Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 15th European Fusarium Seminar"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kris Audenaert
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Guest Editor
Department of Plants and Crops, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Valentin Vaerwyckweg 1, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: plant–pathogen interactions; biocontrol; endophytic fungi; green leaf volatiles (GLVs); biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs); plant defense priming; plant hormones; phenomics; genome-editing in fungi; plant defense pathways; biodegradation of mycotoxins; mycotoxin prediction and modelling; bioassays to assess toxicity of trichothecenes and their derivatives
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The 15th European Fusarium Seminar, organized by Ghent University, will be held online from May 31 to June 1, 2021.

Fusarium is one of the most important plant pathogenic fungal genera. Economic losses both in monocots and eudicots are due to direct yield losses as well as due to the presence of toxic metabolites called mycotoxins that are produced by many species within the Fusarium genus. The challenges in Fusarium research are still enormous due to the frequency, complexity and variability in the occurrence of this pathogen.

We would like to welcome you to the 15th edition of the European Fusarium Seminar. The program includes oral and poster presentations on topics that provide new insights into the different Fusarium research fields: Fusarium–Host Interactions, Integrated and Innovative Fusarium Management, Secondary Metabolites, Non-Cereal Plant Fusarium Interactions, Population Genetics and New Technologies. 

The Symposium welcomes participants from industry, government, as well as academia. Only through our multidisciplinary efforts and concerted actions, can we further progress and expect solutions in the Fusarium research field. This Special Issue aims to bring together active researchers to present their current work. For additional information on the Seminar which you may find useful, please follow: http://en.mytox.be/conferences/

Prof. Dr. Kris Audenaert
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fusarium population genetics
  • mitigation strategies
  • new technologies
  • plant–host interactions
  • Fusarium interacting with non-cereal hosts

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Naturally Occurring Fusarium Species and Mycotoxins in Oat Grains from Manitoba, Canada
Toxins 2021, 13(9), 670; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13090670 - 18 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Fusarium head blight (FHB) can lead to dramatic yield losses and mycotoxin contamination in small grain cereals in Canada. To assess the extent and severity of FHB in oat, samples collected from 168 commercial oat fields in the province of Manitoba, Canada, during [...] Read more.
Fusarium head blight (FHB) can lead to dramatic yield losses and mycotoxin contamination in small grain cereals in Canada. To assess the extent and severity of FHB in oat, samples collected from 168 commercial oat fields in the province of Manitoba, Canada, during 2016–2018 were analyzed for the occurrence of Fusarium head blight and associated mycotoxins. Through morphological and molecular analysis, F. poae was found to be the predominant Fusarium species affecting oat, followed by F. graminearum, F. sporotrichioides, F. avenaceum, and F. culmorum. Deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV), type B trichothecenes, were the two most abundant Fusarium mycotoxins detected in oat. Beauvericin (BEA) was also frequently detected, though at lower concentrations. Close clustering of F. poae and NIV/BEA, F. graminearum and DON, and F. sporotrichioides and HT2/T2 (type A trichothecenes) was detected in the principal component analysis. Sampling location and crop rotation significantly impacted the concentrations of Fusarium mycotoxins in oat. A phylogenetic analysis of 95 F. poae strains from Manitoba was conducted using the concatenated nucleotide sequences of Tef-1α, Tri1, and Tri8 genes. The results indicated that all F. poae strains belong to a monophyletic lineage. Four subgroups of F. poae strains were identified; however, no correlations were observed between the grouping of F. poae strains and sample locations/crop rotations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 15th European Fusarium Seminar)
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Article
Phylogeny and Mycotoxin Profile of Pathogenic Fusarium Species Isolated from Sudden Decline Syndrome and Leaf Wilt Symptoms on Date Palms (Phoenix dactylifera) in Tunisia
Toxins 2021, 13(7), 463; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13070463 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1081
Abstract
In 2017–2018, extensive symptoms of sudden decline and fruit rot were observed on date palms in southern Tunisia. Samples of diseased plants were randomly collected in six localities. Based on morphological identification, Fusarium was the most frequent fungal genus detected. A sequencing of [...] Read more.
In 2017–2018, extensive symptoms of sudden decline and fruit rot were observed on date palms in southern Tunisia. Samples of diseased plants were randomly collected in six localities. Based on morphological identification, Fusarium was the most frequent fungal genus detected. A sequencing of translation elongation factor, calmodulin, and second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II genes was used to identify 63 representative Fusarium strains at species level and investigate their phylogenetic relationships. The main species detected was Fusarium proliferatum, and at a much lesser extent, Fusarium brachygibbosum, Fusarium caatingaense, Fusarium clavum, Fusarium incarnatum, and Fusarium solani. Pathogenicity on the Deglet Nour variety plantlets and the capability to produce mycotoxins were also assessed. All Fusarium species were pathogenic complying Koch’s postulates. Fusarium proliferatum strains produced mainly fumonisins (FBs), beauvericin (BEA), and, to a lesser extent, enniatins (ENNs) and moniliformin (MON). All F. brachygibbosum strains produced low levels of BEA, diacetoxyscirpenol, and neosolaniol; two strains produced also T-2 toxin, and a single strain produced HT-2 toxin. Fusarium caatingaense, F. clavum, F. incarnatum produced only BEA. Fusarium solani strains produced MON, BEA, and ENNs. This work reports for the first time a comprehensive multidisciplinary study of Fusarium species on date palms, concerning both phytopathological and food safety issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the 15th European Fusarium Seminar)
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