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Special Issue "International Sustainable Development Law"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Geography and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sumudu Atapattu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Law School, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
Interests: environmental rights; international sustainable development law; climate change and human rights

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Sustainable development” has become one of the most influential principles in international law. Literature on it has virtually exploded over the past three decades. From states to multinational corporations and from affluent communities in the Global North to impoverished communities in the Global South, virtually everybody is now talking about sustainable development. It has come a long way since the World Commission on Environment and Development first popularized the term in 1987, and it has both ardent proponents and critiques On the one end of the spectrum are those who believe that it is a hard concept to define and operationalize, and virtually any kind of development can be considered “sustainable” as long as it is labeled “sustainable”. On the other end of the spectrum are those who believe that a new branch of international law called “international sustainable development law” has emerged. It has also received the attention of the World Court and other tribunals and a substantial body of jurisprudence on sustainable development has emerged (excerpts from Sumudu Atapattu, “From ‘Our Common Future’ to Sustainable Development Goals: Evolution of Sustainable Development under International Law,” Wisconsin International Law Journal, vol 36:2 (2019), 215).

As academics, we should take a step back and take stock of this burgeoning field. What does “international sustainable development law” mean? What are the principles that come within the umbrella of sustainable development? What are the pros and cons of sustainable development? How have judiciaries around the world applied it? How have development agencies and international organizations applied it? Are there significant national laws that seek to operationalize it? How do we reform our national laws and institutions to embrace sustainability and sustainable development?

The guest editor for this Special Issue is Dr Sumudu Atapattu of University of Wisconsin Law School. The Special Issue, which will be published online, invites articles from scholars and advanced PhD students in any discipline, especially, law, political science, sociology, economics, and international studies to submit an abstract within the broad theme “International Sustainable Development Law.” Possible topics include (but not limited to):

  • Sustainable development in the era of climate change
  • Sustainable development and the Anthropocene
  • Sustainable development and human rights
  • Sustainable development and the North-South divide
  • Sustainable development, Sustainable Development Goals, and human rights
  • Sustainable development and courts
  • Sustainable development and environmental constitutionalism
  • Sustainable development, human rights and good governance
  • Right to development or sustainable development
  • Sustainable development and capitalism
  • Sustainable development, business enterprises and multinational corporations
  • Sustainability versus environmental protection

To apply, please submit an abstract of around 1000-1200 words and a CV electronically to Sumudu Atapattu (sumud[email protected]) no later than (15 February 2020). Successful submissions will be notified by (30 March 2020). Completed papers of 8,000-10,000 words will be due on 30 September 2020.

Questions can be referred to the Guest Editor, Dr. Sumudu Atapattu at [email protected] or the Editorial Office at <[email protected]>.

Dr. Sumudu Atapattu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development
  • climate change
  • Anthropocene
  • human rights
  • North-South divide
  • Sustainable Development Goals

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
From a Three-Legged Stool to a Three-Dimensional World: Integrating Rights, Gender and Indigenous Knowledge into Sustainability Practice and Law
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9521; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229521 - 16 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1539
Abstract
“Sustainable Development” has come a long way since the World Commission on Environment and Development first popularized the term in 1987. Virtually everyone is now familiar with the term Sustainable Development, from states to multinational corporations, and from affluent communities in the Global [...] Read more.
“Sustainable Development” has come a long way since the World Commission on Environment and Development first popularized the term in 1987. Virtually everyone is now familiar with the term Sustainable Development, from states to multinational corporations, and from affluent communities in the Global North to impoverished communities in the Global South. It received a new lease of life in 2015 when the United Nations General Assembly adopted Agenda 2030 and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is recognized that sustainable development requires an inter-disciplinary, multi-level, and bottom-up approach, and that this ideal is easy to state but difficult to operationalize. Pursuant to deliberations at an international workshop at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, which aimed at fostering the exchange of ideas among diverse experts and developing solutions for effective inclusion of women and youth in climate change response strategies, we propose an innovative, practical three-dimensional model that enhances sustainability theory and practice with cross-cutting integration of human rights, gender equity, and Indigenous and local knowledge. We evaluate the utility of the model in two ways: First, we analyze how the model informs current approaches to environmental sustainability and human wellbeing including the SDGs, agroecology, de-growth principles, and planetary health metrics. Then, we explore the feasibility and added value of the approach through seven case studies from Guatemala, Sri Lanka, Malawi, Peru, Côte D’Ivoire, and Aotearoa—New Zealand. We conclude that the proposed model is congruent with current theory and practice. It builds on existing principles by identifying and addressing gaps. It enables practical action in a variety of settings and fosters a more integrated approach to sustainable wellbeing for humanity and our earth. We recommend continued development of this theoretical framework and related guidelines for program design, implementation and evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue International Sustainable Development Law)
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