Special Issue "The Effect of Microbial Toxins on Animal Health and Food Safety"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alexander Govaris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Hygiene of Foods of Animal Origin, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly, 224 Trikalon Street, Karditsa 43100, Greece
Interests: antioxidant and antimicrobial effect of essential oils in foods of animal origin; modified air packaging of meat and dairy products; foodborne pathogens in foods of animal origin; omic and foods; oxidation of proteins in foods; lipid oxidation in foods; mycotoxins in foods; evaluation of thermal processing of foods
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Andreana Pexara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Hygiene of Foods of Animal Origin, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly, 43100 Karditsa, Greece
Interests: Foodborne pathogens and public health; Occurrence, behavior, and enterotoxin production by Staphylococcus aureus in foods of animal origin; Effect of modified atmosphere packaging, essential oils, nisin against foodborne pathogens; Occurrence and behavior of mycotoxins in foods of animal origin; Coxiella burnetii in milk

Special Issue Information

There are several toxigenic bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis, Listeria monocytogens, Shigella dysenteriae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium novyi, Clostridium septicum, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani, Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pneumonia, which can infect animals. The toxins of toxigenic bacteria can cause several diseases, such as black leg, malignant edema, enterotoxaemia, sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia, tetanus, mastitis, etc., and even lead to the death of animals (e.g., anthrax or listeriosis). Bacterial toxins can also affect the health of animals and reduce their production activities (e.g., milk). The current epidemiological data, occurrence of bacterial toxigenic strains, antibiotic resistance, treatment of infected animals or prevention measures of toxigenic bacterial infection in animals are interesting scientific items for health scientists and livestock.

Toxigenic foodborne bacteria such as Listeria monocytogens, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Clostridium botulinum or Yersinia enterocolitica can also infect consumers and cause severe outbreaks. Certain toxins such as Botulinum toxin from Clostridium botulinum or Shiga-like toxins from Escherichia coli O157:H7 can also cause the death of consumers.

Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, produced by several fungi species in a wide variety of foods and feeds around the world. Mycotoxins can affect the health and even cause the death of animals or humans. The most important mycotoxins are aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fusarium, patulin, citrinin, and ergot alkaloids. Toxigenic fungi are several Aspergillus, Penicillium, Claviceps, Paecilomyces or Fusarium species. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most potent natural carcinogen known. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B).

The current scientific data on toxigenic foodborne bacteria and mycotoxins are important for the consumers, health scientists, and food safety authorities.

This Special Issue of Toxins entitled “The Effect of Microbial Toxins on Animal Health and Food Safety” invites works (research or reviews) on the current state of knowledge of the subject

Prof. Dr. Alexander Govaris
Dr. Andreana Pexara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacterial toxins
  • toxigenic bacteria
  • mycotoxins
  • toxigenic fungi
  • animal health
  • foodborne bacteria
  • food safety

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Occurrence and Toxicogenetic Profiling of Clostridium perfringens in Buffalo and Cattle: An Update from Pakistan
Toxins 2021, 13(3), 212; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13030212 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 523
Abstract
Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive bacterium that possess seven toxinotypes (A, B, C, D, E, F, and G) that are responsible for the production of six major toxins, i.e., α, β, ε, ι, CPE, and NetB. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive bacterium that possess seven toxinotypes (A, B, C, D, E, F, and G) that are responsible for the production of six major toxins, i.e., α, β, ε, ι, CPE, and NetB. The aim of this study is to find out the occurrence of toxinotypes in buffalo and cattle of Punjab province in Pakistan and their corresponding toxin-encoding genes from the isolated toxinotypes. To accomplish this aim, six districts in Punjab province were selected (i.e., Lahore, Sahiwal, Cheecha Watni, Bhakkar, Dera Ghazi Khan, and Bahawalpur) and a total of 240 buffalo and 240 cattle were selected for the collection of samples. From isolation and molecular analysis (16S rRNA), it was observed that out of seven toxinotypes (A–G), two toxinotypes (A and D) were found at most, whereas other toxinotypes, i.e., B, C, E, F, and G, were not found. The most frequently occurring toxinotype was type A (buffalo: 149/240; cattle: 157/240) whereas type D (buffalo: 8/240 cattle: 7/240) was found to occur the least. Genes encoding toxinotypes A and D were cpa and etx, respectively, whereas genes encoding other toxinotypes were not observed. The occurrence of isolated toxinotypes was studied using response surface methodology, which suggested a considerable occurrence of the isolated toxinotypes (A and D) in both buffalo and cattle. Association between type A and type D was found to be significant among the isolated toxinotypes in both buffalo and cattle (p ≤ 0.05). Correlation was also found to be positive and significant between type A and type D. C. perfringens exhibits a range of toxinotypes that can be diagnosed via genotyping, which is more reliable than classical toxinotyping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Microbial Toxins on Animal Health and Food Safety)
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