Special Issue "Urban Transport Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Stefano Carrese
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, Roma Tre University, Via Vito Volterra 62, 00146 Rome, Italy
Interests: transportation engineering; public transport; sustainable transport; transport planning; transport policy; urban mobility
Dr. Sergio Maria Patella
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Faculty of Economics, Universitas Mercatorum, Piazza Mattei 10, 00186 Rome, Italy
Interests: transportation engineering; public transport; sustainable transport; transport planning; transport policy; urban mobility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban transportation has proven to be a particularly difficult sector for the advancement of sustainable development policy, which represents one of the biggest challenges for scholars and policy professionals.

The development of vehicle technologies such as electric vehicles and electric micro-mobility modes, connected and automated vehicles, as well as the progress of sharing mobility services requires new strategies to control the urban transportation system effectively and globally.

There is a need for a system-based vision, and therefore the aim of this Special Issue is to chart new territory in the literature  by exploring ways in which the overall urban transport sustainability can be enhanced.

This call for papers seeks innovative studies to identify synoptic views and approaches for the advancement of sustainable transportation in the urban and metropolitan context.

We welcome both methodological and practice-oriented contributions from the fields of engineering, economics, planning, policy, business and management, as well as any other disciplines that contribute to the scientific understanding of urban transport sustainability. 

Topics of specific interest include, but are not limited to: 

Shared mobility services;

Mobility as a service;

Electric vehicles and electric micro-mobility modes;

Connected and autonomous vehicles;

Intermodal urban mobility;

Cycling;

Walkability;

Accessibility;

Transport equity;

Green vehicles for city logistics;

Crowd shipping and the gig economy.

Prof. Dr. Stefano Carrese
Dr. Sergio Maria Patella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban sustainable mobility
  • urban transportation
  • urban development
  • urban transport policy
  • green vehicles
  • last mile logistics

