Special Issue "Foodborne Filamentous Fungi and Mycotoxins: Detection and Prevention Research"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alicia Rodríguez
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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Production and Food Science, Food Quality and Microbiology, University Institute for the Research in Agrifood Resources-INURA, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: food microbiology and safety, food mycology, foodborne pathogens, mycotoxins, gene expression, molecular ecology and biology; food science and technology; biocontrol and analytical methods, plant pathology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alberto Martín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Science and Nutrition Area, University Institute for the Research in Agri-food Resources-INURA, Universidad de Extremadura, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: food chemnistry; food analysis; bioactive compounds; prebiotic; probiotic; food microbiology and safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. María G. Córdoba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Food Quality and Microbiology, University Institute for the Research in Agrifood Resources-INURA, University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: food safety; food microbiology; toxigenic molds; biocontrol; prevention research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The enhancement of food safety and biosecurity by developing new methods for the analysis of filamentous fungi colonizing foods and new strategies to reduce or eliminate toxin contamination—either plant or animal origin commodities—is of great importance. This ensures the protection of consumers´ health and the avoidance of economic losses to farmers, manufacturers, and retailers. This Special Issue is a continuation of the Special Issue entitled “Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research”, but is more focused on the undesirable effects of molds growing on foods, either through spoilage or through toxin production. From a food safety perspective, the long-time and chronic effects of mycotoxins synthesized by filamentous fungi in foods create a necessity for designing new and effective methods for the detection and prevention of mycotoxins.

This Special Issue of Toxins looks forward to receiving contributions, either research papers or reviews, on the novel and original foodborne filamentous fungi and mycotoxin detection methods, and research relied on searching prevention strategies of different types (chemical, physical or biological). Efficient biological prevention strategies are very welcome. Research aimed at understanding the ecological reasons why fungi grow on determined and specific niches is also well-received.

Dr. Alicia Rodríguez
Prof. Dr. Alberto Martín
Prof. Dr. María G. Córdoba
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Moulds
  • Mycotoxins
  • Detection techniques
  • Prevention strategies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
In Vitro Biological Control of Aspergillus flavus by Hanseniaspora opuntiae L479 and Hanseniaspora uvarum L793, Producers of Antifungal Volatile Organic Compounds
Toxins 2021, 13(9), 663; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13090663 - 17 Sep 2021
Viewed by 273
Abstract
Aspergillus flavus is a toxigenic fungal colonizer of fruits and cereals and may produce one of the most important mycotoxins from a food safety perspective, aflatoxins. Therefore, its growth and mycotoxin production should be effectively avoided to protect consumers’ health. Among the safe [...] Read more.
Aspergillus flavus is a toxigenic fungal colonizer of fruits and cereals and may produce one of the most important mycotoxins from a food safety perspective, aflatoxins. Therefore, its growth and mycotoxin production should be effectively avoided to protect consumers’ health. Among the safe and green antifungal strategies that can be applied in the field, biocontrol is a recent and emerging strategy that needs to be explored. Yeasts are normally good biocontrol candidates to minimize mold-related hazards and their modes of action are numerous, one of them being the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). To this end, the influence of VOCs produced by Hanseniaspora opuntiae L479 and Hanseniaspora uvarum L793 on growth, expression of the regulatory gene of the aflatoxin pathway (aflR) and mycotoxin production by A. flavus for 21 days was assessed. The results showed that both yeasts, despite producing different kinds of VOCs, had a similar effect on inhibiting growth, mycotoxin biosynthetic gene expression and phenotypic toxin production overall at the mid-incubation period when their synthesis was the greatest. Based on the results, both yeast strains, H. opuntiae L479 and H. uvarum L793, are potentially suitable as a biopreservative agents for inhibiting the growth of A. flavus and reducing aflatoxin accumulation. Full article
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