Special Issue "Remediation Strategies for Mycotoxin in Animal Feed"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Niel Karrow
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G2W1, Canada
Interests: animal science; genetics; immunology; immune response; mycotoxins
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lvhui Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: animal nutrition; feed safety; mycotoxins; animal health; selenium
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mycotoxins widely occur in various feedstuffs. So far, more than 500 mycotoxins have been identified. Generally, aflatoxin B1, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, fumonisin B1, ochratoxin A and T-2 toxin are primary mycotoxins that occur in animal feed; these can seriously threaten an animal’s health and its production, as well as the quality and safety of its products. Therefore, development of counteracting strategies for mycotoxin control has received increasing attention from scientists and the feed industry.

This Special Issue is devoted to collecting research and reviews that focus on recent advances in decontamination of these common mycotoxins in feed. In particular, this issue is interested in receiving studies that are focused on the development of 1) novel microorganisms or their enzymes which can biodegrade the mycotoxins; 2) nutritional strategies to help in the mitigation of mycotoxicoses; 3) novel modified adsorbents to reduce the toxicity of mycotoxins in livestock and poultry. In addition, better understanding of the toxicity of these mycotoxins could help the development of future antidotes, thus relative studies are also welcome.

Prof. Niel Karrow
Prof. Lvhui Sun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mycotoxins
  • feed safety
  • animal health
  • animal production
  • remediation

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Adsorbents Reduce Aflatoxin M1 Residue in Milk of Healthy Dairy Cow Exposed to Moderate Level Aflatoxin B1 in Diet and Its Exposure Risk for Humans
Toxins 2021, 13(9), 665; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13090665 (registering DOI) - 17 Sep 2021
Viewed by 289
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of moderate risk level (8 µg/kg) AFB1 in diet supplemented with or without adsorbents on lactation performance, serum parameters, milk AFM1 content of healthy lactating cows and the AFM1 residue exposure risk in different human [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effect of moderate risk level (8 µg/kg) AFB1 in diet supplemented with or without adsorbents on lactation performance, serum parameters, milk AFM1 content of healthy lactating cows and the AFM1 residue exposure risk in different human age groups. Forty late healthy lactating Holstein cows (270 ± 22 d in milk; daily milk yield 21 ± 3.1 kg/d) were randomly assigned to four treatments: control diet without AFB1 and adsorbents (CON), CON with 8 μg/kg AFB1 (dry matter basis, AF), AF + 15 g/d adsorbent 1 (AD1), AF + 15 g/d adsorbent 2 (AD2). The experiment lasted for 19 days, including an AFB1-challenge phase (day 1 to 14) and an AFB1-withdraw phase (day 15 to 19). Results showed that both AFB1 and adsorbents treatments had no significant effects on the DMI, milk yield, 3.5% FCM yield, milk components and serum parameters. Compared with the AF, AD1 and AD2 had significantly lower milk AFM1 concentrations (93 ng/L vs. 46 ng/L vs. 51 ng/L) and transfer rates of dietary AFB1 into milk AFM1 (1.16% vs. 0.57% vs. 0.63%) (p < 0.05). Children aged 2–4 years old had the highest exposure risk to AFM1 in milk in AF, with an EDI of 1.02 ng/kg bw/day and a HI of 5.11 (HI > 1 indicates a potential risk for liver cancer). Both AD1 and AD2 had obviously reductions in EDI and HI for all population groups, whereas, the EDI (≥0.25 ng/kg bw/day) and HI (≥1.23) of children aged 2–11 years old were still higher than the suggested tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.20 ng/kg bw/day and 1.00 (HI). In conclusion, moderate risk level AFB1 in the diet of healthy lactating cows could cause a public health hazard and adding adsorbents in the dairy diet is an effective measure to remit AFM1 residue in milk and its exposure risk for humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remediation Strategies for Mycotoxin in Animal Feed)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
DL-Selenomethionine Alleviates Oxidative Stress Induced by Zearalenone via Nrf2/Keap1 Signaling Pathway in IPEC-J2 Cells
Toxins 2021, 13(8), 557; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13080557 - 10 Aug 2021
Viewed by 746
Abstract
Zearalenone (ZEN) is a kind of nonsteroidal mycotoxin that is considered a risk affecting the safety of human food and livestock feed that causes oxidative damages in mammalian cells. Selenomethionine (SeMet) was indicated to have antioxidant activity and received great interest in investigating [...] Read more.
Zearalenone (ZEN) is a kind of nonsteroidal mycotoxin that is considered a risk affecting the safety of human food and livestock feed that causes oxidative damages in mammalian cells. Selenomethionine (SeMet) was indicated to have antioxidant activity and received great interest in investigating the role of SeMet as a therapeutic agent in oxidation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the hormetic role of DL-SeMet in porcine intestinal epithelial J2 (IPEC-J2) cells against ZEN-induced oxidative stress injury. As a result of this experiment, 30 μg/mL of ZEN was observed with significantly statistical effects in cell viability. Following the dose-dependent manner, 20 μg/mL was chosen for the subsequent experiments. Then, further results in the current study showed that the ZENinduced oxidative stress with subsequent suppression of the expression of antioxidant stress pathway-related genes species. Moreover, SeMet reversed the oxidative damage and cell death of ZEN toxins to some extent, by a Nrf2/Keap1-ARE pathway. The finding of this experiment provided a foundation for further research on the ZEN-caused cell oxidative damage and the cure technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remediation Strategies for Mycotoxin in Animal Feed)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Photocatalytic Degradation of Deoxynivalenol Using Cerium Doped Titanium Dioxide under Ultraviolet Light Irradiation
Toxins 2021, 13(7), 481; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13070481 - 11 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 821
Abstract
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin with high toxicity that often contaminates grains, foods and feeds. The traditional approaches for DON removal are difficult to meet industry and agriculture demands due to the high stability of the DON molecule. Therefore, there is an [...] Read more.
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin with high toxicity that often contaminates grains, foods and feeds. The traditional approaches for DON removal are difficult to meet industry and agriculture demands due to the high stability of the DON molecule. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop green and effective strategies for DON degradation. In this study, a batch of photocatalytic nanomaterials of cerium (Ce) doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) were successfully prepared by sol-gel method. The catalysts were systematically characterized by XRD, HRTEM, FT-IR, UV-Vis and XPS. The catalyst 0.5Ce-TiO2 showed superior photocatalytic activity for DON degradation in aqueous solution under ultraviolet light irradiation, better than that of traditional photocatalyst pure TiO2, and 96% DON with initial concentration of 5.0 mg/L could be degraded in 4 h. In addition, the two possible degradation intermediate products C5H8O3 and C17H18O6 were identified, the photocatalytic degradation mechanism and degradation pathway were studied. The results indicate that Ce doped TiO2 photocatalyst can be used to reduce DON effectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remediation Strategies for Mycotoxin in Animal Feed)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop