Special Issue "Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Konstadinos Mattas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: agricultural policy; food policy; sustainability; rural development
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Stefanos A. Nastis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: agricultural economics; health and environmental economics; sustainable development
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. George Baourakis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Chania, Chania, Greece
Interests: food marketing; supply food chain analysis; management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue comprises a selection of papers from the 164th EAAE Seminar on Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains that will be held in September 2018. Unambiguously, preserving the ecosystem and securing sustainability are very complex topics with interlinked dimensions. Agro-food chains, in the present economic system, have a core role since the mode in which they function influences both producers and consumers. The seminar covers the aforementioned topic following a broad approach, while also focusing on sustainable food chains, and how they can influence agro-food production and consumption as a whole. The seminar aims to bring together researchers and policy makers from the relevant fields and establish the relation between agro-food chains and the preservation and provision of ecosystem services. In addition, environmental, economic and societal issues will be tackled from a transaction perspective. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subjected to a rigorous peer review process with the aim of wide dissemination of valuable research results.

Prof. Konstadinos Mattas
Dr. Stefanos Nastis
Dr. George Baourakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Agro-food chains
  • Ecosystem services
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Societal equity
  • Climate change
  • Transaction analysis

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Paradox of the Virtual Water Trade Balance in the Mediterranean Region
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2978; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13052978 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 739
Abstract
Climate change, water shortages and desertification threaten the economic and environmental sustainability in the Mediterranean. Limited rainfall and higher temperatures put agricultural production, which relies on water availability, in jeopardy. Thereupon, Mediterranean countries pursue agri-food resilience and water preservation through efficient water policies. [...] Read more.
Climate change, water shortages and desertification threaten the economic and environmental sustainability in the Mediterranean. Limited rainfall and higher temperatures put agricultural production, which relies on water availability, in jeopardy. Thereupon, Mediterranean countries pursue agri-food resilience and water preservation through efficient water policies. Hence, water-deprived areas ought to import rather than produce water-intensive products to maintain water inventories and sustainability consequently. As this study examines the water sustainability for a Mediterranean water-scarce region with a particular focus on agriculture, the virtual water trade balance explores this hypothesis. A regional input–output model is constructed, and then total water consumption and the virtual water flows for each economic sector are estimated to determine the virtual water trade balance of the economy. Results indicate that the study area has a trade deficit and struggles economically but is a net importer of virtual water and secures water sustainability. As this virtual water deficit relies heavily on agriculture and originates in vast total water consumption rather than a large trade deficit, a paradox occurs; water-intensive cultivations and animals that consume 91.75% of water resources end up appearing to be water-saving. Further research is needed to strike a balance between economic growth and environmental protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
Article
Understanding Farmers’ Behavior towards Sustainable Practices and Their Perceptions of Risk
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1303; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11051303 - 01 Mar 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1110
Abstract
Farmers, as the first link in the agri-food value chain, are key in assuring its sustainability. Farmers’ behavior and attitudes towards implementing sustainable farm practices is influenced by their perceptions of risk affecting the farm and their household, either directly or indirectly. In [...] Read more.
Farmers, as the first link in the agri-food value chain, are key in assuring its sustainability. Farmers’ behavior and attitudes towards implementing sustainable farm practices is influenced by their perceptions of risk affecting the farm and their household, either directly or indirectly. In this study, we elicit farmers’ perceived risk perception and preferences and test their robustness and validity using a sample of Greek smallholder farmers since they represent the majority of Greek holdings. Results suggest that farmers exhibit risk aversion in most situations of farm-level decision making. In many situations, farmers will prefer on-farm environmental sustainability strategies over other risk mitigation strategies. More specifically, higher age, higher education, farm size, proportion of rented land, and the existence of a farm succession plan reveal an increase in farmers’ preference for on-farm environmentally sustainable strategies and suggest reduced incentives towards implementing other on-farm or off-farm solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
Article
Applicability of Transaction Cost Economics to Understanding Organizational Structures in Solidarity-Based Food Systems in Germany
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 1095; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11041095 - 19 Feb 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1792
Abstract
In response to consumer concerns about sustainability of food production and distribution systems, and the difficulties many agricultural producers face to self-sustain while providing the quality of products consumers desire, alternatives to market-based exchange are developing. Solidarity-based food systems (SFS) based on relationships [...] Read more.
