Urban Agenda

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2025 | Viewed by 48046

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, University of Valladolid, Campus Duques de Soria, 42004 Soria, Spain
Interests: energy; engineering; computer science; photovoltaic systems; microgrids; distributed generation; smart metering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Economics, University of Valladolid, Campus Duques de Soria, 42004 Soria, Spain
Interests: economy; local development; urban agenda

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Urban Planning & Urban Design, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 114 28 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: tendencies in urbanism; urban transformations; sustainable housing; urban planning and urban design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China
2. Xiamen Key Laboratory of Urban Metabolism, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021, China
3. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 101408, China
Interests: urban science and sustainability; healthy city and public health; suicide and mental health; climate change and environmental management; quantitative methodology and artificial intelligence
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Didactics of Experimental and Social Sciences and Mathematics, Faculty of Education of Soria, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
Interests: ecology; scientific education; environmental education; curricular sustainability; urban agenda 2030
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Urban Agenda is a strategic document, without normative character, and therefore of voluntary adherence. In accordance with the criteria established by the 2030 Agenda, the new United Nations Urban Agenda and the Urban Agenda for the European Union, the Urban Agenda pursues the achievement of sustainability in urban development policies. It also constitutes a working method and a process for all actors, public and private, that intervene in cities and that seek equitable, fair and sustainable development from their different fields of action. It is also considered as a frame of reference for urban areas that establishes a range of urban policies of a social, economic and environmental nature, which can be put into practice by any municipality in the rural or urban environment and by any city, regardless of its location and size, and that concern the entire territory.

In this sense, this Special Issue on the “Urban Agenda” will cover the following research areas:

  • New technologies and developments.
  • Smart cities, smart environment, smart rural.
  • IoT and mobility.
  • Urban planification.
  • Sector coupling.
  • Habits and social behaviors.
  • Humanistic vision of citizens.
  • Governance and citizenship.
  • Social cooperation.
  • Circular economy and new economic challenges.
  • Energy transition and climate change.
  • Environmental impact on air, water and energy.
  • Sustainable mobility.
  • Local, regional, national and international regulations.
  • New educational habits.
  • Sociology of population, territory and migrations.
  • Urban and social regeneration.
  • Neighborhoods and housing.
  • Landscape and coastline.
  • Citizen health and well-being.
  • Other aspects of the Urban Agenda.

This Special Issue is supported by the following association
1: Cátedra Agenda Urbana 2030 para el desarrollo local
2: Ayuntamieno de Soria
3: Soria 2030

Prof. Dr. Luis Hernández-Callejo
Prof. Dr. Sergio Nesmachnow
Prof. Dr. Pablo de Frutos Madrazo
Dr. Tigran Haas
Dr. Yu-Sheng Shen
Prof. Dr. Marcia Eugenio-Gozalbo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cities
  • rural areas
  • sustainability
  • sustainable development goals
  • landscaping
  • urban planning
  • rural planning
  • urban design
  • sustainable energy design
  • citizen health
  • citizenship and governance
  • environmental impact
  • new educational habits
  • smart cities
  • smart rural
  • mobility
  • IoT

Published Papers (18 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

33 pages, 2629 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Sustainable Mobility Initiatives Developed in Montevideo, Uruguay
by Sergio Nesmachnow and Silvina Hipogrosso
Urban Sci. 2024, 8(2), 52; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci8020052 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 589
Abstract
This article presents an assessment of sustainable mobility initiatives developed in Montevideo, Uruguay, in the period from 2020 to 2023. The significance of sustainable mobility is underscored due to its far-reaching implications for the environment, energy efficiency, and the overall quality of life [...] Read more.
