opposition, there are interior rural areas with less developed municipalities at risk of disappearance due to their increasing ages and levels of depopulation. Thus, in this paper, new variables and methods are used in the study of the social and economic diversity of rural and urban areas, verifying the inequality that still exists between both. Full article
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Article
Does Population Mobility Contribute to Urbanization Convergence? Empirical Evidence from Three Major Urban Agglomerations in China
Sustainability 2020, 12(2), 458; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12020458 - 07 Jan 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 966
Abstract
Population mobility accelerates urbanization convergence and mitigates the negative impact of the spatial agglomeration effect on urbanization convergence, which is the most important conclusion in this paper. Taking 38 cities in China’s three urban agglomerations (the Yangtze River Delta, the Pearl River Delta, [...] Read more.
Population mobility accelerates urbanization convergence and mitigates the negative impact of the spatial agglomeration effect on urbanization convergence, which is the most important conclusion in this paper. Taking 38 cities in China’s three urban agglomerations (the Yangtze River Delta, the Pearl River Delta, and the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region) from 2005 to 2016 as research subjects, the study first shows that there is a large gap in the level of urbanization between the three major urban agglomerations, but the gap has been constantly narrowed and presents a trend of absolute convergence and conditional convergence. Furthermore, without adding a population mobility variable, the combination of the diffusion effect of high-urbanization cities and the high growth rate of low-urbanization cities causes the inter-regional urbanization level to be continuously convergent in the Yangtze River Delta region; however, the combination of the agglomeration effect of high-urbanization cities and the high growth rate of low-urbanization cities causes the inter-regional urbanization to be divergent in the Pearl River Delta and the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region. Under the influence of population mobility, the “catch-up” effect in low-urbanization regions is greater than the agglomeration effect in high-urbanization regions, which promotes the continuous convergence of inter-regional urbanization. Full article
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