Special Issue "Public Value Capture"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andreas Hendricks
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sc., Institue of Geodesy, Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg, Germany
Interests: land management; real estate valuation; land policy; public value capture
Prof. Dr. Vida Maliene
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
2. Institute of Land Management and Geomatics, Vytautas Magnus University Agriculture Academy, Akademija, Lithuania
Interests: land management and economics; real estate valuation; sustainable and affordable housing; urban regeneration and sustainable communities; public value capture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Andreas Ortner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geodetic Institute, Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden), Dresden, Germany
Interests: spatial location assessment and housing markets; land management and climate change; land management for sustainable development of urban-rural relations; innovative approaches to services of general interest in rural areas; spatial planning
Prof. Dr. Erwin van der Krabben
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Management Research, Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Radboud University, Heyendaalseweg 141, 6500HK Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Interests: land policy; value capture; urban transformation; business parks; retail trade policy; site development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sonia Guelton
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Paris School of Urban Planning, University of Paris East Créteil, LAB’URBA, F-94010 Créteil, France
Interests: urban economics; land economics and management; public policies; local public finance; territorial development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The shortage of financial resources is a worldwide problem. Coming out of the economic and financial crisis, countries as well as municipalities have decreasing means to fulfil all their public commitments. Urbanization requires increasing funding for public infrastructure and services, which, in most cases, leads in turn to rising land prices for urban properties. So, should those who benefit from it share some of the costs? How would that effect development and progress? What are the most appropriate ways to do so?

The Special Issue aims to focus on three main aspects of Public Value Capture of Increasing Property Values:

  • Common Framework: Land and its value play a crucial role for social activities and development. Therefore, increasing property values have deep social, economic, and distributive justice implications. Defining which value should remain in which hands is a normative issue with philosophical and political implications. Thus, it has to be considered how property in general has been constructed in the law, political philosophy, and constitution of a country, as well as in the development of the theory of location and ground rent. European countries have developed under philosophical references and settled their own range of property rights in accordance with the dominant political trends and social acceptance. Looking at different systems could help to propose new solutions for the creation of a common framework.
  • Innovative Tools: Tools which are used in many countries are: fees and taxes, a “real estate consortium” (joint development of public authorities and private land owners), a negotiated development (between developer and municipality), flexible building rights (exceptions to the general use regulations in favour of investors or property owners who paid a certain amount of money), the urban development or redevelopment measure (for the new development of urban areas or elimination of urban deficits), interim acquisition (build-up of land stocks by municipalities) and contract models (agreement of certain duties of the private partner in return to subsequent building rights). The design of the tools and their application varies from country to country. It is important to determine which implementations can be considered as innovative and forward-looking.
  • Allocation of Development Costs and Benefits: Land values are determined by several factors—i.e., it is a result of both public and private investments and actions. A conceptual delineation of these elements can facilitate the discussion of who should capture what. Through new tools of public value capture, further possibilities for increasing financial resources for public duties (due to the discharge of the public budget concerning costs of infrastructure) can be opened up.

Dr. Andreas Hendricks
Dr. Vida Maliene
Dr. Andreas Ortner
Prof. Dr. Erwin van der Krabben
Prof. Dr. Sonia Guelton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • public value capture terminology
  • public value capture framework
  • tools of public of value capture
  • cost allocation of captured value
  • beneficiaries of captured value

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Limits of Negotiable Developer Obligations
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11364; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su132011364 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 241
Abstract
Many local authorities apply public value capture on new developments to cover the costs of additional public services. The development obligations (DO) they apply can be either negotiable (NDO) or non-negotiable (NNDO). This article examines the limits of NDOs by comparing three national [...] Read more.
Many local authorities apply public value capture on new developments to cover the costs of additional public services. The development obligations (DO) they apply can be either negotiable (NDO) or non-negotiable (NNDO). This article examines the limits of NDOs by comparing three national case studies according to the basic principles of proportionality, causality, connection, and lack of transparency for developers. Well-developed building land models and a delineation of applicable cost types offer more transparency for the developer and enable the municipal authorities to establish a fairer distribution of burdens based on actual benefit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Value Capture)
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Article
Increase in the Value Added of Land Due to the Establishment of Industrial Parks
Sustainability 2021, 13(15), 8541; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13158541 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 443
Abstract
Industrial parks (IPs) are a frequently used regional policy tool to increase economic viability and social equality. Successful functioning of such areas can increase land use efficiency and, by attracting investment, create high added value nationwide. However, the creation of IPs requires significant [...] Read more.
Industrial parks (IPs) are a frequently used regional policy tool to increase economic viability and social equality. Successful functioning of such areas can increase land use efficiency and, by attracting investment, create high added value nationwide. However, the creation of IPs requires significant initial investments in the installation of their infrastructure and the preparation of plots of land, which is often realized through public financial instruments. The overall objective of the research is to present the different strategies for IP development in three different countries’ economies, to discuss the outputs and added value created by such areas, and to provide insights and suggestions for the planning and development of efficient industrial land as well as to increase its value in the developing and middle-income countries. To achieve these aims, the authors of the research present and analyze IP development practices and policy tools in the developed countries of Lithuania and Portugal, and provide suggestions for the developing country of Ukraine. In this study, the authors use statistical and spatial GIS and economic data, and analyze and compare them. The results show that IPs are being developed all over Europe and the world, but each country is creating its own legal framework and appropriate incentives for companies operating in these areas, so the performance of such areas varies a great deal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Value Capture)
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Article
Value Capture and Vertical Allocations of Public Amenities
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3952; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13073952 - 02 Apr 2021
Viewed by 616
Abstract
This paper describes and critically reviews an important but under-theorized value capture mechanism that we have termed “vertical allocations” (or vertical exactions). This mechanism enables cities to capture value vertically by allocating floor space for public utilities in privately owned, mixed-use, vertical development. [...] Read more.
This paper describes and critically reviews an important but under-theorized value capture mechanism that we have termed “vertical allocations” (or vertical exactions). This mechanism enables cities to capture value vertically by allocating floor space for public utilities in privately owned, mixed-use, vertical development. As a value capture tool, vertical allocations allow the government to tap value uplift to supply the nearby neighborhood, and the city as a whole, with much needed public services. The owner or developer is required to make in-kind contributions in the form of spaces provided for a range of public facilities such as schools, preschools, community centers, and public medical clinics. While focusing on vertical exactions in Israel we explore how a certain share of land/floorspace can be allocated for public amenities in a given project. There are several legal pathways for securing public floorspace including negotiated agreements, land readjustment and expropriation. The findings show that unclear policies and regulations could create frictions between developers and municipalities, and these raise the nexus question as well as debates about construction costs and financial contributions developers have to make. Specifically, the paper finds that while developers often argue that cities should cover the costs of constructing public floorspace, city officials assert that the costs should be borne by the owners and developers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Value Capture)
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