Special Issue "Energy Economics and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kentaka Aruga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Japan
Interests: agricultural and seafood markets; oil market; natural gas market; coal market; energy transition; energy security; environmental Kuznets curve; time series analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global use of energy is likely to continue increasing, and this pressure on the climate change is wreaking havoc on the natural environment. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the energy sector, it is crucial to have an energy policy that helps reduce anthropogenic emissions related to energy use. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), as of 2016, there are still 1.1. billion people (14% of global population) on our planet without access to electricity and it is becoming more strenuous to mitigate GHG emissions due to growing global energy use.

Hence, it is crucial for every country to promote energy efficient technologies and promote cleaner energy sources. Economics is a powerful and robust tool for analysing how policies can change human and institutional behavior to adopt such efficient technologies and cleaner energy sources to achieve sustainable energy use. In this Special Issue, the energy use is sustainable when access to energy is secured for all people while the way the energy is supplied mitigates the effects of energy use on the environment. This Special Issue is hoping to gather various studies using economics to analyze conditions to achieve such sustainable energy use and investigating an effective energy policy to achieve this goal. Papers focusing on this issue at local/national, regional or global levels are all welcomed.

The Special Issue also welcomes submissions on diverse topics relevant to below using economic and econometric methods, but not limited to these areas:

  • Transition from fossil fuel energy to renewable energy.
  • Fossil fuel energy and GHG
  • Sustainability and unconventional oil and gas supply.
  • Innovations in energy efficiency: smart technologies, electric vehicles, high-efficiency coal and natural gas fired power plants, and so on.
  • Decarbonization and energy security.
  • Nuclear power and energy security.
  • Sustainable energy policy in the developing countries.

Dr. Kentaka Aruga
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable energy use
  • energy transition
  • fossil fuels and emissions
  • unconventional oil and gas
  • energy efficiency
  • renewable energy and policy
  • smart meter
  • transportation and emissions
  • electric vehicle
  • decarbonization
  • energy security

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of COVID-19 on Indian Energy Consumption
Sustainability 2020, 12(14), 5616; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12145616 - 13 Jul 2020
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 3900
Abstract
Just after the Indian government issued the first lockdown rule to cope with the increasing number of COVID-19 cases in March 2020, the energy consumption in India plummeted dramatically. However, as the lockdown relaxed, energy consumption started to recover. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Just after the Indian government issued the first lockdown rule to cope with the increasing number of COVID-19 cases in March 2020, the energy consumption in India plummeted dramatically. However, as the lockdown relaxed, energy consumption started to recover. In this study, we investigated how COVID-19 cases affected Indian energy consumption during the COVID-19 crisis by testing if the lockdown release had a positive impact on energy consumption and if richer regions were quicker to recover their energy consumption to the level before the lockdown. Using the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model, the study reveals that a long-run relationship holds between the COVID-19 cases and energy consumption and that the COVID-19 cases have a positive effect on Indian energy consumption. This result indicates that as lockdown relaxed, energy consumption started to recover. However, such a positive impact was not apparent in the Eastern and North-Eastern regions, which are the poorest regions among the five regions investigated in the study. This implies that poorer regions need special aid and policy to recover their economy from the damage suffered from the COVID-19 crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Economics and Sustainability)
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Article
Energy Security Analysis for a 100% Renewable Energy Transition in Jordan by 2050
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4921; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12124921 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1939
Abstract
Energy security analysis is a strong tool for policy makers. It allows them to formulate policies that would enhance energy systems by targeting necessary actions. In this study, the impacts of transitioning from a fossil fuels to a renewables dominated energy system on [...] Read more.
Energy security analysis is a strong tool for policy makers. It allows them to formulate policies that would enhance energy systems by targeting necessary actions. In this study, the impacts of transitioning from a fossil fuels to a renewables dominated energy system on energy security is analysed for Jordan. A Best Policy Scenario was developed for the Jordanian energy system to trace the transition to a 100% renewable energy system. Energy security was analysed for the future system by a qualitative approach utilising colour codes. The results reveal that the primary energy demand increases from 64 TWh in 2015 to 130 TWh in 2050, dominated by electricity and followed by heat and bioenergy. This indicates that a high level of direct and indirect electrification is the key to transition towards a fully sustainable energy system. Renewable electricity generation is projected to increase from 0.1 TWh in 2015 to 110.7 TWh in 2050, with a solar photovoltaic share of 92%. The levelised cost of energy develops from 78 €/MWh in 2015 to 61 €/MWh in 2050. In 2050, this system will have zero greenhouse gas emissions, it will provide plenty of job opportunities and revenue generation. This proposed transition will enhance the energy security level of the Jordanian energy system in five of the six dimensions studied. The five dimensions that will be improved are availability, cost, environment, health, and employment, whereas the dimension on diversity will stay neutral. It can be concluded that Jordan can achieve a 100% renewable energy system by 2050 and such a transition will enhance the energy security level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Economics and Sustainability)
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Article
Energy Security of Poland and Coal Supply: Price Analysis
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2541; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12062541 - 24 Mar 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1084
Abstract
Energy security is one of the most intensely debated topics. Majority of papers treat the issue from the hydrocarbon market perspective, but this research focuses on the coal market broken into two specific market segments: heating and electricity production. Using the case of [...] Read more.
Energy security is one of the most intensely debated topics. Majority of papers treat the issue from the hydrocarbon market perspective, but this research focuses on the coal market broken into two specific market segments: heating and electricity production. Using the case of Poland as an example, we conduct a cointegration analysis between the coal and natural gas markets. The study uses monthly data from 2011 until the beginning of 2019. Our results show that the Polish electricity sector is more connected to the international coal market than it is to the natural gas market, while the heating sector, despite using insignificant quantities of imported coal, is more connected to the natural gas market. Hence, energy security—in its price dimension—in those two market segments differs. This situation has important policy implications. First, energy policy should take this difference into account, and second, such variation implies that different market tools should be used in those market segments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Economics and Sustainability)
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