This article presents an assessment of sustainable mobility initiatives developed in Montevideo, Uruguay, in the period from 2020 to 2023. The significance of sustainable mobility is underscored due to its far-reaching implications for the environment, energy efficiency, and the overall quality of life of citizens. This study focuses on crucial aspects of four initiatives deployed in Montevideo in 2020–2023: electric mobility solutions using scooters, the development of infrastructure and services for urban cycling, the development of electric public transportation, and private electric transportation. Important results are obtained and commented on for each of the studied initiatives, regarding efficiency, environmental impact, accessibility, the quality of the service, and other relevant indicators. Based on the analysis, valuable knowledge is acquired to guide the future development of efficient and sustainable transportation modes in Montevideo, Uruguay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 7503 KiB  
Article
The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Public Transportation System of Montevideo, Uruguay: A Urban Data Analysis Approach
by Sergio Nesmachnow and Andrei Tchernykh
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(4), 113; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7040113 - 26 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1768
Abstract
Urban mobility and strategies for public transportation play a vital role in promoting a more sustainable, accessible, and livable urban environment in smart cities. Data-driven decision making, multi-modal integration, and innovative means are key elements in developing effective public transportation. The COVID-19 pandemic [...] Read more.
Urban mobility and strategies for public transportation play a vital role in promoting a more sustainable, accessible, and livable urban environment in smart cities. Data-driven decision making, multi-modal integration, and innovative means are key elements in developing effective public transportation. The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on public transportation worldwide, including decreased travel, health and security concerns, and a shift in travel patterns. In particular, the use of public transportation reduced by up to 90% in developed countries. This article studies the mobility demands and patterns related to public transportation in Montevideo, Uruguay, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. The study follows an urban data analysis approach, using open data from various sources, including citizen mobility, the public transportation system, COVID-19 case records, and economic indicators. The urban data methodology allows the deriving of significant findings, encompassing the assessment of trip reductions in Montevideo in March 2020 (71.4%, lower than similar cities in the world), the correlation between trip numbers and COVID-19 cases during the different pandemic waves, the recovery of public transportation usage, and the correlation with socio-economic indicators. These results offer valuable insights for quantifying and comprehending the behavior of citizens concerning public transportation throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, providing valuable understandings for policymakers and researchers to elaborate mobility strategies and policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2863 KiB  
Article
Sociodemographic Analysis of Disability in a Highly Depopulated Rural Region: The Case of Soria, Spain
by Juan R. Coca, Julio Fernández-Portela, Susana Gómez-Redondo and Anabel Paramá-Díaz
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(4), 112; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7040112 - 26 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1566
Abstract
European regions with a lower population density have greater structural difficulties in ensuring that the daily life of their inhabitants matches that of more populated regions. This problem persists in groups of people who present some type of disability. Soria (Spain) is one [...] Read more.
European regions with a lower population density have greater structural difficulties in ensuring that the daily life of their inhabitants matches that of more populated regions. This problem persists in groups of people who present some type of disability. Soria (Spain) is one of such regions. It is considered the most depopulated region of Southern Europe. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the reality of people with disabilities in one of the provinces with a lower population density. It also seeks to explore the relationship between the perceptions and the reality of the existing structure to infer the promotions or limitations of agency. To this end, we conducted a systematic review of the existing literature, a sociogeographic study of the study context, and a mixed investigation. The results show that the greatest problem lies in the cities and towns located far away from the capital city, causing budget cutbacks and, therefore, reducing the attention to the needs of people with disabilities. However, social solidarity has increased, which is perceived as greater social inclusion for this group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3653 KiB  
Article
Biodiesel Production by Transesterification of Recycled Oil Catalyzed with Zinc Oxide Prepared Starting from Used Batteries
by Domenica Seminario-Calle, Melissa Ortega-Maldonado, Verónica Pinos-Vélez, Juan Cisneros, Andrés Montero-Izquierdo, Paulina Echeverría-Paredes, Paola Duque-Sarango and Paúl Álvarez-Lloret
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(3), 80; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7030080 - 31 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1712
Abstract
The consumption of batteries and cooking oil have been increasing. Most used batteries are disposed of incorrectly, leading to health and environmental problems because of their composition. In a similar form, cooking oil, once used, is often released by the discharge reaching the [...] Read more.