In response to consumer concerns about sustainability of food production and distribution systems, and the difficulties many agricultural producers face to self-sustain while providing the quality of products consumers desire, alternatives to market-based exchange are developing. Solidarity-based food systems (SFS) based on relationships of mutual trust, dependency and support between consumers and producers are an example. SFS are designed to insulate producers from market pressures and alleviate consumers’ mistrust in market-based mechanisms. A network of SFS has formed in Germany under the name Solidarische Landwirtschaft (Solawi). Theories based on economic principles that help explain the way alternatives to market-based transactions in agriculture are organized are still lacking. The article suggests Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) as helpful to gain a better understanding of how these organizations form and function. The governance structures Solawis create are considered hybrid organizations according to TCE. Qualitative research methods are used to generate detailed accounts of the governance structures of four Solawis and the reasons behind the decisions of individual actors to participate. Effectiveness of TCE in evaluating these structures is analyzed. Based on the results, the concept of transaction benefits is suggested as a potential augmentation of TCE to improve its applicability to SFS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Article
Segmenting the Generation Z Cohort University Students Based on Sustainable Food Consumption Behavior: A Preliminary Study
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 837; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11030837 - 06 Feb 2019
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 4618
Abstract
In-depth knowledge of sustainable food consumption behavior regarding university students, and especially the younger ones, reveals tendencies of the worlds’ sustainable future. This study aims to explore the sustainable food consumption behavior of the Generation Z cohort (18–23 years of age) that is [...] Read more.
In-depth knowledge of sustainable food consumption behavior regarding university students, and especially the younger ones, reveals tendencies of the worlds’ sustainable future. This study aims to explore the sustainable food consumption behavior of the Generation Z cohort (18–23 years of age) that is studying at Greek universities and living away from home, and to segment them according to their behavior. Quantitative research was implemented with an online questionnaire, which resulted in a collection of 252 valid samples. The results revealed that the focus of sustainable food consumption behavior is limited to eating seasonal fruits and vegetables and purchasing regional food. Additionally, it identified two student segments based on sustainable food consumption behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
Article
Market-Oriented Sustainability of Sjenica Sheep Cheese
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 834; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11030834 - 06 Feb 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1463
Abstract
This study investigated the nature and level of market-oriented sustainability of Sjenica sheep cheese, a Serbian Protected Designation of Origin (PDO)-registered product. In the analysis of the supply chain market sustainability, three theories were used: Resource dependence theory, upper echelons theory, and signaling [...] Read more.
This study investigated the nature and level of market-oriented sustainability of Sjenica sheep cheese, a Serbian Protected Designation of Origin (PDO)-registered product. In the analysis of the supply chain market sustainability, three theories were used: Resource dependence theory, upper echelons theory, and signaling theory. The data were collected using a stepwise research design, applying techniques of observation and in-depth and telephone interviewing. The results show that the low recognition of the PDO label among Serbian consumers and all participants in the supply chain and the lack of the presence in the markets and large packages negatively impact domestic consumers in their decisions to purchase higher amounts of Sjenica sheep cheese. Small producers lack bargaining power, whereas their perceptions hinder formation of inter-organizational arrangements. The insufficient education of big producers and distributors impede the achievement of better business results. The main challenges for the export of Sjenica sheep cheese are the inadequate certification of this food product for the European Union market, the lack of standardized production process that results in variations in the product quality, and the unawareness of the regional consumers of Sjenica sheep cheese due to insufficient communication efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Article
Producers’ and Consumers’ Perception of the Sustainability of Short Food Supply Chains: The Case of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 721; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11030721 - 30 Jan 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2116
Abstract
Recent literature has highlighted the importance of testing the sustainability performances of supply chains. Nevertheless, this field of research is still in its early stages, in particular with reference to short food supply chains (SFSCs). This research analyzed producers’ and consumers’ perception of [...] Read more.
