Special Issue "Slow Cities: Time and Spaces in Post-globalization. Economic, Social and Environmental Challenges"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francesca Salvo
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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering,University of Calabria, Italy
Interests: real estate appraisal; environmental damage assessment; cultural heritage valuation; geographic information systems
Dr. Manuela De Ruggiero
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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Calabria, Italy
Interests: real estate appraisal; real estate appraisal applied to tourist dynamics; building information modeling; geographic information systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is commonly known that the rhythms of daily life have been accelerating at a steady rate in recent decades, creating an attitude that values time-saving over everything else.

However, this way of interpreting reality is now beginning to show its limits and contradictions, the most evident manifestation of which is the emotional tension that accompanies economic and social behaviors, always perceived as inefficient with respect to the demands of quick living. The COVID-19 pandemic event has definitely further exasperated emotional experiences, imposing a critical analysis on accelerated models and an openness towards slow ones.

In the age of speed, in which time never seems to be enough, the philosophy of “slowing down” has begun to emerge. It seems, thus, appropriate to redesign the relationship among people, technological innovations, and the built environment, recomposing their space–time distances in such a way that, while allowing freedom from physical obstacles and a great ability to move and act, it also allows people to find the right rhythm of life.

A perspective that recalls the triad of the sustainable development—environmental, social, and economic issues—intends to ensure the present generation’s satisfaction of needs without compromising the possibility for future generations to satisfy their own. Formal and informal movements have multiplied, promoting and pursuing ideas and actions that can be traced back to the principle of living slowly.

Among these, a key role in the perspective of sustainability is played by the movement of slow cities, the international city network of good living.

The slow cities movement promotes and spreads the culture of good living through research, experimentation, and application of solutions for city organization aimed at the enhancement of the “slow qualities”, which are necessary to create livability, to protect and to safeguard environment and cultural heritage and, above all, to enhance territorial identities.

The movement proposes an urban model based on the logic of sustainable urban development, based on the ability to regenerate nonreproducible environmental resources and to reduce soil consumption, through policies aiming to recover and redevelop the existing city, to incentivize environmental compatibility of the infrastructure system, to achieve solutions of “sustainable mobility”, and to recover fringes of social and economic marginality.

The movement devotes ample space to the many issues related to the environment and its protection, from sustainable urban planning to energy consumption savings, and from efficient transport to quality tourism, at the same time also dedicating additional room to social, cultural, and educational emergencies.

It is a challenge that involves all sciences and that through communication and interdisciplinary exchange must be able to use analysis and synthesis to preserve and to enhance territory, landscape, environment, and cities.

Prof. Dr. Francesca Salvo
Dr. Manuela De Ruggiero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Globalization
  • Slow cities
  • Sustainability
  • Urban planning
  • Appraisal and economy
  • Quality of life
  • Cultural heritage
  • Social emergency

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Economic Convenience Judgments among Seismic Risk Mitigation Measures and Regulatory and Fiscal Provisions: The Italian Case
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3269; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063269 - 16 Mar 2021
Viewed by 373
Abstract
The age of the Italian building heritage has prompted the Government to implement regulatory measures aimed at mitigating the seismic risk, encouraging anti-seismic interventions on residential buildings through specific tax benefits. This work intends to analyze the economic convenience associated with these building [...] Read more.
The age of the Italian building heritage has prompted the Government to implement regulatory measures aimed at mitigating the seismic risk, encouraging anti-seismic interventions on residential buildings through specific tax benefits. This work intends to analyze the economic convenience associated with these building transformations from an appraisal perspective, proposing an analysis methodology aimed at evaluating the increase in market value of the transformed properties, and at identifying the most convenient among the various feasible interventions. The application to a case study allows highlighting the net economic benefits in the owners’ portfolios able to compensate the logistical inconveniences associated with this type of intervention, soliciting a greater awareness of seismic risk, and favoring private initiative at a widespread level. Full article
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Article
Automated Valuation Methods through the Cost Approach in a BIM and GIS Integration Framework for Smart City Appraisals
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7546; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12187546 - 13 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1204
Abstract
The principle behind sustainable city movements is represented by the idea of “good living”, which is the possibility of having solutions and services that allow citizens to live in an easy, simple, and enjoyable way. Policies for urban quality play a central role [...] Read more.
The principle behind sustainable city movements is represented by the idea of “good living”, which is the possibility of having solutions and services that allow citizens to live in an easy, simple, and enjoyable way. Policies for urban quality play a central role in the slow cities manifesto, often suggesting the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ITC) in the development of interactive services for citizens. Among these, an interesting possibility is to offer citizens digital real estate consultancy services through the implementation of automated evaluation methods. An automated appraisal action—which is already complex in itself owing to the need to collect data in a consistent, standardized, but also differentiated way so as to require the adoption of real estate due diligence—collides on the operational level with the concrete difficulty of acquiring necessary data, much more so since the reference market is dark, atypical, and viscous. These operational difficulties are deepened by the epistemological nature of the appraisal discipline itself, which bases its methodology on the forecast postulate, recalling the need to objectify as much as possible the evaluation from the perspective of an intersubjective sharing argument. These circumstances have led, on the one hand, to the definition of internationally accepted uniform evaluation rules (IVS, 2017) and, on the other, to the testing of automated valuation methods aimed at returning computer-based appraisals (AVM). Starting from the awareness that real estate valuation refers essentially to information and georeferences, this paper aims to demonstrate how real estate appraisal analysis can be further improved through information technology (IT), directing real estate valuation towards objectivity in compliance with international valuation standards. Particularly, the paper intends to show the potential of combining geographic information systems (GISs) and building information models (BIMs) in automated valuation methods through the depreciated reproduction cost. The paper also proposes a BIM-GIS semi-automatic prototype based on the depreciated reconstruction cost through an experimentation in Rende (Italy). Full article
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