The consumption of batteries and cooking oil have been increasing. Most used batteries are disposed of incorrectly, leading to health and environmental problems because of their composition. In a similar form, cooking oil, once used, is often released by the discharge reaching the wastewater, polluting soil, and water, which affects its treatment. In Ecuador, these environmental passives are recollected and stored without further treatment, which is a temporary and unsustainable solution. To address this issue, the circular economy concept has gained increasing attention. In this study, zinc oxide was prepared from discarded batteries using the hydrometallurgical method to use as a catalyst; it achieved 98.49% purity and 56.20% yield and 20.92% of particles presented a particle size of 1–10 nm. Furthermore, the catalyst morphology was investigated in an SEM, which showed that particle size ranged from 155.69 up to 490.15 nm and spherical shapes. Due to its characteristics, the obtained catalyst can be used in the industry instead of the zinc oxide obtained by mining processes. These processes are known to produce heavy contamination in the ecosystems and human health. Additionally, a zinc oxide lifecycle in the environment was analyzed through a material flow analysis (MFA), taking into consideration two paths, one assuming the disposal of used batteries and the other assuming the recycling of zinc. Biodiesel was produced with a heterogeneous catalyst. This took place with a transesterification reaction with used cooking oil, ethanol, and zinc oxide (ZnO) as catalysts. The biodiesel obtained had the following characteristics: 37.55 kJg1 of heating power, 0.892 gcm3 of density, 4.189 mm2/s of viscosity, 0.001% of water content, and a 70.91% yield. Furthermore, the energy consumption in biodiesel production was quantified, giving a total of 37.15 kWh. This kind of initiative prevents that waste from becoming environmental pollutants and potential health risks by giving them a second use as a resource. Moreover, turning waste into a valuable product makes the processes self-sustaining and attractive to be implemented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 3424 KiB  
Article
Socio-Economic Feasibility for Implementation of Environmental Legislation along the Riparian Buffer Zones in Urban Rivers of Northern Tanzania
by Janeth Mwile Mwasenga and Ibrahimu Chikira Mjemah
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(3), 73; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7030073 - 10 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1528
Abstract
The development of socio-economic activities within the 60 m buffer zone has imposed change on the characteristics of rivers in northern Tanzania, subjecting rivers to collateral and irreversible damage due to their prolonged exposure to anthropic activities. Time series satellite images were classified [...] Read more.
The development of socio-economic activities within the 60 m buffer zone has imposed change on the characteristics of rivers in northern Tanzania, subjecting rivers to collateral and irreversible damage due to their prolonged exposure to anthropic activities. Time series satellite images were classified to analyze land use/cover (LULC) changes and anthropic development along the buffer zone from 2000 to 2020. Structured questionnaires were used to identify the encroachment factors and level of compliance with alleged environmental legislation. Furthermore, focus group discussions were used to acquire information on the concurrent barriers to environmental legislation implementation. The land use/cover change along the buffer zone showed that agriculture and artificial areas had a credible increase of about 43% and 30% from 2000 to 2020, respectively. Furthermore, forest and semi-natural areas decreased by 71% from 2000 to 2020, whereas wetlands decreased by about 2% within the same timeframe. On the other hand, artificial and agricultural areas increased by 24.5% and 19.5%, respectively. Forest and semi-natural areas decreased by about 44%, whereas wetlands and water showed a flimsy increase from 2000 to 2020. This trend shows that high land use/cover changes occurred along the riparian buffer zone. The results suggest that urbanization is the main driving force for riparian buffer zone encroachment, threatening ecological well-being and water resource sustainability in urban rivers. The findings of this study are useful for advancing regional and national policies and practices for sustainable water resource management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 6892 KiB  
Article
Pedestrian Flows Characterization and Estimation with Computer Vision Techniques
by Federico Karagulian, Carlo Liberto, Matteo Corazza, Gaetano Valenti, Andreea Dumitru and Marialisa Nigro
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 65; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7020065 - 14 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1836
Abstract
This work describes a straightforward implementation of detecting and tracking pedestrian walking across a public square using computer vision. The methodology consists of the use of the well-known YOLOv3 algorithm over videos recorded during different days of the week. The chosen location was [...] Read more.