Recent literature has highlighted the importance of testing the sustainability performances of supply chains. Nevertheless, this field of research is still in its early stages, in particular with reference to short food supply chains (SFSCs). This research analyzed producers’ and consumers’ perception of the economic, social and environmental sustainability of two SFSCs of a specific quality of cheese (Parmigiano Reggiano PDO) placed in two different contexts: the first is a rural area in the Appennino Tosco-Emiliano National Park mountains and the second is a peri-urban area in Parma surroundings, both in Italy. The case study also analyzed the carbon emissions of shopping for Parmigiano Reggiano at dairy shops. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were employed to achieve the aims of the present study. For producers in both areas, the SFSC is a successful strategy to sell a part of their output in their own outlets, gain reputation, reduce costs and at the same time increase their levels of self-esteem. Product quality is the biggest factor attracting consumers to the outlet; moreover, it is associated with trust in the producers and the idea of combining “leisure with pleasure”. However, the environmental impact of the consumers’ purchase activities is a drawback. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Article
Assessing the Potentials of Bioeconomy Sectors in Poland Employing Input-Output Modeling
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 594; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11030594 - 23 Jan 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1594
Abstract
Bioeconomy emerges under major current global challenges, both environmental and economic, that are related to the existence and use of bio-based resources; in this context, policy stakeholders and scientists seek and propose potential solutions. Bioeconomy is among the discussed strategies with the potential [...] Read more.
Bioeconomy emerges under major current global challenges, both environmental and economic, that are related to the existence and use of bio-based resources; in this context, policy stakeholders and scientists seek and propose potential solutions. Bioeconomy is among the discussed strategies with the potential to offer solutions. In this framework, bioeconomy’s importance increased over the last several years, thus it is essential to identify and monitor its role and significance in an economy and assess its potentials and intersectoral relationships. In this framework, the current study, through a general equilibrium analysis, aims to identify the sectors that are related to the bioeconomy and assess their potential in the Polish economy as such quantitative studies do not exist in the literature for Poland. For doing so, an Input-Output model was built, identifying initially the bioeconomy sectors and, afterwards, estimating their linkage coefficients in order to capture their direct and indirect impacts on the Polish economy. Results indicate that the fully bio-based sectors, such as the agriculture and food sectors, have higher potentials to induce knock-on effects in the economy than the mixed bio-based sectors. Thus, the current study’s results can offer important information to policy makers for decision making, such as in the case of planning development in any mixed bio-based sectors, such as biofuels or biogas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
Article
Innovations in Sustainable Agriculture: Case Study of Lis Valley Irrigation District, Portugal
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 331; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11020331 - 10 Jan 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2657
Abstract
The innovation of agricultural systems management is a determinant factor that guarantees adaptation to a new paradigm of global economy, environmental protection, and social requirements. The conventional concepts of innovation, applicable to new products and processes, do not consider many characteristics of the [...] Read more.
