Special Issue "Quantum Imaging"

A special issue of Technologies (ISSN 2227-7080). This special issue belongs to the section "Quantum Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2016).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yanhua Shih
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Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Mr. Ronald E. Meyers
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Guest Editor
US Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783, USA
Interests: quantum imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ghost imaging:

In 1995, Pittman et al. demonstrated a non-traditional imaging mechanism using entangled photon pairs, which is now called “ghost imaging” by the physics and engineering communities, perhaps due to its incomprehensible nature. However, quantum theory has provided a reasonable solution: ghost imaging is the result of two-photon interference where a pair of photons interferes with the pair itself at a distance. In fact, two-photon interference is not restricted to entangled photons; randomly paired photons in a thermal state also produce this effect. Ten years later, ghost imaging was demonstrated with chaotic-thermal light by annihilating two randomly paired photons in coincidences. Ghost imaging has received a great deal of attention, and, in the past twenty years, a number of different ghost imaging approaches have been proposed or developed. Some of them took advantage of nonlocal multi-photon interference, while some of them were simple classical simulations. Compared with classical imaging, the two-photon interference approach has three attractive features: (1) the ghost image can be taken in a “nonlocal” manner, i.e., imaging a target that a classical camera cannot “see” directly. (2) The imaging resolution is mainly determined by the angular diameter of the light source. For example, ghost images of sunlight may achieve 200 micrometer resolution because the sun has an angular diameter of 0.5 degrees, which is very useful for distant imaging applications, such as satellite imaging. In order to take an image at 10 kilometers, and achieve 200 micrometer resolution, a classical camera would need to have a 90-meter imaging lens. (3) Ghost images are turbulence-free; atmospheric turbulence would not affect either the resolution or the quality of the ghost image. Although we are still struggling with some technical difficulties, the non-traditional imaging mechanism of ghost imaging will permeate our lives soon in the light of new technology.

Prof. Yanhua Shih
Ronald E. Meyers
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • optical imaging
  • ghost imaging
  • non-classical resolution imaging
  • turbulence-free imaging
  • coincidence imaging
  • two-photon interference

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Physics of Turbulence-Free Ghost Imaging
Technologies 2016, 4(4), 39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies4040039 - 08 Dec 2016
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3344
Abstract
Since its first experimental demonstration, ghost imaging has attracted a great deal of attention due to interests in its fundamental nature and its potential applications. In terms of applications, the most interesting and useful feature, perhaps, is the turbulence insensitivity of thermal light [...] Read more.
Since its first experimental demonstration, ghost imaging has attracted a great deal of attention due to interests in its fundamental nature and its potential applications. In terms of applications, the most interesting and useful feature, perhaps, is the turbulence insensitivity of thermal light ghost imaging, i.e., atmospheric turbulence would not have any influence on the ghost images of sunlight. Inspired by ghost imaging, a new type of camera is ready for turbulence-free imaging applications. This turbulence-free camera would be especially useful for long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging. How could fluctuations of thermal light produce an image? Why is it turbulence-free? This article addresses these questions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Imaging)
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Article
Correlation Plenoptic Imaging With Entangled Photons
Technologies 2016, 4(2), 17; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies4020017 - 07 Jun 2016
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3102
Abstract
Plenoptic imaging is a novel optical technique for three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. It is enabled by the simultaneous measurement of both the location and the propagation direction of light in a given scene. In the standard approach, the maximum spatial and [...] Read more.
Plenoptic imaging is a novel optical technique for three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. It is enabled by the simultaneous measurement of both the location and the propagation direction of light in a given scene. In the standard approach, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are inversely proportional, and so are the resolution and the maximum achievable depth of focus of the 3D image. We have recently proposed a method to overcome such fundamental limits by combining plenoptic imaging with an intriguing correlation remote-imaging technique: ghost imaging. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that correlation plenoptic imaging can be effectively achieved by exploiting the position-momentum entanglement characterizing spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) photon pairs. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we shall show that correlation plenoptic imaging with entangled photons may enable the refocusing of an out-of-focus image at the same depth of focus of a standard plenoptic device, but without sacrificing diffraction-limited image resolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Imaging)
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Article
Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution
Technologies 2016, 4(2), 12; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies4020012 - 18 Apr 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2226
Abstract
We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is [...] Read more.
We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Imaging)
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