This work describes a straightforward implementation of detecting and tracking pedestrian walking across a public square using computer vision. The methodology consists of the use of the well-known YOLOv3 algorithm over videos recorded during different days of the week. The chosen location was the Piazza Duca d’Aosta in the city of Milan, Italy, in front of the main Centrale railway station, an access point for the subway. Several analyses have been carried out to investigate macroscopic parameters of pedestrian dynamics such as densities, speeds, and main directions followed by pedestrians, as well as testing strengths and weaknesses of computer-vision algorithms for pedestrian detection. The developed system was able to represent spatial densities and speeds of pedestrians along temporal profiles. Considering the whole observation period, the mean value of the Voronoi density was about 0.035 person/m2 with a standard deviation of about 0.014 person/m2. On the other hand, two main speed clusters were identified during morning/evening hours. The largest number of pedestrians with an average speed of about 0.77 m/s was observed along the exit direction of the subway entrances during both morning and evening hours. The second relevant group of pedestrians was observed walking in the opposite direction with an average speed of about 0.65 m/s. The analyses generated initial insights into the future development of a decision-support system to help with the management and control of pedestrian dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 1740 KiB  
Article
Urbanization and Land Use Planning for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): A Case Study of Greece
by Dimitrios Kalfas, Stavros Kalogiannidis, Fotios Chatzitheodoridis and Ermelinda Toska
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 43; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7020043 - 24 Apr 2023
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 8625
Abstract
Sustainable development has attracted the attention of social-economic, spatial well-being, and cultural continuity advocates across the world. However, the processes involved in land use as well as urban development have continued to affect the attainment of sustainable development. This study assessed the effects [...] Read more.
Sustainable development has attracted the attention of social-economic, spatial well-being, and cultural continuity advocates across the world. However, the processes involved in land use as well as urban development have continued to affect the attainment of sustainable development. This study assessed the effects of urbanization and land use planning on achieving sustainable development goals. The data were collected using a survey questionnaire from 384 different government leaders in Greece. The study showed that the indicators of urbanization quality have a positive effect on sustainable development goals. It was revealed that there is a significant relationship between integrated land use strategies and sustainable development goals. The study showed that indicators of urbanization quality are very key to achieving different SDGs. This indicates that sustainable urbanization entails more than just converting agricultural land and forests without making any changes to them into cities, and it is equally one of the answers to the problem of the world’s population growth if it is done with vision and dedication. The study clearly shows that integrated land use strategies are important in achieving the SDGs. In this case, land use planning is mostly a local effort, though some nations employ guiding land use plans created at the regional or inter-municipal level. Furthermore, urbanization opportunities and land-use plans have a great influence on the achievement of sustainable development goals. Notably, the goal of sustainable urban development is to make urban areas “sustainable” as well as to build or reinforce the city’s sustainability-related economic, social, cultural, and environmental aspects. It then goes on to discover how to spread that idea and why it is important to be focused, using various definitions. The fundamental idea of sustainable urban development is then realized by reviewing the ideas and principles of sustainable development. Finally, some general recommendations are made regarding urban planning, sustainable urban development, and the significance of establishing the necessary conditions for its realization. Urban sustainability and proper use of land require structural changes as well as significant, fundamental shifts at all societal levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2361 KiB  
Article
Enumerating and Modelling the Seasonal alterations of Surface Urban Heat and Cool Island: A Case Study over Indian Cities
by Vinayak Bhanage, Sneha Kulkarni, Rajat Sharma, Han Soo Lee and Shirishkumar Gedam
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 38; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7020038 - 30 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1955
Abstract
The present study has been carried out to analyze the seasonal variation of the Urban Heat and Cool Island over the nine developing cities of India. The magnitude of urban heat/cool island and vegetation gradient (∆NDVI) were measured from the daytime satellite datasets. [...] Read more.
The present study has been carried out to analyze the seasonal variation of the Urban Heat and Cool Island over the nine developing cities of India. The magnitude of urban heat/cool island and vegetation gradient (∆NDVI) were measured from the daytime satellite datasets. Results of this study show that during the pre-monsoon (March to May) season, the maximum magnitude of the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI) was experienced over Kolhapur city, whereas, in the winter, the highest intensity of SUHI was noticed over Pune city. Subsequently, outcomes also depict that the changes in ∆NDVI restrain the pre-monsoon means and the seasonal alterations in SUHI magnitude. However, during the winter (November to February) season, it is controlled by the temperature–vegetation conditions of the rural areas. For pre-monsoon and seasonal changes in SUHI, with the aid of ∆NDVI and the surface temperature of the urban area, regression equations were fitted for pre-monsoon and seasonal changes in SUHI, which explains nearly 90% of SUHI variation. Similarly, the variation of SUHI has been modeled for winter, which elucidates up to 84% of SUHI discrepancy. The study reveals that, on a seasonal scale, a decrement of 0.1 in seasonal ∆NDVI leads to an increase in the seasonal intensity of SUHI by 1.74 °C, which is quite a significant augmentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 738 KiB  
Article
Developing Effective Project Management Strategy for Urban Flood Disaster Prevention Project in EDO State Capital, Nigeria
by Chima Ibeanu, Mazyar Ghadiri Nejad and Matina Ghasemi
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 37; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7020037 - 30 Mar 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2686
Abstract
Emphasizing the need to provide a coordinated flood management strategy in the country and avoid acting in an isolated way when it occurs, improving the attitude of flood control during floods, and controlling floods with comprehensive analysis are among the main purposes of [...] Read more.
Emphasizing the need to provide a coordinated flood management strategy in the country and avoid acting in an isolated way when it occurs, improving the attitude of flood control during floods, and controlling floods with comprehensive analysis are among the main purposes of the current study. In this study, the environment’s physical, technological, social, economic, and political characteristics are considered to assess the urban flood risk. This study entails a discussion of flood hazard control in Benin City, the capital city of Edo State of Nigeria. The research methodology involves employing both interviews and questionnaire distribution. First, three key persons involved in flood control are interviewed at the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA), which coordinates disaster risk reduction in the state, and then, the responses are classified into themes that are used to prepare the questionnaire to be distributed in four main regions. The questionnaires are distributed to the employees in institutions concerned with flood control and to the general population living in the region. Based on the obtained results from the interviews, some methods that could be applicable in controlling flooding in the region are listed. The results showed that the most important ones are flood warning systems, flood prevention through using the building resilient infrastructure and community programs, protection and mitigation through using natural processes, and strategic implementation of a flood emergency plan through sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2462 KiB  
Article
Defining the Organization of Municipal Solid Waste Management Based on Production Costs
by Massimo Beccarello and Giacomo Di Foggia
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 34; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7020034 - 28 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1681
Abstract
A long-lasting dilemma on the efficient provision of services of general economic interest has become increasingly important in the waste management industry: competition or monopoly in municipal solid waste management. Previous literature has primarily examined the economics of scale and scope to provide [...] Read more.
A long-lasting dilemma on the efficient provision of services of general economic interest has become increasingly important in the waste management industry: competition or monopoly in municipal solid waste management. Previous literature has primarily examined the economics of scale and scope to provide an adequate response. Here, we contribute by investigating subadditivity in municipal solid waste management service costs. Subadditivity is a critical concept used to justify imperfect competition, which encourages natural monopolies where one producer will function more effectively than more firms. To test the hypothesis that a subadditivity in costs in waste management exists, we design a simulation based on empirical data for Milan, Italy. We compared the total production cost of the incumbent firm with the alternative hypothesis built by dividing the city into four areas and assigning each area to a different hypothetical firm. The results suggest that the existence of subadditivity results in 6% lower production costs, primarily stemming from business synergies, lower transactional costs, and optimization of productive resources and facilities. The evidence justifies, ceteris paribus, that the provision by a single firm is preferable to multiple firms in the analysis case. Implications for policies are straightforward. The one-fit rule approach fails to set the best condition for policymakers to create a level playing field transparently and efficiently for industry operators to perform efficiently. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 6234 KiB  
Article
Impact of Tourist Areas on the Electrical Grid: A Case Study of the Southern Dominican Republic
by Miguel Aybar-Mejía, Randy Andrés, Alam Cabral-Soto, Carlos Montás, Wilmer-Johann Núñez-García, Elvin Arnaldo Jiménez Matos, Giuseppe Sbriz-Zeitun and Deyslen Mariano-Hernández
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(1), 32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7010032 - 13 Mar 2023
Viewed by 2139
Abstract
The growing integration of tourist areas and complexes increases the demand for electrical power systems. This increased demand may represent a vulnerability to voltage and frequency stability in electrical grids, where these parameters are essential for an optimal and continuous supply of electrical [...] Read more.
