Special Issue "Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Agribusiness"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Hokey Min
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Management, College of Business, Maurer Center 312, Bowling Green State University, OH 43403, USA
Interests: global supply chain management; supply chain technology; supply chain benchmarking; supply chain model design
Prof. Dr. Yohannes Haile
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sam and Irene Black School of Business & School of Engineering, The Behrend College, The Pennsylvania State University, Erie, PA 16801, USA
Interests: renewal energy; sustainability; supply chain management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The agriculture industry employs the most people in the world, and the main source of food and income for many people living in poverty. It is not only essential to many countries’ (esp. developing countries) economic growth, but also essential for the sustainability of our living environments, since agricultural products are harvested from the mother earth. Considering a crucial role that agricultural activities play in sustaining our livelihood, their management may have a profound impact on quality of our lives. In particular, since agricultural goods are primary sources of virgin materials needed for environment-friendly products (e.g., corn for ethanol), their thoughtful supply chain management can enhance sustainability. Management of an agricultural supply chain, however, poses many difficult challenges due to the handling of perishable goods, preservation of products susceptible to weather/temperature conditions, distribution of agricultural goods (esp. food) across the world, pricing of commoditized products, government regulations on land property, potential abuse of agricultural workers, and so forth. In recognition of these challenges, this special issue aims to bring together the recent advances in research methodologies and their applications to various aspects of agricultural supply chain activities. The examples of relevant research topics include:

  • Sustainable transportation/storage of perishable agricultural products
  • Responsible disposable of food waste, recycling/reusing of food packages
  • Agricultural commodity pricing or price hedging
  • Corporate social responsibility for agricultural worker treatments
  • Migrant agricultural workforce management
  • Cold-storage location-allocation
  • Omni-channel for food retailing services
  • e-fulfillment of agricultural products
  • Agribusiness infrastructure development
  • Blockchain technology for the security and safety of food products
  • Risk management of the agricultural supply chain

Papers centered on building theory or based on actual case studies will be especially welcomed. In addition, papers that synthesize the past evolution of sustainable agricultural supply chain management and provide future research directions are strongly encouraged. If relevant to the sustainable agricultural supply chain, the topics of interest for this special issue are not limited to the aforementioned areas.

Prof. Dr. Hokey Min
Prof. Dr. Yohannes Haile
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • agribusiness
  • agricultural supply chain
  • cold-supply chain
  • food supply chain
  • corporate social responsibility

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Challenges Threatening Agricultural Sustainability in the West of Iran: Viewpoint of Agricultural Experts
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3537; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063537 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 618
Abstract
Sustainability has always been an emphasized topic in policy making and planning in the agricultural sector of developing countries. Despite this fact, sustainable agriculture has not been realized so far because of the various complex challenges in these countries. The lack of a [...] Read more.
Sustainability has always been an emphasized topic in policy making and planning in the agricultural sector of developing countries. Despite this fact, sustainable agriculture has not been realized so far because of the various complex challenges in these countries. The lack of a structured scientific research on these challenges prompted us to conduct a study to fill this research gap and to create useful knowledge on this issue. In this regard, 300 Iranian agricultural experts, selected through stratified random sampling technique, were interviewed to explore and prioritize challenges threatening agricultural sustainability in the west of Iran. Findings indicated water scarcity and low productivity beside environmental and climate disasters were the most important challenges from the viewpoint of the participants. Moreover, insufficient investment in the agricultural sector and management weakness at the macro and micro levels were other significant challenges from the perspective of experts. Results of exploratory factor analysis indicated that the challenges threatening agricultural sustainability can be divided into nine categories including lack of investment and liquidity; environmental and climate disasters; scientific weakness; weakness of labor force in the agricultural sector; management problems; weakness of information systems; low agricultural productivity and lack of attention to quality; challenges related to agricultural inputs; and global challenges. This 9-factor structure, which confirmed through confirmatory factor analysis, was able to explain 67.52% of the variance related to the challenges threatening agricultural sustainability in the west of Iran. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Agribusiness)
Article
Agrivoltaics Align with Green New Deal Goals While Supporting Investment in the US’ Rural Economy
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 137; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13010137 - 25 Dec 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3033
Abstract
Agrivoltaic systems combine solar photovoltaic energy production with agriculture to improve land-use efficiency. We provide an upper-bound reduced-order cost estimate for widespread implementation of Agrivoltaic systems in the United States. We find that 20% of the US’ total electricity generation can be met [...] Read more.
Agrivoltaic systems combine solar photovoltaic energy production with agriculture to improve land-use efficiency. We provide an upper-bound reduced-order cost estimate for widespread implementation of Agrivoltaic systems in the United States. We find that 20% of the US’ total electricity generation can be met with Agrivoltaic systems if less than 1% of the annual US budget is invested into rural infrastructure. Simultaneously, Agrivoltaic systems align well with existing Green New Deal goals. Widescale installation of Agrivoltaic systems can lead to a carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions reduction equivalent to removing 71,000 cars from the road annually and the creation of over 100,000 jobs in rural communities. Agrivoltaics provide a rare chance for true synergy: more food, more energy, lower water demand, lower carbon emissions, and more prosperous rural communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Supply Chain Management for Sustainable Agribusiness)
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