Special Issue "Solid Waste Management and International Cooperation in Low-Middle Income and Developing Countries: A Step Forward Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Navarro Ferronato
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences (DiSTA), University of Insubria, Via G.B. Vico 46, I-21100 Varese, Italy
Interests: solid waste management; sustainability; international cooperation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solid waste management is a social, environmental, and economic issue worldwide due to the difficulties involved in waste collection, treatment and final disposal, public involvement, financial sustainability, and policy support. Such issues are of increased importance in low and low-middle income countries, where the lack of economic resources, technical knowledge, and public awareness increase the environmental contamination and spread of diseases due to waste mismanagement. For improving sustainable development at a global level, the appropriate management of solid waste should be addressed since developing countries are increasing in population and waste generation, although controlled disposal does not exceed the 68% of waste collected, and the collection coverage is lower than 85%.

International cooperation among universities, non-governmental organizations (NGO), private companies, associations, and governments, among other actors, could help start development projects to overcome economic and technical barriers in developing contexts.

This Special Issue aims to collect research and case studies of solid waste management in low and low-middle income regions, with a special focus on but not limited to the international cooperation framework. The implementation of small-scale treatment plants, the analysis of social behaviour, the implementation of collection and selective collection plans, the analysis of current and future scenarios through multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and life-cycle assessment (LCA), the evaluation of reliable solutions for waste treatment and possible waste valorisation, the application of pilot projects and actions in developing cities or rural areas, and strategies for reducing waste open dumping and open burning are the topics addressed in this Special Issue.

All waste fractions are welcome to be analysed, from municipal solid waste (recyclable and non-recyclable, organic and inorganic, and hazardous and non-hazardous), to healthcare waste, construction and demolition waste, used tyres, agricultural waste, waste of electric and electronic equipment, among others. Moreover, the analysis of the informal recycling sector, as well as studies evaluating the involvement of waste pickers and scavengers in waste-selective collection systems, are encouraged to be published in this Special Issue.

Therefore, we invite you to contribute to this Issue by submitting comprehensive reviews, original case studies, or research articles.

Prof. Vincenzo Torretta
Dr. Navarro Ferronato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Waste mismanagement
  • Informal recycling
  • Waste pickers
  • Open dumping
  • Recycling
  • Best available technologies

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Situation, Challenges, and Solutions of Policy Implementation on Municipal Waste Management in Vietnam toward Sustainability
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3517; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063517 - 22 Mar 2021
Viewed by 603
Abstract
Municipal solid waste management is an environmental issue that has received considerable attention from researchers and environmental managers for decades. Supporting the management programs entail policies and regulations related to municipal solid waste. In developed countries, the implementation of environmental policies plays an [...] Read more.
Municipal solid waste management is an environmental issue that has received considerable attention from researchers and environmental managers for decades. Supporting the management programs entail policies and regulations related to municipal solid waste. In developed countries, the implementation of environmental policies plays an important role and has a substantial impact on the effectiveness of solid waste management. However, in many developing countries such as Vietnam, the situation and effectiveness of the policy implementation have not been studied extensively. This investigation is conducted to ascertain the situation, limitations, and challenges in implementing solid waste management policy in Vietnam. Then, solutions for the problems and improvements for implementation efficiency are presented. This work used online questionnaires to survey environmental managers in different localities and applied qualitative research method to analyze data. The results show that not all national policies on solid waste management are implemented in all localities. Waste separation is also the foremost concern in municipal waste management in most localities of Vietnam. Most of the localities claimed that the unrealistic nature and difficult implementation of the policies and the lack of needed resources are the main limitations and challenges in Vietnam. Survey results also revealed that different localities in Vietnam have different solutions to increase policy implementation efficiency. Besides, the study also found similarities in the implementation of policies in solid waste management between Vietnam and some other countries and also gathered some valuable lessons for the improvement strategy. Finally, the implementation of an effective domestic solid waste management policy is an important platform for improving environmental quality and ensuring the sustainable development of the nation and mankind. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Assessment of Used Baby Diapers Composting in Bolivia
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 5055; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12125055 - 21 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1420
Abstract
Solid waste open dumping in developing countries is a global concern. To move towards sustainable development, mixed waste should be reduced, and recyclable waste recovered. The aim of the current research was to find appropriate solutions to disposable used baby-diapers recycling in Bolivia [...] Read more.
Solid waste open dumping in developing countries is a global concern. To move towards sustainable development, mixed waste should be reduced, and recyclable waste recovered. The aim of the current research was to find appropriate solutions to disposable used baby-diapers recycling in Bolivia since it is a waste fraction widely produced and commonly disposed of in open dumps. Composting of the organic diaper hydrogel was assessed in five trials, adding components available locally: cow dung, activated bacteria, and Californian red earthworms (Eisenia fetida). It was observed that about 60 days were globally required for biomass decomposition with cow dung, activated bacteria, and earthworms, and more than 70 days for the treatment of the substrate mixed only with manure, while the diaper hydrogel did not degrade without cow dung. This research is the first that attempted to treat disposable used baby diapers with the vermicomposting process. In general, the outcomes of the research are promising: vermicomposting with cow manure can be a recycling option for disposable used baby diapers, introducing appropriate practices toward a circular economy in developing regions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Autonomous Motivation for the Successful Implementation of Waste Management Policy: An Examination Using an Adapted Institutional Analysis and Development Framework in Thua Thien Hue, Vietnam
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2724; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12072724 - 30 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Increasing waste production is a serious problem for every country with substantial waste management initiatives. This challenge can be addressed by establishing waste reduction as a strategic policy. To this end, a project prioritizing community-based composting was implemented in Vietnam’s Thua Thien Hue [...] Read more.
Increasing waste production is a serious problem for every country with substantial waste management initiatives. This challenge can be addressed by establishing waste reduction as a strategic policy. To this end, a project prioritizing community-based composting was implemented in Vietnam’s Thua Thien Hue province. The project mandated that the actors involved (i.e., local authorities, assistance groups, and residents) separate out organic waste for composting. To understand more fully how this policy could be implemented more successfully, first, the present study examined the links between local authorities’ support, groups providing assistance to residents during initiatives, and the project’s outcomes. Second, the research focused on the autonomous motivations influencing this project. These two points made our study novel. A case study design was applied based on self-determination theory and an adapted institutional analysis and development framework. Content analyses of qualitative and secondary data were conducted to examine the framework’s relevant components. Focusing on the psychological states approach, results showed that autonomous motivation was the main driver of waste separation and was activated by the local authorities’ autonomy support, deployed via an assistance group consisting of a waste collector and village leader, as well as other community attributes. These factors therefore affected the project’s outcomes. The research demonstrates the need to advocate local authorities’ autonomy support and residents’ autonomous motivation for waste separation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop