Special Issue "Sustainable Organic Materials Used in the Construction Sector"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Michael Wistuba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Braunschweig Pavement Engineering Centre, Architecture, Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Technical University of Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
Interests: sustainability of road infrastructures; the fundamental mechanisms that control behavior and durability of asphalt materials and pavement systems; technical testing to address performance properties; composition of asphalt mixtures considering various additives and re-using reclaimed asphalt; design of highway and airport pavements; development of road management concepts
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Di Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Braunschweig Pavement Engineering Centre, Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences Department, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig 38106, Germany.
Interests: asphalt pavement; low temperature properties of bituminous materials; sustainability of road infrastructures; fatigue properties of asphalt mixtures; bio-based materials used in asphalt pavement
Dr. Chiara Riccardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Braunschweig Pavement Engineering Centre, Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences Department, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig 38106, Germany.
Interests: investigation of new solutions for sustainable development of road infrastructures; technology development with incorporation of waste materials into the asphalt mixture (i.e., reclaimed asphalt, biomaterials from biomass, recycled tire rubber, construction and demolition waste); evelopment of modeling of bituminous materials in different materials’ phases (binder, mastic, mortar, FAM, asphalt mixture)
Prof. Dr. Libo Yan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Division of Organic and Wooden Based Materials, Institute of Building Materials, Concrete Construction and Fire Safety, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38102 Braunschweig, Germany
2. Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut WKI, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany
Interests: FRP; fibre reinforced concrete; wood science; bio-composites; hybrid structures; durability of materials; dynamics of structures; recycling and reuse of construction and demolition; agricultural and forestry, and plastic wastes; Thermal and fire performance of materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Zhanping You
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1295, USA
Interests: design, construction, and maintenance of pavements; micromechanics for road materials; discrete and finite element modeling techniques; construction materials: asphalt, aggregate; alternative and recycled materials for civil engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Lily Poulikakos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
Interests: characterization of bituminous materials; rheology; effects of water and moisture; recycling/reuse and multi- scale characterization of asphalt concrete; targeting sustainable and multifunctional road pavements
Dr. Ana Jiménez del Barco Carrión
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Construction Engineering Lab, LabIC.UGR, Construction Engineering Department, University of Granada, 18001 Granada, Spain
Interests: civil engineering; construction materials; transport infrastructures; asphalt pavements; recycling; sustainable materials; renewable materials; biomaterials; life cycle assessment; sustainability assessment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a research paper to this Special Issue dedicated to the field of novel, sustainable solutions in civil engineering. Research-, development-, and application-related submissions sharing most promising techniques and strategies on the topic of civil engineering, material science, and other related domains are all invited.

The construction of buildings and infrastructure is one of most important human production activities. Today, an important share of conventional materials used in civil engineering are produced from non-renewable fossil resources (e.g., cement concrete, binders, fibers, reinforcements, geotextiles, composite materials). Hence, massive amounts of non-renewable resources and energy are consumed globally. To mitigate this, civil engineers are increasingly developing more sustainable construction materials and construction techniques with reduced environmental and safety hazards and reduced carbon footprint, while considering the overall lifecycle, and latest developments in material science. Inter alia, techniques for the recycling and reuse of construction materials at the highest possible recycling rates are steadily improved and implemented, and a new generation of sustainable organic materials has been developed in the last decade (organic plant based materials, bioproducts and biochemicals from biomass, green products, etc.). These initiatives will limit our dependency on non-renewable resources in construction activities in the near future.

This Special Issue entitled “Sustainable Organic Materials used in the Construction Sector” covers various subjects related to the production of organic-based sustainable materials and their application in construction activities. Different sources of sustainable organic materials are screened, as well as their application in different construction sectors (buildings, roads, railways, airports, ports, tunnels, bridges), such as but not limited to cement concrete, asphalt concrete, wood, and hybrid materials. Since the use of such materials in civil construction engineering is an emerging field, literature reviews and state-of-art papers are highly appreciated.

