Special Issue "Innovative Agricultural Systems to Address Climate Change and Enhance Sustainable Agriculture"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Air, Climate Change and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mokhele Moeletsi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agricultural Research Council, PO Box 8783 Pretoria, South Africa
Interests: agrometeorology; carbon management; climate change adaptation; sustainable agriculture
Dr. Walter Mupangwa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), P.O. Box 5689 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Interests: agrometeorology; climate-smart agriculture; farming systems; soil science
Dr. Mehreteab Tesfai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil resources and Land Use, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), 1433 Ås, Norway
Interests: climate-smart agriculture; sustainable intensification; food security; soil and water management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, the agriculture sector is facing a number of challenges, climate change being one of the most detrimental factors that deters the global initiatives for sustainable development. There is a dire need for the agricultural sector to undergo a significant transformation in order to enhance food security and sustainable agriculture. Climate variability, in terms of extreme weather events (drought and flooding), is threatening food and nutrition security, socio-economic development and sustainability of natural resources and ecosystems

Redesigning the existing agricultural production systems is crucial to (1) increase agricultural productivity; (2) protect the environment; (3) build up resilience and mitigate climate change effects; (4) strengthen livelihoods.

Adapting to climate change requires consolidated efforts of all stakeholders to ensure resilience of agricultural systems. Even though farmers are at the heart of the system, other key players, such as government departments, research institutions, academic institutions, private sector and non-governmental organizations, can each contribute towards building resilient agricultural production systems.

It is vital for the agricultural sector to also reduce greenhouse gas emissions so as to ensure that the efforts by many countries around the world to reach carbon neutral economy in the near future are successful.

This Special Issue invites scientific articles, review papers, concept notes, protocols and communications that address the sustainability of agricultural production. Manuscripts covering (but not limited to) the following key areas are welcomed:

  • Improved agricultural systems for sustainable agriculture;
  • Climate-smart agricultural practices;
  • Agriculture and climate change mitigation;
  • Early warning systems for agriculture;
  • Agricultural adaptation strategies to climate change;
  • Policy briefs and strategies for sustainable agriculture;
  • Integrated crop–livestock production system.

Dr. Mokhele Moeletsi
Dr. Walter Mupangwa
Dr. Mehreteab Tesfai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adaptation strategies
  • climate change mitigation
  • climate variability and agriculture
  • sustainable agriculture

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Communication
Improving the Food and Nutritional Security of Smallholder Farmers in South Africa: Evidence from the InnovAfrica Project
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9902; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13179902 - 03 Sep 2021
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Abstract
This article highlights evidence and lessons learned from the InnovAfrica project conducted by the Agricultural Research Council in collaboration with other international organizations between 2017 and 2021. This project aimed to test and upscale best-bet Sustainable Agricultural Intensification (SAI) practices through Multi-Actor Platforms [...] Read more.
This article highlights evidence and lessons learned from the InnovAfrica project conducted by the Agricultural Research Council in collaboration with other international organizations between 2017 and 2021. This project aimed to test and upscale best-bet Sustainable Agricultural Intensification (SAI) practices through Multi-Actor Platforms (MAPs) and improved dissemination strategies across six African countries (viz. Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Tanzania). The goal of the project was to improve the food and nutritional security of smallholder farmers in Africa. The article briefly discusses some of the key challenges that smallholder agriculture is facing, results from the agricultural interventions brought in by the InnovAfrica project, evidence-based actions and policy recommendations to improve the sustainable agricultural productivity of smallholder farmers in the South African case study. The study showed that SAI practices increased crop yields and build climate-resilient farming communities. It is recommended that the promotion of SAI practices should be supported by enabling institutions and conducive policies that will enhance access to inputs, market linkages, improved access to credit and good agricultural lands, the establishment of functional farmer groups and participatory learning models. These recommendations can be used by the government and other agencies to develop effective interventions to improve food and nutrition security. Full article
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Article
Feminization of African Agriculture and the Meaning of Decision-Making for Empowerment and Sustainability
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8993; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13168993 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 668
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess women’s decision-making power in small-scale agriculture in six African countries in view of the feminization of agriculture and to discuss the meaning of decision-making in relation to women’s empowerment and sustainability. The data are drawn [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to assess women’s decision-making power in small-scale agriculture in six African countries in view of the feminization of agriculture and to discuss the meaning of decision-making in relation to women’s empowerment and sustainability. The data are drawn from a multisite and mixed-method agricultural research and development project in six sub-Saharan countries including two sites in each country. The five domains of empowerment outlined in the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index are used to structure the analysis. The results indicate that in the selected sites in Malawi, Rwanda and South Africa, women farmers tend to dominate agricultural decision-making, while the result is more mixed in the Kenyan sites, and decision-making tends to be dominated by men in the sites in Tanzania and Ethiopia. Despite women participating in agricultural decision-making, the qualitative results show that women small-scale farmers were not perceived to be empowered in any of the country sites. It appears that the feminization of agriculture leads to women playing a more important role in decision-making but also to more responsibilities and heavier workloads without necessarily resulting in improvements in well-being outcomes that would enhance sustainability. Full article
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