Special Issue "Additive Manufacturing: Fundamentals and Practice"

A special issue of Technologies (ISSN 2227-7080). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anna Okunkova
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Guest Editor
Department of High-Efficiency Processing Technologies, Moscow State University of Technology «STANKIN», Vadkovsky per. 1, 127055, Moscow, Russia
Interests: additive manufacturing; electrical erosion; ceramics; metals; alloys
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Analysis of the modern production market and industry shows that up to 60% can be products produced by additive manufacturing in the production of the responsible metallic parts. Simultaneously, the technology develops, and plenty of authors present their ideas on improving its surface quality, productivity, solutions for jerk problems, improving the parts’ exploitation properties, and introducing a new class of materials to be produced by additive manufacturing and new approaches.

The Special Issue is devoted to the growing importance of additive manufacturing for productions from metallic, ceramic, and composite materials. Original research and review articles devoted to the latest achievements in additive manufacturing are welcome for publication. The submission can be devoted to researching the actual science-intensive problem of additive manufacturing or the mathematical support and physical explanation for the observed phenomena in the working zone.

Possible topics can be methods and techniques to improve the surface quality and functionality of working surfaces of the parts, produced by additive manufacturing, improvement of production productivity, research on the solutions for actual problems (jerk), improvement of physical, mechanical, and exploitation characteristics of the parts, development approach in the creation of new composites produced by additive manufacturing, introduction of new materials (ceramics, steels, alloys, high-entropy alloys) for additive manufacturing, development of mathematical support, and physical explanation for additive manufacturing fundamentals.

Dr. Anna Okunkova
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Technologies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing
  • Surface quality
  • Functionality
  • Productivity
  • Jerk
  • Post-processing
  • Metals
  • Ceramics
  • Composites
  • Properties
  • Phenomena
  • Fundamentals

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Influence of Postprocessing on Wear Resistance of Aerospace Steel Parts Produced by Laser Powder Bed Fusion
Technologies 2020, 8(4), 73; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies8040073 - 02 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 900
Abstract
The paper is devoted to the research of the effect of ultrasonic postprocessing—specifically, the effects of ultrasonic cavitation-abrasive finishing, ultrasonic plastic deformation, and vibration tumbling on surface quality, wear resistance, and the ability of real aircraft parts with complex geometries and with sizes [...] Read more.
The paper is devoted to the research of the effect of ultrasonic postprocessing—specifically, the effects of ultrasonic cavitation-abrasive finishing, ultrasonic plastic deformation, and vibration tumbling on surface quality, wear resistance, and the ability of real aircraft parts with complex geometries and with sizes less than and more than 100 mm to work in exploitation conditions. The parts were produced by laser powder bed fusion from two types of anticorrosion steels of austenitic and martensitic grades—20Kh13 (DIN 1.4021, X20Cr13, AISI 420) and 12Kh18N9T (DIN 1.4541, X10CrNiTi18-10, AISI 321). The finishing technologies based on mechanical action—plastic deformation, abrasive wear, and complex mechanolysis showed an effect on reducing the submicron surface roughness, removing the trapped powder granules from the manufactured functional surfaces and their wear resistance. The tests were completed by proving resistance of the produced parts to exploitation conditions—vibration fatigue and corrosion in salt fog. The roughness arithmetic mean deviation Ra was improved by 50–52% after cavitation-abrasive finishing, by 28–30% after ultrasonic plastic deformation, and by 65–70% after vibratory tumbling. The effect on wear resistance is correlated with the improved roughness. The effect of used techniques on resistance to abrasive wear was explained and grounded. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing: Fundamentals and Practice)
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Review

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Review
Surface Quality of Metal Parts Produced by Laser Powder Bed Fusion: Ion Polishing in Gas-Discharge Plasma Proposal
Technologies 2021, 9(2), 27; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/technologies9020027 - 09 Apr 2021
Viewed by 737
Abstract
Additive manufacturing has evolved over the past decades into a technology that provides freedom of design through the ability to produce complex-shaped solid structures, reducing the operational time and material volumes in manufacturing significantly. However, the surface of parts manufactured by the additive [...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing has evolved over the past decades into a technology that provides freedom of design through the ability to produce complex-shaped solid structures, reducing the operational time and material volumes in manufacturing significantly. However, the surface of parts manufactured by the additive method remains now extremely rough. The current trend of expanding the industrial application of additive manufacturing is researching surface roughness and finishing. Moreover, the limited choice of materials suitable for additive manufacturing does not satisfy the diverse design requirements, necessitating additional coatings deposition. Requirements for surface treatment and coating deposition technology depend on the intended use of the parts, their material, and technology. In most cases, they cannot be determined based on existing knowledge and experience. It determines the scientific relevance of the analytical research and development of scientific and technological principles of finishing parts obtained by laser additive manufacturing and functional coating deposition. There is a scientific novelty of analytical research that proposes gas-discharge plasma processing for finishing laser additive manufactured parts and technological principles development including three processing stages—explosive ablation, polishing with a concentrated beam of fast neutral argon atoms, and coating deposition—for the first time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing: Fundamentals and Practice)
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