Prof. Dr. Michael P. Wistuba
Dr. Di Wang
Dr. Chiara Riccardi
Prof. Libo Yan
Prof. Zhanping You
Dr. Lily Poulikakos
Dr. Ana Jiménez del Barco Carrión
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development
  • organic materials
  • infrastructure construction
  • building construction
  • organic-plant-based materials
  • biomass-based bioproducts
  • biomass-based biochemicals
  • green products

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Study on the Aging Resistance of Polyurethane Precursor Modified Bitumen and its Mechanism
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9520; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13179520 - 24 Aug 2021
Viewed by 425
Abstract
As an environmentally friendly alternative for the production of high-performance modified asphalt by chemical reactions, a liquid-state polyurethane-precursor-based reactive modifier (PRM) was developed and employed in the asphalt modification. In contrast to the traditional solid bitumen modifier, for example, rubber and thermoplastic elastomers, [...] Read more.
As an environmentally friendly alternative for the production of high-performance modified asphalt by chemical reactions, a liquid-state polyurethane-precursor-based reactive modifier (PRM) was developed and employed in the asphalt modification. In contrast to the traditional solid bitumen modifier, for example, rubber and thermoplastic elastomers, the PRM as a liquid modifier has more significant advantages in reducing energy consumption and improving asphalt performance, which has attracted widespread attention. However, the aging resistance and its mechanism are not clear. In view of this, the aging performance of two PRM-modified bitumen (PRM-70 and PRM-90), under the short-term thermo-oxidative aging, long-term thermo-oxidative aging, and ultraviolet (UV) aging conditions, was investigated through chemical and mechanical methods. The results show that the PRM-90 is more susceptible to the thermos-oxidative aging and UV aging. The use of low-penetration-grade bitumen and ensuring an adequate reaction are beneficial to enhance the aging resistance of PRM-modified bitumen. The impact of aging on high-temperature performance of PRM-modified bitumen is great, followed by the low-temperature performance and the anti-fatigue performance. The mechanic-relevant rheological aging index (RAI) and fracture energy index (FEI) are recommended to evaluate aging properties for PRM-modified bitumen. This study not only provides support for further research on the relationship between the aging properties and mechanical performance of PRM-modified bitumen, but also provides a reference for conducting mechanism analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Organic Materials Used in the Construction Sector)
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Article
Laboratory Investigation of Compaction Characteristics of Plant Recycled Hot-Mix Asphalt Mixture
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3005; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063005 - 10 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 418
Abstract
In this study, the compaction characteristics of recycled hot-mix asphalt (RHMA) were evaluated using the void content (VV), compaction energy index (CEI), slope of accumulated compaction energy (K), and lock point (LP). Then, the effects [...] Read more.
In this study, the compaction characteristics of recycled hot-mix asphalt (RHMA) were evaluated using the void content (VV), compaction energy index (CEI), slope of accumulated compaction energy (K), and lock point (LP). Then, the effects of the compaction parameters, including the gradation of the RHMA, reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) content, temperature of gyrations, and number of gyrations, on the compaction characteristics of RHMA were investigated. An orthogonal experiment was designed and the data collected were analyzed via range analysis; then, a regression model was generated relying on a quadratic polynomial. Furthermore, the regression model was used for the comparison and prediction of the mixture’s compactability during the material design. Finally, the compaction mechanism of RHMA was discussed from the perspective of the void content of RAP particles. The results showed that a finer aggregate gradation, a higher gyration temperature, a greater number of gyrations, and a higher RAP content were effective for increasing the compactability of RHMA. The range analysis results suggest that the gradation of RHMA has the greatest influence on compactability, followed by the RAP content. The RAP aggregate cannot diffuse to a new mixture completely, so the remained RAP particle reduces the void content of RHMA. Therefore, a higher RAP content up to 50% can help RHMA to achieve the designed void content with higher efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Organic Materials Used in the Construction Sector)
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