Special Issue "Landscape Futures for an Urbanized Society—Challenges, Opportunities, and Requirements for the New Anthropogenic Age"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Richard Coles
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Birmingham School of Architecture and Design, Faculty of Arts, Design and Media, Birmingham City University, Birmingham B4 7BD, UK
Interests: user-based approaches and qualitative methods in investigating environmental and green space interaction, the role of physical engagement and activity in fostering well-being and a sense of worth; the importance of the narrative and the use of language within a user-based approach, narratives as a performative act to stimulate and engender memory and positive states of well-being, memory loops and positive feedback; the co-design of community and associated research agendas, how individuals and communities interact with the urban and natural environment, how to design and manage environments that support individuals and contribute to their unique identities underpinning the achievement of high levels of wellbeing; applying specialist expertise to deliver processes of knowledge exchange by applying methodologies which give power and voice to the individual and their communities, community and urban forestry, urban agriculture, socio-ecology, associated aspects of sustainability
Dr. Sandra Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Birmingham School of Architecture and Design, Faculty of Arts, Design and Media, Birmingham City University, Birmingham B4 7BD, UK
Interests: exploring current issues and challenges faced by landscapes and the built environment, to create resilient environments, healthy urban landscapes and long-term visions for areas identified for future housing and employment, together with strategies relating to important matters such as climate change, food urbanism and public health and wellbeing; user-based perceptions, experiences and interactions with the environment; exploring the choreographies of landscape experience through which individuals negotiate wellbeing; in-depth nature of person–place interactions and the role of places in the production of loops of “positive states of being”, “enhanced spatial awareness” and specific identities of self
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As we more fully understand how urban centres function, so we more clearly recognise the paradigm surrounding landscape futures, human wellbeing, the needs of society and factors that engender or foster positive lifestyles. However, recent COVID-19 lockdown measures implemented over much of the developed world have brought into question how access to landscape experiences should or might be offered, while current approaches might also be questioned in the face of direct citizen actions, newly emerged thinking, urban land use priorities, co-creation approaches and professional responsibilities.

This raises questions regarding circumstances surrounding the development of the urban landscape as an essential and fully integrated resource that supports human endeavour and human needs, but are such aspects of landscape interaction properly recognised or given the right priority in current urban strategies? Indeed, do coherent landscape strategies truly exist, and if they do, what should they encompass?

This Special Issue examines these issues specifically looking at Urban Landscape Futures aiming to provide a critical and definitive exploration of the paradigm surrounding landscape and human interaction within the urban scene, to explore needs and challenges, whether current approaches are fit for purpose or sufficiently resilient to meet future needs or different urban scenarios.

Prof. Dr. Richard Coles
Dr. Sandra Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban landscape
  • landscape futures, health and well-being
  • built environment
  • landscape perception
  • user experience
  • landscape interaction
  • landscape design
  • urban spaces
  • resilient cities
  • sustainable development
  • urban design

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Conceptualising Therapeutic Environments through Culture, Indigenous Knowledge and Landscape for Health and Well-Being
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9125; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13169125 - 14 Aug 2021
Viewed by 733
Abstract
Academic research has long established that interaction with the natural environment is associated with better overall health outcomes. Notably, the area of therapeutic environments has been borne out of the recognition of this critical relationship, but much of this research comes from a [...] Read more.
Academic research has long established that interaction with the natural environment is associated with better overall health outcomes. Notably, the area of therapeutic environments has been borne out of the recognition of this critical relationship, but much of this research comes from a specific Western perspective. In Aotearoa-New Zealand, Māori (the Indigenous people of the land) have long demonstrated significantly worse health outcomes than non-Māori. Little research has examined the causes compared to Western populations and the role of the natural environment in health outcomes for Māori. The present study aimed to explore the relationship between Māori culture, landscape and the connection to health and well-being. Eighteen Māori pāhake (older adults) and kaumātua (elders) took part in semi-structured interviews carried out as focus groups, from June to November 2020. Transcribed interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis and kaupapa Māori techniques. We found five overarching and interrelated key themes related to Indigenous knowledge (Mātauranga Māori) that sit within the realm of therapeutic environments, culture and landscape. A conceptual framework for Therapeutic Cultural Environments (TCE) is proposed in terms of the contribution to our understanding of health and well-being and its implications for conceptualising therapeutic environments and a culturally appropriate model of care for Māori communities. Full article
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