The growing integration of tourist areas and complexes increases the demand for electrical power systems. This increased demand may represent a vulnerability to voltage and frequency stability in electrical grids, where these parameters are essential for an optimal and continuous supply of electrical energy. The Dominican Republic has begun a tourist expansion process in areas that were previously not commercially exploited. Based on the factors mentioned above, this article’s objective was to analyze the impact caused by the increase in electricity demand due to the tourism sector, using the Enriquillo Region of the Dominican Republic as a case study. The impacts of this expansion on the voltage profiles and the system’s frequency were determined. The methodology consisted of obtaining information on the mathematical model of the system to evaluate the expansion plan for the study period and the projection of the demand of the grid. The complete system was modeled with this information, including expansion and possible renewable generators. Finally, the flow of charges was measured, and dynamic analysis was carried out. The quasi-dynamic and RMS/EMT simulations were carried out in the DIgSILENT software for this investigation. The results showed that the electrical system benefits stability and national standards. This is because the transmission lines reduced their loading by approximately 2.99% in 2032. As the years of study passed and the system load increased, the voltage in the bars of the 138 kV systems and generators did not exceed the range of ±5% established in the technical regulations of the Dominican electricity market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 4972 KiB  
Article
An Urban Density-Based Runoff Simulation Framework to Envisage Flood Resilience of Cities
by Naduni Wijayawardana, Chethika Abenayake, Amila Jayasinghe and Nuwan Dias
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(1), 17; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7010017 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2240
Abstract
Assessing the influence of urban density on surface runoff volume is vital for guiding the built-form expansions toward flood-resilient cities. This paper attempts to develop a spatial simulation framework to assess the impact of urban density on the level of surface runoff (SR), [...] Read more.
Assessing the influence of urban density on surface runoff volume is vital for guiding the built-form expansions toward flood-resilient cities. This paper attempts to develop a spatial simulation framework to assess the impact of urban density on the level of surface runoff (SR), at the scale of the micro-watershed. This paper proposes a spatial simulation framework that comprehensively captures the influence of urban density dynamics over surface runoff. The simulation model consists of 13 proxies of urban density that are identified through a systematic literature review. The model is formulated through three case applications in Colombo, Sri Lanka; and validated statistically and empirically with reference to flooding events that occurred in 2021–2022. The possible planning interventions for reducing urban flooding are analyzed through an AI-based application of Decision Tree Analysis. The model results indicated that impervious coverage, open space ratio, and road density have the most significant impact on surface runoff volumes in selected micro-watersheds. The decision-making process for planning the built environment for reducing urban flooding is demonstrated by three possible density control options with a prediction accuracy of 98.7%, 94.8%, and 93.5% respectively. This contributes a novel framework to capture the density dynamics of built form in surface runoff simulations by three density areas (3Ds): density, diversity, and design; and to demonstrate the decision-making process for controlling the density of built form in reducing urban flooding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2959 KiB  
Article
Mental Models for Assessing Impacts of Stormwater on Urban Social–Ecological Systems
by Caitlyn B. O’Connor and Phillip S. Levin
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(1), 14; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7010014 - 30 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1965
Abstract
Managing social–ecological systems that benefit both humans and nature is the central challenge of natural resource management. Integrating multiple perspectives into decision-making adds flexibility to social–ecological systems by reducing rigidity and promoting adaptability. Our objective was to assess expert perceptions of the structure, [...] Read more.
Managing social–ecological systems that benefit both humans and nature is the central challenge of natural resource management. Integrating multiple perspectives into decision-making adds flexibility to social–ecological systems by reducing rigidity and promoting adaptability. Our objective was to assess expert perceptions of the structure, content, and function of the Puget Sound stormwater social–ecological system. We interviewed Puget Sound stormwater experts to document their mental models of the system and compared the network structure of expert maps. We also assessed differences among experts in the components of the social–ecological system which were included in mental models. Our analyses revealed differences between genders, as well as between managers, in how experts characterized the system. Notably, female participants tended to characterize the social–ecological system as one in which there were many system drivers generating multiple impacts across the system. The mental models of the scientists tended to include more resource units than those of the managers, which focused more on governance compared to those of the scientists. Finally, we incorporated the diverse input from mangers and scientists to create a single mental model to represent a consensus on the Puget Sound stormwater social–ecological system. This work highlights the fact that addressing the stormwater problem requires that we embrace the varied perspectives of scientists, managers, and stakeholders. We contend that incorporating the diverse perspectives of experts within the context of social–ecological systems provides a promising path towards a lasting and durable recovery for the ecosystem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4351 KiB  
Article
An Analysis of Urban Ethnic Inclusion of Master Plans—In the Case of Kabul City, Afghanistan
by Fakhrullah Sarwari and Hiroko Ono
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(1), 3; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7010003 - 25 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3541
Abstract
This study examines the history of master planning in Kabul city and how the government approaches segregation through urban planning. There are five master plans made for Kabul city, starting in 1964, with the others being conceived in 1970, 1978, 2011, and 2018. [...] Read more.
This study examines the history of master planning in Kabul city and how the government approaches segregation through urban planning. There are five master plans made for Kabul city, starting in 1964, with the others being conceived in 1970, 1978, 2011, and 2018. The civil war exacerbated the ethnic segmentation in Kabul city. The city is ethnically divided mainly among the different ethnicities of Pashtun, Tajik, and Hazara, which live in three different zones. The urban planning literature and master plans for Kabul city are surveyed, starting from the 1960s with the first master plan to the 2018 Kabul urban design framework. The first three master plans were designed on technical rather than communitive rationalities, with authoritarian planning. However, the fourth master plan of 2011 was developed through engagement with citizens and addressed the ethnic segregation in the city in abstract ways. The fifth masterplan, Kabul urban design framework, was a step backward in participatory planning; it also ignored the ethnic segmentation in the city by unequally distributing the future economic zones, administrative and facilities hubs. The past master plans have ignored the ethnic segregation of the city; there is no detailed plan on how the city will approach segregation through urban planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

30 pages, 14967 KiB  
Article
Geographically Weighted Regression-Based Predictions of Water–Soil–Energy Nexus Solutions in Île-de-France
by Walid Al-Shaar, Olivier Bonin, Bernard de Gouvello, Patrice Chatellier and Martin Hendel
Urban Sci. 2022, 6(4), 81; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci6040081 - 9 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2366
Abstract
Due to global urbanization, urban areas are encountering many environmental, social, and economic challenges. Different solutions have been proposed and implemented, such as nature-based solutions and green and blue infrastructure. Taking into consideration exogenous factors that are associated with these solutions is a [...] Read more.
Due to global urbanization, urban areas are encountering many environmental, social, and economic challenges. Different solutions have been proposed and implemented, such as nature-based solutions and green and blue infrastructure. Taking into consideration exogenous factors that are associated with these solutions is a crucial question to assess their possible effects. This study examines the possible explanatory factors and their evolution until the year 2054 of several solutions in the Île-de-France region: wastewater heat-recovery, surface geothermal energy, and heat-mitigation capacities of zones. This investigation is performed by a series of statistical models, namely the ordinary least squares (OLS) and the geographically weighted regressions (GWR), integrated within a geographic information system. The main driving factors were identified as land use/land cover and population distribution. The results show that GWR models capture a large part of spatial autocorrelation. Apropos of prediction results, areas with low, medium, and high potential for implementing specific solutions are determined. Furthermore, the implementation capacities of solutions are compared with the demand depicted as the need for slowing down the effects of surface urban heat islands and the dependence on fossil energy. Moreover, the heat mitigation capacities are not at all times distinctively linked to human activities. Further investigations are needed to discover the remaining possible reasons, particularly air quality, water, vegetation, and climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1163 KiB  
Article
A Partial Least Squares Analysis of the Perceived Impact of Sustainable Real Estate Design upon Wellbeing
by Anna Cortesi, Ioannis Vardopoulos and Luca Salvati
Urban Sci. 2022, 6(4), 69; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci6040069 - 6 Oct 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2677
Abstract
Improving communities and the urban built environment to promote good health, wellness, and wellbeing has become a top priority globally. This growing trend, evident also in the Sustainable Development Goals’ urgent call for action, has a significant influence on the real estate sustainable [...] Read more.
