Special Issue "Dark Matter and Dark Energy: Particle Physics, Cosmology, and Experimental Searches"

A special issue of Universe (ISSN 2218-1997). This special issue belongs to the section "Cosmology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sunny Vagnozzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Kavli Institute for Cosmology (KICC) and Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK
Interests: cosmology; cosmic microwave background; large-scale structure; dark matter; dark energy; neutrino cosmology; modified gravity; gravitational waves; astroparticle physics; black hole physics
Dr. Eleonora Di Valentino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
Interests: cosmology; cosmic microwave background; large-scale structure; cosmological tensions; dark matter; dark energy; neutrino cosmology; modified gravity; cosmic inflation; gravitational waves
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Alessandro Melchiorri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00815 Rome, Italy
Interests: cosmology; cosmic microwave background; large-scale structure; cosmological tensions; dark matter; dark energy; neutrino cosmology; modified gravity; cosmic inflation; gravitational waves
Prof. Olga Mena
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Física Corpuscolar (IFIC), University of Valencia and CSIC, Parque Cientifico, c/Catedrático José Beltrán 2, E-46980 Paterna, Spain
Interests: cosmology; dark matter; dark energy; neutrino cosmology; modified gravity; astroparticle physics; neutrino oscillations; 21-cm cosmology; cosmic inflation; particle physics
Dr. Luca Visinelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gravitation Astroparticle Physics Amsterdam (GRAPPA), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: cosmology; dark matter; dark energy; astroparticle physics; particle physics; cosmic inflation; axions; gravitational waves; black hole physics; Higgs physics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Thanks to a variety of astrophysical and cosmological observations, it has been established that the energy budget of the Universe is dominated by two dark components, whose origin and composition remain unknown: dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE). One of the major tasks of cosmology, particle physics, and astrophysics in the coming years will be to unravel the nature of DM and DE both through joint and complementary efforts. 

On the particle physics side, DM candidates are ubiquitous in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. However, DM has so far eluded discovery despite significant detection efforts, making it worth thinking of both alternative DM candidates, as well as novel detection methods. Moreover, the predictions of the collisionless cold DM paradigm appear to be in tension with galactic and sub-galactic structure observations (the so-called “small scale crisis”), which might be pointing towards a richer particle DM structure. From the particle physics point of view, the nature of DE is even more uncertain and no leading paradigm exists. 

On the cosmological side, the ΛCDM standard cosmological model has been able to successfully explain a wide variety of observations ranging from cosmic microwave background radiation to the large-scale structure of the Universe. Yet, we know that ΛCDM cannot be the end of the story. Intriguingly, hints of cracks in the ΛCDM model have been appearing in relation to tensions between parameters determined from high- and low-redshift observations, such as the well-known Hubble constant tension. These tensions could be pointing towards a richer dark sector, especially on the DE side (for instance in the form of an early DE component, DM-DE interactions, or phase transitions in the DE). 

Our goal in this Special Issue is to foster discussions to further understand the dark sector, including novel theoretical models, new detection ideas, and reviews on what the dark sector components might or might not be. We believe that a joint and complementary effort between particle physics, cosmology, and astrophysics, is vital to shedding light on the dark side of the Universe, and we, thus, especially encourage works at the interface of model building, phenomenology, and observations. Topics of interest to this Special Issue include (but are most certainly not limited to) the keywords summarized below. We welcome both original submissions and review papers, and look forward to your contributions!

Dr. Sunny Vagnozzi
Dr. Eleonora Di Valentino
Prof. Alessandro Melchiorri
Prof. Olga Mena
Dr. Luca Visinelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Universe is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dark matter
  • Dark energy
  • Current and future cosmological and astrophysical observations
  • Experimental searches for dark matter and dark energy
  • Extensions of ΛCDM and beyond the standard model physics
  • Small-scale structure problems of ΛCDM
  • Cosmological tensions
  • Modified gravity
  • Self-interacting dark matter
  • Interacting dark energy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Directional Observation of Cold Dark Matter Particles (WIMP) in Light Target Experiments
Universe 2021, 7(7), 215; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/universe7070215 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 510
Abstract
For the last 10 years, the search for dark matter (DM) was carried out taking into account the fact that the DM particles are WIMPs (Weakly Interacted Massive Particles) which were introduced in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. Many experiments such as [...] Read more.
For the last 10 years, the search for dark matter (DM) was carried out taking into account the fact that the DM particles are WIMPs (Weakly Interacted Massive Particles) which were introduced in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. Many experiments such as XENON1T, DarkSide, CRESST, etc. set the constraints on the WIMP-nucleon elastic interaction cross sections for different assumed WIMP masses. Methods for detecting WIMPs could play a special role, allowing one to determine the directions of the tracks of recoil nuclei and, therefore, to determine the preferred direction of the WIMP flux. In this work, we analyze the capabilities of such direct detection experiments through analyzing the lengths and directions of the tracks of recoil nuclei. Taking into account the existing experimental constraints, we conclude that the optimal target would be a lower density target containing nuclei of the CNO group, for example, liquid propane. Full article
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Article
A Table-Top Pilot Experiment for Narrow Mass Range Light Cold Dark Matter Particle Searches
Universe 2020, 6(2), 28; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/universe6020028 - 03 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1194
Abstract
This report presents the detection framework and a proposal for a pilot table-top experiment (supported by simulations and preliminary test results) for adoption into narrow mass range light Cold Dark Matter (CDM) searches, specifically for axions or Axion-Like Particles (ALPs) in a resonant [...] Read more.
This report presents the detection framework and a proposal for a pilot table-top experiment (supported by simulations and preliminary test results) for adoption into narrow mass range light Cold Dark Matter (CDM) searches, specifically for axions or Axion-Like Particles (ALPs) in a resonant cavity-based scheme. The novelty of this proposal lies in an attempt to concentrate searches corresponding to specific axion masses of interest (coinciding with recent proposals), using multiple cavities in a symmetric scheme, instead of using noisy and complicated tuning mechanisms, and in reduction of associated hardware by employing simpler underlying instrumentation instead of heterodyne mode of detection, by means of a low-noise ac amplification and dc phase-sensitive detection scheme, in order to make a viable and compact table-top experiment possible. These simplifications could possibly be valuable in substantially reducing detection hardware, experiment complexities (and associated noise) and long run-times, while maintaining low noise similar to conventional axion searches. The feasibility of proposed scheme and the experiment design are demonstrated with some calculations, simulations and preliminary tests with artificial axion signals injected into the cavities. The technique and ideas reported here have significant potential to be developed into a small-scale table-top, narrow-range, dark matter axion/ALP spectroscopy experiment, in addition to aiding in the on-going resonant cavity-based and broadband experiments. Full article
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