Special Issue "Landscape Planning and Management in Europe: Methods, Tools and Approaches"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anna Maria Colavitti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DICAAR, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Via Santa Croce 67, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: landscape planning; cultural heritage; urban and regional planning; urban and territorial policies; urban renewal and regeneration
Prof. Dr. Chiara Garau
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture (DICAAR), University of Cagliari, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: smart cities; urban and regional planning; participatory processes; cultural heritage; smart tourism; urban governance; urban policies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sergio Serra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DICAAR, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Via Santa Croce 67, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: urban and regional planning; landscape planning; cultural heritage; ecosystem services; land use planning; urban regeneration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Landscape has become a key issue for urban and regional planning after the 2000 European Landscape Convention (ELC), which defines it “as perceived by people, whose character is the result of the action and interaction of natural and/or human factors of a territory”. We refer to a complex concept that involves environmental, cultural, and social factors belonging to different types of natural and urban landscapes. It is the task of public institutions to identify the specific characteristics of a landscape and to assess the natural and cultural values shared by local communities. Through spatial planning, landscape quality objectives are defined and linked to a set of actions for the enhancement, conservation, and regeneration of the landscape. In the European countries that have signed and ratified the ELC, different policies and planning tools have been adopted as well as different methods of landscape quality assessment. In Italy, the 2004 Code for Cultural Heritage and Landscape underlines the status of landscape as a public good, whose protection and conservation is up to the central state which, together with the regional authorities, defines policies and strategies for its valorization and recovery into Regional Landscape Plans (RLPs). Landscape planning is therefore a tool for the development and application of successful landscape strategies, policies, and projects to improve the quality of life of the local communities in urban or rural contexts. An important innovation concerns the attempt to overcome the binding and regulatory approach, usually focused on protection constraints, in order to generate a high awareness about the identity value of the territorial capital and to encourage a democratic community involvement in the development of conservation and enhancement policies. The ELC introduces innovative planning tools but also aims to stimulate changes in the institutional and legislative framework, not only at regional and national levels, but also at local ones. While on the one hand, municipal administrations have acquired greater awareness of the role of the landscape as a driving factor for the socioeconomic development of the territory, on the other side, they find considerable difficulties in the implementation of strategies and actions at closest local level due to the ineffectiveness of municipal urban plans to determine real effects in the landscape regeneration. This Special Issue focuses on the methods and criteria to transfer the landscape quality objectives from the territorial level—usually the regional one—to the most suitable local scale for the management and governance of the landscape in its different forms. Landscape planning also acts on the wide range of ecosystem services that are fundamental to human wellbeing and are under pressure from economic, social, and environmental changes in addition to unsustainable land use. Once again, this issue is most clearly evident on a local scale and requires addressing through an integrated approach to spatial planning in relation to urban and landscape aspects.

This Special Issue encourages contributions on the topic of landscape planning and management, related (but not limited) to the discussion of different methods, tools, and approaches or experiences on the national and international scale. Theoretical and methodological papers as well as case studies are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Anna Maria Colavitti
Prof. Dr. Chiara Garau
Dr. Sergio Serra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Landscape planning theories
  • Landscape planning tools
  • Landscape analysis methods
  • Landscape quality objectives
  • Local landscape strategies
  • Assessment of ecological and landscape values
  • Regional landscape planning
  • Landscape observatory
  • Landscape management
  • Landscape regeneration
  • Landscape in the local planning
  • Public participation
  • Ecosystem services
  • Cultural heritage
  • Green infrastructures
  • Sustainable land use

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Mind the Gap: Why the Landscape Planning System in Sardinia Does Not Work
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7300; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13137300 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 377
Abstract
In Italy, after the introduction of the Code of Cultural Heritage and Landscape in 2004, the Regional Landscape Plan (RLP) has acquired a coordination role in the urban planning system, for the implementation of policies for landscape protection and valorisation. The case study [...] Read more.
In Italy, after the introduction of the Code of Cultural Heritage and Landscape in 2004, the Regional Landscape Plan (RLP) has acquired a coordination role in the urban planning system, for the implementation of policies for landscape protection and valorisation. The case study of the RLP of Sardinia is a paradigmatic application to the coastal area of the island, which is considered most vulnerable and subject to settlement pressure. The objectives of preservation and valorisation of the territorial resources should be transferred into local planning instruments by adopting strategies aimed at the preservation of the consolidated urban fabric, at the requalification and completion of the existing built-up areas according to the principles of land take limitation and increase in urban quality. The paper investigates the state of implementation and the level of integration of landscape contents in the local plans that have been adapted to the RLP, using a qualitative comparative method. In addition, the results of the plan coherence checks, elaborated by the regional monitoring bodies after the adaptation process, have been analysed to identify the common criticalities and weaknesses. The results highlight the lack of effectiveness of the RLP, after more than a decade since its approval, considering the limited number of adequate local plans and the poor quality of their analytical and regulative contents in terms of landscape protection and valorisation. Conclusions suggest some possible ways to revise the RLP, focusing on the participation of local communities and the development of a new landscape culture. Full article
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