The innovation of agricultural systems management is a determinant factor that guarantees adaptation to a new paradigm of global economy, environmental protection, and social requirements. The conventional concepts of innovation, applicable to new products and processes, do not consider many characteristics of the agricultural sector, such as social innovation and innovation resulting from new or renewed processes. Nevertheless, the overall impact of innovation on yields, competitiveness, and value can be hampered by the limited understanding or misinterpretation of Agriculture Innovation paradigms. For instance, the Rural Development Program (RDP) applies a restrict concept of innovation, being unable to embrace the full range of activities intended to implement new practices within the framework of the Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation System (AKIS). Stimulating innovation in agriculture demands a change in policy innovation of RDP in order to preserve natural resources and combine agricultural priorities and the rural environment with the concepts of innovation. This paper focuses on the different views of the concept of innovation within the Program of Operational Groups (OGs) of the European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI), analyzing the Portuguese case study of the Lis Valley Irrigation District whose main innovation objective was to achieve and implement new processes of water management aiming at the conservation of natural resources as well as sustainable social and economic agricultural development. The Portuguese experience highlights why the application of innovation in agriculture may not reach the desirable outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Article
Are Geographical Indication Products Fostering Public Goods? Some Evidence from Europe
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 272; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11010272 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2194
Abstract
Within the framework of multifunctional conceptualisation, the authors have investigated the level of public goods embedded in Agri-food geographical indication products. Moving from the concept of the local Agri-food system, the generation of public goods are observed both on the value chain and [...] Read more.
Within the framework of multifunctional conceptualisation, the authors have investigated the level of public goods embedded in Agri-food geographical indication products. Moving from the concept of the local Agri-food system, the generation of public goods are observed both on the value chain and on the territory. Three different dimensions of public goods are considered: Cultural heritage issues, socio-economic themes, and natural resources. To pursue this aim, the FAO-SAFA method is adopted. A single index for the three dimensions is computed in order to provide an easy and quick interpretation of the three dimensions. Preliminary empirical evidence on two cases studies suggests different public goods levels embedded in geographical indications, depending on the dimensions analysed. The method proposed aims to be a simple and effective tool to support good practice for policy makers and indicate fields for intervention where indexes show that improvements could be made. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Article
Eco-System Services in Agrarian Value Chains: Value Detection of Bio-Diversity as Public Good Provision, Problems, and Institutional Issues
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 26; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11010026 - 20 Dec 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1781
Abstract
Valuation of nature (biodiversity: BD) and in particular ecosystem services (ESS) are important prerequisites for the design of cultural landscapes as well as in agricultural policy and the generation of BD as public interest. Designs should be built on valuation and valuation is [...] Read more.
Valuation of nature (biodiversity: BD) and in particular ecosystem services (ESS) are important prerequisites for the design of cultural landscapes as well as in agricultural policy and the generation of BD as public interest. Designs should be built on valuation and valuation is usually seen as market assignment of prices. Yet, there is a problem with market failure. BD and ESS can be characterized as public goods, both being non-rival and non-exclusive, thus demanding public provision. Largely due to public pressure, nature provision and planning has received increased attention. Especially as a means to create values i.e. in conservation projects and specifically to add value and income to farmers’ value chains. Governments seek to promote BD and landscape provision by farmers, but money is scarce. Planners frequently do not know what the public wants and contingent valuation results are often regarded as insufficient because of missing vehicles of payment. There is scope for a more workable coordination process (institutional innovation) between interests in nature provision projects (being oriented at BD and corresponding ESS) and willingness to pay WTP (for foods related to nature). It is the objective to show that value chains of food products which are strongly related to nature and landscapes are a venue to go under multi-functionality for BD. The issue addressed is to offer a BD which creates WTP in value chains and serves as source of finance for BD provision. Hereby, the public is represented by an ecological management. We will primarily provide an analytical framework which merges public good provision theory with farm behavior modelling as well as draws on modeling of bargaining as solutions from social power theory. Provision is set by valuing through BD management and foods contain ESS by which the value chain improves at private good markets. Food is marketed through a special value chain and consumers help to finance public management of ESS. We distinguish the process of public preference formation from those of individual formation and can reckon a concept of social power. 1. An introduction to preference detection highlights the need for a public approach. 2. Interest group preferences are modeled. 3. A manager will be entitled to charge fees to beneficiaries and guarantee compensations. 4. Bargaining for BD indicating ESS is outlined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Article
Digital Technologies Towards Resource Efficiency in the Agrifood Sector: Key Challenges in Developing Countries
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4850; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su10124850 - 19 Dec 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1740
Abstract
Resource efficiency in the agri-food sector is a global urgent issue considering the urbanisation phenomena, the increased nutritional needs, and the emergence of diversified dietary norms. Despite the ongoing progress in digital technologies that could enable resource-efficient operations in the sector, their effectiveness—even [...] Read more.