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The Possibility of Reducing Individual Motorised Traffic through the Location of Collection Points Using the Example of Gdańsk, Poland
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10661; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su131910661 - 25 Sep 2021
Viewed by 503
Abstract
Problems in urban areas at present are caused by the high traffic volumes of motor vehicles. Changing commercial behaviour into e-commerce reduces the need for individual customers to visit shopping centres and increases the need for freight transport to geographically dispersed consumers. In [...] Read more.
Problems in urban areas at present are caused by the high traffic volumes of motor vehicles. Changing commercial behaviour into e-commerce reduces the need for individual customers to visit shopping centres and increases the need for freight transport to geographically dispersed consumers. In this case, one solution to reduce the number of lorry journeys may be collection points, such as a network of parcel lockers. However, the use of collection points has only a limited impact on reducing the number of cars on the streets because half of the journeys to parcel lockers are still made by car. This study assumes that consumers’ choice of how to collect their parcels depends on the available infrastructure and the time needed to reach the pick-up point, which depends on the distance from the place of residence/work/school. The purpose of this research was to analyse the location of collection points in relation to the alternative infrastructure and places of residence/work/school using Gdańsk, Poland, as an example. The analysis showed that collection points are usually easily accessible by car, are not always accessible by foot, and in only a few cases are easily accessible by bicycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Transport Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Developing a Traffic Model to Estimate Vehicle Emissions: An Application in Seoul, Korea
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9761; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13179761 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 527
Abstract
In this study, a traffic demand model was created based on a simulation network, and another model was built to calculate exhaust-gas emissions generated by vehicles based on the emission function. Subsequently, emissions for three scenarios were analyzed based on the traffic restriction [...] Read more.
In this study, a traffic demand model was created based on a simulation network, and another model was built to calculate exhaust-gas emissions generated by vehicles based on the emission function. Subsequently, emissions for three scenarios were analyzed based on the traffic restriction policy according to the vehicle grading system implemented in Seoul. According to the results of the analysis, emission reduction under the vehicle restriction policy was the highest among passenger cars in the low-speed range, while the emissions of cargo trucks in the high-speed range were found to be high. The emissions showed a high ratio of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides, and high emissions were generated from liquefied petroleum gas and diesel vehicles. Furthermore, the effects of vehicle restriction policy were confirmed to reduce emissions from diesel and other vehicle types. Using the established model, we were able to confirm that the vehicle restriction policy contributed to the improvement of air quality. Furthermore, the diesel vehicle restriction policy also had an impact on reducing the emissions of vehicle types other than those using diesel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Transport Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
“I’ll Take the E-Scooter Instead of My Car”—The Potential of E-Scooters as a Substitute for Car Trips in Germany
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7361; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13137361 - 30 Jun 2021
Viewed by 645
Abstract
Considering the controversial discussion about the sustainability and usefulness of e-scooters, in this study, we analyzed the substitution potential of e-scooters, especially with regard to car trips. Based on data from the national mobility survey in Germany (Mobility in Germany, MiD 2017), we [...] Read more.
Considering the controversial discussion about the sustainability and usefulness of e-scooters, in this study, we analyzed the substitution potential of e-scooters, especially with regard to car trips. Based on data from the national mobility survey in Germany (Mobility in Germany, MiD 2017), we identified trips that could be covered purely by an e-scooter. Thereby, trip length, trip purposes, weather conditions, and other influencing factors were taken into account. Our analysis showed that, in Germany, 10–15% of the motorized individual transport (MIT) trips could be made by e-scooter. Accompanied by a literature analysis, we then critically reflected on the overall potential of e-scooters and formulated recommendations for urban and transport planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Transport Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Mobility Styles and Car Ownership—Potentials for a Sustainable Urban Transport
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2968; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13052968 - 09 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 657
Abstract
Decision-makers in cities worldwide have the responsibility to contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in urban transport. Therefore, effective measures and policies that allow for a change in people’s mobility towards sustainable mobility must be derived. To understand how different people [...] Read more.
Decision-makers in cities worldwide have the responsibility to contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in urban transport. Therefore, effective measures and policies that allow for a change in people’s mobility towards sustainable mobility must be derived. To understand how different people respond to measures and policies, and to increase the effectiveness of such policies, individual mobility needs and mobility determinants have to be considered. For this, the definition of individual mobility styles as holistic descriptions considering travel behavior, attitudes, as well as life stages is useful. This study presents a segmentation approach that identifies eight urban mobility styles by using data from a multidimensional survey conducted in Berlin and San Francisco. We applied a cluster analysis with both behavioral and attitudinal characteristics as segmentation criteria. By analyzing the characteristics, we identified a mobility style—the Environmentally Oriented Multimodals—that is environmentally oriented, but not yet all people in this cluster are sustainable in their mobility. Thus, they are the group with the highest potential to accept and use sustainable mobility. Additionally, we found that within the Environmentally Oriented Multimodals, the change from one life stage to another is also likely to be accompanied by a car acquisition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Transport Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Assessing the Performance of Modal Interchange for Ensuring Seamless and Sustainable Mobility in European Cities
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 1001; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13021001 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 703
Abstract
In the European Union, more than 70% of the population lives in urban areas. Achieving more efficient and low-carbon mobility is crucial to ensuring urban systems are sustainable and tackling important challenges, such as reduction of CO2 emissions, air and noise pollution, [...] Read more.
In the European Union, more than 70% of the population lives in urban areas. Achieving more efficient and low-carbon mobility is crucial to ensuring urban systems are sustainable and tackling important challenges, such as reduction of CO2 emissions, air and noise pollution, and traffic congestion. Identifying effective strategies and design solutions that boost multimodal mobility and effective interchange among different sustainable means of transport can be a significant contribution in this area. This paper presents an easy-to-use methodology to assess the performance of policy measures and design solutions-oriented to foster modal interchange, with special regard to the configuration of the interchange hubs. The methodology is based on identifying key factors necessary to ensure an efficient multimodal interchange and the different types of interchanges that are frequently present in the urban realm. By grouping the key factors into nine different domains, and by weighing the key factors in relation to their importance, the methodology creates a decision support system to assess the performance of the current interchange, as well as of different planning and design scenarios. This methodology has been developed in the framework of the Interreg Europe MATCH-UP project and is conceived to support both designers and decision-makers whenever they have to reorganise existing transport hubs and policies, or design and plan new ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Transport Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop