Special Issue "Recent Advances in Soil Heavy Metals Remediation, Soil Fertility Management and Crops Productivity: Changing Climatic Conditions"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Muhammad Arif Ali
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, 60800 Pakistan
Interests: environment; soil fertility; plant nutrition; soil science; nutrient cycling; biofertilizers; soil microbiology; soil ecology; phosphorus; inoculation; zinc; mycorrhiza fungi
Dr. Shah Fahad
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430060, China
2. Department of Agronomy, The University of Haripur, Haripur 22620, Pakistan
Interests: soil science; agricultural plant science; agronomy; temperature stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Valerie Vranová
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 3, 61300 Brno, Czech Republic
Interests: agricultural and biological Sciences
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Dr. Rahul Datta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Pedology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, 61300 Brno, Czech Republic
Interests: soil fauna microbial interaction; soil enzymes; soil nutrient cycling; soil remediation; sustainable agriculture; organo-mineral interactions; carbon sequestration in the soil; biochar; biofertilizers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil contamination by heavy metals is a major environmental issue. Many meteorological factors, i.e., temperature, humidity, and precipitation, directly affect heavy metals exposure in our environment. Furthermore, anthropogenic activities are also playing an essential role in the development of heavy metals toxicity. Field applicability of different remediation technologies mostly encountered various obstacles, such. Scientists are trying to introduce new techniques for increasing the yield of crops without disturbing the environment. Integrated approaches for remediation of heavy metals as pollutants and improving soil fertility status under changing climatic conditions are gaining attention. The use of organic amendments and biofertilizers can immobilization these heavy metals in soil. They can also improve the bioavailability of macro and micronutrients by improving the physio-chemical properties of soil. Cultivation of hyperaccumulators can effectively remove the heavy metals contaminants in polluted lands. They can also facilitate the proliferation of heavy metals resistant microorganisms in the rhizosphere that have the potential to change the transition state of toxic metals. The issue of heavy metals and poor fertility level needs serious and more scientific attention. That’s why we invite researchers to contribute to the Special Issue on Recent Advances in Soil Heavy Metals Remediation and Soil Fertility Management: Changing Climatic Conditions, which intended to serve as a unique multidisciplinary forum covering broad aspects of meteorological stress generating factors, environmental science, soil fertility and detoxification of hazardous heavy metals. This Special Issue, “Recent Advances in Soil Heavy Metals Remediation and Soil Fertility Management: Changing Climatic Conditions" aims to fill the gaps in the scientific literature concerning this crucial area as much as possible, to highlight its importance, and to provide a platform for the dissemination of state-of-the-art advances in this field.

Please

(1) Heavy metals remediation technologies

(2) Use of inorganic fertilizers with organic amendments

(3) Climatic changes and soil heavy metals contamination

(4) Improvement in fertilizer use efficiency under changing climate

(5) Response of different crops towards nutrients deficiency and heavy metals toxicity

Dr. Subhan Danish
Dr. Muhammad Arif Ali
Dr. Shah Fahad
Dr. Valerie Vranová
Dr. Rahul Datta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heavy metals
  • fertilizers
  • manures
  • compost
  • biochar
  • mulching
  • biocontrol agents
  • chemical controlling agents
  • agronomic practices
  • crops growth and productivity
  • ethylene

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Alleviating Role of Gibberellic Acid in Enhancing Plant Growth and Stimulating Phenolic Compounds in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) under Lead Stress
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 12329; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su132112329 - 08 Nov 2021
Viewed by 413
Abstract
Toxicity of heavy-metals in soil is a major constraint for the production of carrots (Daucus carota L.). Different plant growth regulators are being used to overcome this problem. It has been found that plant growth regulators induce stress tolerance in plants. In [...] Read more.
Toxicity of heavy-metals in soil is a major constraint for the production of carrots (Daucus carota L.). Different plant growth regulators are being used to overcome this problem. It has been found that plant growth regulators induce stress tolerance in plants. In this study, the role of exogenously applied plant growth regulator, gibberellic acid (GA3) was examined in soil grown two carrot cultivars under four different levels of lead (0, 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg) with one level of gibberellic acid (50 ppm). Results showed that Pb stress retarded the plant growth and reduced chlorophyll contents in the leaves of both carrot cultivars. A significant decrease was observed in photosynthetic attributes by Pb addition alone. However, exogenously applied GA3 ameliorated the plant growth and chlorophyll contents in the leaves of both carrot cultivars under Pb stressed conditions. Moreover, GA3 also decreased the uptake of Pb concentration in carrot leaves and roots. In addition, GA3 significantly regulated the phenolic compounds concentration in both carrot cultivars under Pb stress. In this study, cultivar T-29 was found to be more tolerant to Pb stress, however, cultivar Mevarick experienced higher damage regarding plant growth under Pb stress. Full article
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Article
Alleviation of Cadmium Phytotoxicity Using Silicon Fertilization in Wheat by Altering Antioxidant Metabolism and Osmotic Adjustment
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11317; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su132011317 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 391
Abstract
Humans are facing very serious health threats from food contamination with cadmium (Cd), and Cd uptake by wheat is amongst the main causes of Cd entrance into the food chain. The current study examined the effect of foliar application (0, 1.50, 3.00 and [...] Read more.
Humans are facing very serious health threats from food contamination with cadmium (Cd), and Cd uptake by wheat is amongst the main causes of Cd entrance into the food chain. The current study examined the effect of foliar application (0, 1.50, 3.00 and 4.00 mM) of various silicate chemicals (calcium silicate and potassium silicate) on wheat growth and Cd addition by wheat under Cd stress 20 mg kg−1 of soil using CdCl2. The results revealed that under control conditions, the application of Si improved all the growth, physiological, biochemical and quality attributes by reducing malondialdehyde contents and electrolyte leakage. Under Cd stress, the supplementation of Si conferred a better growth rate, gaseous exchange for metabolic activity and maintained the tissues’ turgor and membranes’ stabilities compared to those obtained under control (without Si). The enzymatic activities (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase) also show rapid action by the application of Si supplement, which were associated with elevated osmoprotectant contents and antioxidants, having role in antioxidant defense against Cd stress. These results suggested that a 4.50 mM concentration of Si supplement (potassium silicate) works effectively against Cd stress. The given results showed that Si supplement is beneficial for the enhancement of many metabolic activities that takes places in plants during the growth period that proved a feasible approach in controlling the Cd concentration within wheat plants and, ultimately, in humans. Full article
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Article
Supplemental Effects of Biochar and Foliar Application of Ascorbic Acid on Physio-Biochemical Attributes of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) under Cadmium-Contaminated Soil
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9128; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13169128 - 14 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 771
Abstract
Biochar, prepared from organic waste materials, can improve the quality of contaminated soil areas. Biochar can be used as an economic centerpiece over other available resources and can properly utilize large amounts of waste. Soil contaminated with cadmium (Cd) is a worldwide problem [...] Read more.
Biochar, prepared from organic waste materials, can improve the quality of contaminated soil areas. Biochar can be used as an economic centerpiece over other available resources and can properly utilize large amounts of waste. Soil contaminated with cadmium (Cd) is a worldwide problem that poses potential agricultural and human health hazards. Moreover, Cd toxicity causes serious problems for sustainable food production, especially in food crops like barley. High cadmium concentration in soil is phytotoxic and decreases plant growth and ultimately yields. Biochar and ascorbic acid in ameliorating Cd stress are economically compatible and consistent approaches in agriculture. The present study aimed to evaluate biochar’s and foliar-applied ascorbic acid’s influence on some growth and biochemical characteristics of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to Cd stress. The soil was supplemented with biochar 2% w/w and 20 mg Cd kg−1. The foliar application of 30 mM ascorbic acid was done on plants. The results revealed that Cd stress decreased chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, and carotenoids. It also increased oxidative stress indicators, i.e., APX, COD, POD, flavonoids, anthocyanin, phenolics, and electrolyte leakage, in barley with Cd-contamination. A significant enhancement in root and shoot length, gas exchange attributes, and chlorophyll contents validated the effectiveness of Bio + Asa treatments over all other treatments under Cd contamination. In conclusion, the sole applications of biochar and Asa in Cd contamination are also effective, but Bio + Asa is a better amendment for Cd stress alleviation in barley plants. Full article
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