Resource efficiency in the agri-food sector is a global urgent issue considering the urbanisation phenomena, the increased nutritional needs, and the emergence of diversified dietary norms. Despite the ongoing progress in digital technologies that could enable resource-efficient operations in the sector, their effectiveness—even in developed countries—remains debateable mainly due to the limited understanding that further impedes their adoption by farmers. Among others, ease of access, training, and engagement with digital technologies appears to be challenging for most stakeholders, especially during the production (farming) stage. Specifically, in developing countries, that often encounter major natural resources challenges, the diverse socio-cultural background of the farmers hinders the adoption of digital technologies to perform highly automated and efficient agricultural operations for ensuring sustainability output. In this regard, we explore publicly available data sources (i.e., institutional reports, databases) to identify key challenges in adopting digital technologies for efficient resource use from a systems-level perspective. Thereafter, we map the determinant factors using the System Dynamics methodology in order to identify areas of interventions to limit natural resources’ appropriation and support agri-food sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Review

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Review
Energy Analysis, and Carbon and Water Footprint for Environmentally Friendly Farming Practices in Agroecosystems and Agroforestry
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1664; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11061664 - 19 Mar 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1646
Abstract
Agriculture accounts for 5% of the entire energy used worldwide. Most of it is not in a renewable form, so it can be linked to greenhouse gas emissions. According to the Paris Agreement, on climate change, one of its major targets is the [...] Read more.
Agriculture accounts for 5% of the entire energy used worldwide. Most of it is not in a renewable form, so it can be linked to greenhouse gas emissions. According to the Paris Agreement, on climate change, one of its major targets is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the agricultural production process must drastically change. Currently, the sustainable use of water is critical for any agricultural development. Agricultural production effects water quality and sufficiency, as well as, freshwater wetlands. Energy balance, carbon, and water footprint are crucial for sustainable agricultural production. Agroforestry systems are important in reducing high inputs of non-renewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions, along with better water use, leading to the most minimal influence on climate change. Energy analysis, carbon, and water footprint can be applied to agroforestry systems’ production. An outline could be applied by adopting a modified—for agricultural production—life cycle assessment methodology to assess energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and water consumption in agroforestry ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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Other

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Concept Paper
A Community-Based Agro-Food Hub Model for Sustainable Farming
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 1017; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11041017 - 15 Feb 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2416
Abstract
This conceptual paper focuses on the Agro-Food Hub paradigm as the main enabler for the sustainable development of agro-food Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the context of the currently established agro-food systems. This paper is based on a shared knowledge-driven research that [...] Read more.
This conceptual paper focuses on the Agro-Food Hub paradigm as the main enabler for the sustainable development of agro-food Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the context of the currently established agro-food systems. This paper is based on a shared knowledge-driven research that presents different approaches/types of Agro-Food Hubs, providing useful insights into the strategic, operational and institutional approaches of the topic. After the illustration of the main approaches for the Agro-Food Hubs met in the literature, a holistic Agro-Food Hubs model was proposed (the Agro-Food Sustainability Knowledge Hub model), incorporating the main principles and functional guidelines within the framework of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Sustainable Supply Chain Management. This study is in line with the demographic, economic and social prospects for the 2050 and the European Economic and Social Committee decision for “An EU Industrial Policy for the Food and Drinks Sector” adopted on 4 May 2015. In particular, since the majority of research in the past focused on large organizations, this paper is expected to enlighten the problems emerged from current applied practices together with the opportunities for potential synergies among agricultural SMEs, through the utilization of alternative sustainable channels of distribution and value creation, such as the Agro-Food Hubs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preserving Ecosystem Services via Sustainable Agro-Food Chains)
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