Special Issue "Research on Pathogenic Fungi and Mycotoxins in China"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Shihua Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Fungi and Mycotoxins of Fujian Province, Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology of Education Ministry, School of Life Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
Interests: fungi; secondary metabolite; mycotoxins; Aspergillus; aflatoxins; biosynthetic pathway; antibody; detection; regulation; controlling; post-translation modification
Prof. Dr. Yang Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Engineering, Foshan University, Foshan 528231, China
Interests: mycotoxin-producing fungi; mycotoxins; biological detoxification; detoxification enzyme; metabolite and toxicity; biosynthetic pathway; prevention and control Email: [email protected]
Prof. Dr. Qi Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Reference Lab for Agricultural Testing (Biotoxin), Key Lab of Detection for Mycotoxin, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs PRC, Lab of Quality & Safety Risk Assessment for Oilseeds Products (Wuhan), Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs PRC, Oil Crops Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan 430062, China
Interests: mycotoxin; antibody; nanobody; immunoassay; sensor; diagnosis; prediction; warning; prevention; reduction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The pathogenic fungi are abundant and diverse in China, which not only directly affect the health of plants, animals, and humans but can also produce mycotoxins in China. To control pathogenic fungi, Chinese researchers have made great progress in the species identification, construction of detection methods, and pathogenic mechanism of these fungi. Importantly, mycotoxins, as the most important hazards, threaten the sustainable development of food security and feed safety. Research on the biosynthesis and regulation of mycotoxins is very important for controlling mycotoxins. Detection, especially on-site rapid detection, is a means to discover the risk of mycotoxins. Prediction and early warning is a critical way to prevent and control pollution and hazards of mycotoxins. Meanwhile, detoxification is the ideal way to reduce the hazardous effect of mycotoxins. Hence, this topic is very welcome, but not limited to the research progress of mycotoxin production, biosynthesis, and regulation of mechanisms of secondary metabolites, control of mycotoxins, detection, prediction and early warning, detoxification, and prevention and control for pathogenic fungi and mycotoxins in China.

Prof. Dr. Shihua Wang
Prof. Dr. Yang Liu
Dr. Qi Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pathogenic fungi
  • mycotoxins
  • biosynthesis mechanism
  • detection
  • prediction and warning
  • detoxification
  • prevention and control
  • pathogenic mechanism

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
The Effects of Zearalenone on the Localization and Expression of Reproductive Hormones in the Ovaries of Weaned Gilts
Toxins 2021, 13(9), 626; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13090626 - 07 Sep 2021
Viewed by 337
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the effects of zearalenone (ZEA) on the localizations and expressions of follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) in the ovaries of weaned gilts. Twenty 42-day-old [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate the effects of zearalenone (ZEA) on the localizations and expressions of follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) in the ovaries of weaned gilts. Twenty 42-day-old weaned gilts were randomly allocated into two groups, and treated with a control diet and a ZEA-contaminated diet (ZEA 1.04 mg/kg), respectively. After 7-day adjustment, gilts were fed individually for 35 days and euthanized for blood and ovarian samples collection before morning feeding on the 36th day. Serum hormones of E2, PRG, FSH, LH and GnRH were determined using radioimmunoassay kits. The ovaries were collected for relative mRNA and protein expression, and immunohistochemical analysis of FSHR, LHR, GnRH and GnRHR. The results revealed that ZEA exposure significantly increased the final vulva area (p < 0.05), significantly elevated the serum concentrations of estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone and GnRH (p < 0.05), and markedly up-regulated the mRNA and protein expressions of FSHR, LHR, GnRH and GnRHR (p < 0.05). Besides, the results of immunohistochemistry showed that the immunoreactive substances of ovarian FSHR, LHR, GnRH and GnRHR in the gilts fed the ZEA-contaminated diet were stronger than the gilts fed the control diet. Our findings indicated that dietary ZEA (1.04 mg/kg) could cause follicular proliferation by interfering with the localization and expression of FSHR, LHR, GnRH and GnRHR, and then affect the follicular development of weaned gilts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Pathogenic Fungi and Mycotoxins in China)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Response of Fecal Bacterial Flora to the Exposure of Fumonisin B1 in BALB/c Mice
Toxins 2021, 13(9), 612; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13090612 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 377
Abstract
Fumonisins are a kind of mycotoxin that has harmful influence on the health of humans and animals. Although some research studies associated with fumonisins have been reported, the regulatory limits of fumonisins are imperfect, and the effects of fumonisins on fecal bacterial flora [...] Read more.
Fumonisins are a kind of mycotoxin that has harmful influence on the health of humans and animals. Although some research studies associated with fumonisins have been reported, the regulatory limits of fumonisins are imperfect, and the effects of fumonisins on fecal bacterial flora of mice have not been suggested. In this study, in order to investigate the effects of fumonisin B1 (FB1) on fecal bacterial flora, BALB/c mice were randomly divided into seven groups, which were fed intragastrically with 0 mg/kg, 0.018 mg/kg, 0.054 mg/kg, 0.162 mg/kg, 0.486 mg/kg, 1.458 mg/kg and 4.374 mg/kg of FB1 solutions, once a day for 8 weeks. Subsequently, feces were collected for analysis of microflora. The V3-V4 16S rRNA of fecal bacterial flora was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. The results revealed that fecal bacterial flora of mice treated with FB1 presented high diversity. Additionally, the composition of fecal bacterial flora of FB1 exposure groups showed marked differences from that of the control group, especially for the genus types including Alloprevotella, Prevotellaceae_NK3B31_group, Rikenellaceae_RC9_gut_group, Parabacteroides and phylum types including Cyanobacteria. In conclusion, our data indicate that FB1 alters the diversity and composition of fecal microbiota in mice. Moreover, the minimum dose of FB1 exposure also causes changes in fecal microbiota to some extent. This study is the first to focus on the dose-related effect of FB1 exposure on fecal microbiota in rodent animals and gives references to the regulatory doses of fumonisins for better protection of human and animal health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Pathogenic Fungi and Mycotoxins in China)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop