Special Issue "Psychological Development in Early Childhood"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Benito León del Barco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Teacher Training College, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: psychological development; education; physical activity; wellbeing; mental health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Santiago Mendo-Lázaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Teacher Training College, University of Extremadura, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: social and emotional development; cognitive development; physical development, parent–child relationships and parenting programs; early childhood development (ECD) education programs and policies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Psychological Development in Childhood” in Sustainability, a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles in the interdisciplinary area of environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings and provides an advanced forum for studies related to sustainability and sustainable development.

The sustainable development challenges are related to social and emotional, cognitive and physical development in childhood. Children are the basis for all dimensions of sustainable development. Providing children with an optimal level of development, a quality education, and a feeling of safety within the family and school means they will develop their potential and their responsibilities as citizens. Therefore, investment in children is a fundamental means for sustainable development.

This Special Issue aims to explore the current state of social, emotional, cognitive and physical childhood development. Parents are the main source of socialization and development of every person from an early age. It would therefore be of interest to analyze parent–child relationships. Furthermore, this Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the impacts of the education programs and policies on early childhood development.

Finally, this issue is open to reviews, and descriptive or experimental studies that contribute new knowledge to this area, as well as new methodological proposals. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Dr. Benito León del Barco
Dr. Santiago Mendo-Lázaro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable development
  • Childhood development
  • Social development
  • Emotional development
  • Cognitive development
  • Physical development
  • Development disorders
  • Parent–child relationships
  • Social learning
  • Quality learning
  • Health promotion
  • Learning and education
  • Methods of data analysis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Educational Habits on the Learning of 3–6 Year Old Children from the Perspective of Early Childhood Education Teachers
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4388; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12114388 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 871
Abstract
Although early childhood education is crucial for development, it is considered less important than other educational stages. For this reason, we sought to understand teachers’ perceptions about the effects of educational habits on 3–6 year old children’s learning, in addition to their engagement [...] Read more.
Although early childhood education is crucial for development, it is considered less important than other educational stages. For this reason, we sought to understand teachers’ perceptions about the effects of educational habits on 3–6 year old children’s learning, in addition to their engagement and level of commitment to make families assume greater responsibility over their children’s acquisition of habits. Further, differences of opinion were examined according to age, teaching experience, and years of experience at the center. The instrument consisted of twenty variables and four dimensions: working habits and effort, environmental factors and personal hygiene, healthy diets, and collaboration and cooperation. The instrument was sent out via email. Non-probability convenience sampling was performed (n = 320). The methodology used a descriptive and cross-sectional study, incorporating correlational (Pearson correlation) and inferential analyses. Statistics included one-way ANOVA, statistical power, effect size, and Scheffé’s test for multiple comparisons. Educational habits were deemed to have a positive impact, which favored studying. Effects were accentuated in relation to hard work and effort towards learning, with these outcomes being associated with other measured variables. Teachers aged between 34 and 40 years old showed greater commitment and attributed more importance to these habits. Teachers who had been at the school for longer evaluated environmental and hygiene habits more positively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Development in Early Childhood)
Article
A Prospective Study of Cranial Deformity and Delayed Development in Children
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1949; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12051949 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1064
Abstract
Plagiocephaly, the most common form of cranial deformity, has become more prevalent in recent years. Many authors have described a number of sequelae of poorly defined etiologies, although several gaps exist in their real scope. This study aimed to analyze the effects of [...] Read more.
Plagiocephaly, the most common form of cranial deformity, has become more prevalent in recent years. Many authors have described a number of sequelae of poorly defined etiologies, although several gaps exist in their real scope. This study aimed to analyze the effects of physiotherapy treatments and cranial orthoses on the psychomotor development of infants with cranial deformities, complemented by protocolized postural exercises applied by the family. This prospective study on different developmental areas included a sample of 48 breastfeeding infants aged 6 to 18 months who presented with plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome). The Brunet–Lézine scale was used to perform three tests for assessing the psychomotor development of infants, thus offering a measure for global development. The results suggest that plagiocephaly is a marker for the risk of delayed development, particularly in motor and language areas. This delayed development could be improved with physiotherapy and orthopedic treatment, complemented by interventions by the infants´ relatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Development in Early Childhood)
Article
Nature Connection in Early Childhood: A Quantitative Cross-Sectional Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 375; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12010375 - 02 Jan 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2229
Abstract
There have been calls to reconnect children with nature, both for their own wellbeing, as well as for ecological sustainability. This has driven the growth of outdoor and nature-schools for all ages, but especially in the early childhood education sector. However, to date, [...] Read more.
There have been calls to reconnect children with nature, both for their own wellbeing, as well as for ecological sustainability. This has driven the growth of outdoor and nature-schools for all ages, but especially in the early childhood education sector. However, to date, there has not been a quantitative study that looks at whether these settings actually promote nature connection. This paper aims to examine the role of nature nurseries in the promotion of connection to nature, when compared to traditional nurseries. Data were collected on the nature connection, using the Connection to Nature Index for Parents of Preschool Children, of 216 children aged 1–8 years, 132 of whom attended nature nurseries while the rest attended traditional nurseries. Duration and frequency of attendance, sex, and parental nature connection were also reported. Statistical analyses were conducted for overall nature connection scores, individual dimension sub-scores and, for the children who attended nature nursery, against predictors. Results indicate that attending a nature nursery is associated with higher nature connection. Predictors for children’s connection to nature were parental nature connection, and total time spent in attendance of an outdoor nursery. This suggests a dose-response style relationship between attendance and nature connection. Implications for real-life applications are put forward and further research directions are explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Development in Early Childhood)
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Article
Sustainable Debt Behaviour and Well-Being of Young Adults: The Role of Parental Financial Socialisation Process
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7210; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su11247210 - 16 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
Literature shows that parental financial socialisation plays an important role in attaining financial literacy as well as in shaping sustainable financial behaviours and that both translate into increased well-being indicators and financial security on micro- and macroeconomic levels. However, debt literacy and debt [...] Read more.
Literature shows that parental financial socialisation plays an important role in attaining financial literacy as well as in shaping sustainable financial behaviours and that both translate into increased well-being indicators and financial security on micro- and macroeconomic levels. However, debt literacy and debt behaviour seem to be unique. Very little is known about the childhood financial socialisation process through which adults’ sustainable debt behaviour is shaped and how debt behaviour may affect well-being. This study tests a hierarchical model of childhood financial socialisation consisting of five levels: the anticipatory parental socialisation, and later life financial learning outcomes (particularly, debt literacy levels), financial attitudes, debt behaviour, and well-being. Using data collected from a purposive sample of young adult Poles (N = 600) during the period from 10 to 13 November 2018 and employing structural equation modelling, we have found evidence confirming the hierarchical relationship of literacy–attitude–behaviour. Our data do not support, however, either the hypothesised positive relationship between parental socialisation and objectively measured debt literacy or the assumed relationships between debt behaviour and well-being indicators. We posit that country-specific factors related to generational differences entailed by system-wide transition and the specificity of debt behaviour, respectively, are key for explaining these empirical deviations from the assumed conceptual framework. Finally, we found no significant differences between the models estimated separately for maternally conditioned and paternally conditioned respondents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Development in Early Childhood)
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