Special Issue "Detection and Control of Plant and Fungal Metabolites: An Application in Human Life"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kristina Habschied
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
J.J. Strossmayer University of Osijek, Faculty of Food Technology Osijek; F. Kuhača 20, 31 000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: beer; malt; Fusarium; mycotoxins; food contaminants; meat products; PAH’s wheat malt; beer; wheat beer
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to announce the launch of a new Special Issue of Toxins on the topic of “Detection and Control of Plant and Fungal Metabolites: An application in Human Life”, whose aim is to introduce novel and up-to-date detection methods used in control and suppression of different fungal and plant metabolites. Secondary metabolites originating from fungi are usually harmful for humans and animals and have a negative economic impact on agriculture and the food industry. Many of them are well known and are included in legislation, but there are plenty of newly detected fungal metabolites that need to be investigated, and their toxicity should be assessed. Plants tend to secrete toxic metabolites (deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, zearalenone-4-sulphate, lotaustralin, etc.) when in stressful conditions such as fungal attack, meaning that plant metabolites are also present in the food chain and should be given more attention. These include aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus spp., trichothecenes, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium spp., ochratoxin by Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp., unspecific metabolites (brevianamide F, citreorosein, emodin, rugulusovin, tryptophol, etc.), and plant metabolites (deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, zearalenone-4-sulphate, lotaustralin, etc.). Topics of interest include the genetics and biology of fungal and plant metabolite control, metabolite detection, plant breeding and selection for resistance, biocontrol, ecology/evolution of mycotoxigenic fungi, medically important mycotoxigenic fungi, mycotoxin risk assessment, and regulatory issues.

Prof. Dr. Kristina Mastanjević
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mycotoxins
  • multitoxins
  • metabolite control and suppression
  • biocontrol
  • novel detection methods
  • plant selection for resistance
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Analytical Separation of Carcinogenic and Genotoxic Alkenylbenzenes in Foods and Related Products (2010–2020)
Toxins 2021, 13(6), 387; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13060387 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
Alkenylbenzenes are potentially toxic (genotoxic and carcinogenic) compounds present in plants such as basil, tarragon, anise star and lemongrass. These plants are found in various edible consumer products, e.g., popularly used to flavour food. Thus, there are concerns about the possible health consequences [...] Read more.
Alkenylbenzenes are potentially toxic (genotoxic and carcinogenic) compounds present in plants such as basil, tarragon, anise star and lemongrass. These plants are found in various edible consumer products, e.g., popularly used to flavour food. Thus, there are concerns about the possible health consequences upon increased exposure to alkenylbenzenes especially due to food intake. It is therefore important to constantly monitor the amounts of alkenylbenzenes in our food chain. A major challenge in the determination of alkenylbenzenes in foods is the complexity of the sample matrices and the typically low amounts of alkenylbenzenes present. This review will therefore discuss the background and importance of analytical separation methods from papers reported from 2010 to 2020 for the determination of alkenylbenzenes in foods and related products. The separation techniques commonly used were gas and liquid chromatography (LC). The sample preparation techniques used in conjunction with the separation techniques were various variants of extraction (solvent extraction, liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-phase microextraction, solid phase extraction) and distillation (steam and hydro-). Detection was by flame ionisation and mass spectrometry (MS) in gas chromatography (GC) while in liquid chromatography was mainly by spectrophotometry. Full article
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Review
Possibilities for the Biological Control of Mycotoxins in Food and Feed
Toxins 2021, 13(3), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins13030198 - 10 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 858
Abstract
Seeking useful biological agents for mycotoxin detoxification has achieved success in the last twenty years thanks to the participation of many multidisciplinary teams. We have recently witnessed discoveries in the fields of bacterial genetics (inclusive of next-generation sequencing), protein encoding, and bioinformatics that [...] Read more.
Seeking useful biological agents for mycotoxin detoxification has achieved success in the last twenty years thanks to the participation of many multidisciplinary teams. We have recently witnessed discoveries in the fields of bacterial genetics (inclusive of next-generation sequencing), protein encoding, and bioinformatics that have helped to shape the latest perception of how microorganisms/mycotoxins/environmental factors intertwine and interact, so the road is opened for new breakthroughs. Analysis of literature data related to the biological control of mycotoxins indicates the ability of yeast, bacteria, fungi and enzymes to degrade or adsorb mycotoxins, which increases the safety and quality of susceptible crops, animal feed and, ultimately, food of animal origin (milk, meat and eggs) by preventing the presence of residues. Microbial detoxification (transformation and adsorption) is becoming a trustworthy strategy that leaves no or less toxic compounds and contributes to food security. This review summarizes the data and highlights the importance and prospects of these methods. Full article
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