Improving communities and the urban built environment to promote good health, wellness, and wellbeing has become a top priority globally. This growing trend, evident also in the Sustainable Development Goals’ urgent call for action, has a significant influence on the real estate sustainable development process, which is mostly expressed through design, and is understood as a key value creator in the real estate sector, for all dimensions of the build environment. In order to shed further light on this complex matter, with reference to the perceived impact of sustainable real estate design upon wellbeing, cross-sectional data collected through a survey (n = 150, RR = 75%) were used. The results, obtained from descriptive statistics, regression analysis, variables correlation, and partial least squares-structural equation modeling analysis that incorporated the assessment of measurement and structural models, suggest a positive correlation among the design elements and health, wellness, and wellbeing aspects. The findings are considered significant in terms of filling the gap in the currently published scholarly literature, further supporting the importance of interdisciplinary urban sustainability among real estate professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

24 pages, 2347 KiB  
Review
A Bibliometric and Content Analysis of Sustainability and Smart Tourism
by Clara Madeira, Paula Rodrigues and Monica Gomez-Suarez
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 33; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7020033 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2730
Abstract
Sustainability and smart tourism are current hot topics in academic research. While these two concepts are complementary, their relationship has not been clearly outlined in the scientific literature. This bibliometric analysis aims to address this gap by examining the literature on sustainability and [...] Read more.
Sustainability and smart tourism are current hot topics in academic research. While these two concepts are complementary, their relationship has not been clearly outlined in the scientific literature. This bibliometric analysis aims to address this gap by examining the literature on sustainability and smart tourism. Specifically, this review has five objectives: (i) to document the size and growth of the literature on this topic, (ii) to identify the key authors, journals, and documents, (iii) to categorize the countries with the highest productivity rates, (iv) to highlight emerging topics and their relationship to the conceptual structure of each domain, and (v) to analyse the methodology approach. A total of 104 scientific documents were searched and analysed from the Web of Science Core Collection for the period 1900–2022 using R-Program and VOSviewer. The results indicate that there is an emerging knowledge base with main clusters identified in smart tourism, sustainable tourism, innovation, and smart cities. China, Spain, the Republic of Korea, Italy, Iran, and Portugal have demonstrated the highest rate of scientific production. This review provides valuable insights for both academics and practitioners seeking to expand their knowledge of sustainability and smart tourism research. It also offers new perspectives on the future development of these areas within the social sciences’ academic literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

10 pages, 267 KiB  
Opinion
Towards a New Urban Health Science
by Franz W Gatzweiler, Saroj Jayasinghe, José G Siri and Jason Corburn
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(1), 30; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci7010030 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3329
Abstract
The intensity and range of health challenges that people in cities are facing has increased in recent years. This is due in part to a failure to adequately adapt and respond to emergent and expanding global systemic risks, but also to a still-limited [...] Read more.
The intensity and range of health challenges that people in cities are facing has increased in recent years. This is due in part to a failure to adequately adapt and respond to emergent and expanding global systemic risks, but also to a still-limited understanding of the profound impacts of complexity on urban health. While complexity science is increasingly embraced by the health and urban sciences, it has yet to be functionally incorporated into urban health research, policy, and practice. Accelerating urbanization in a context of escalating environmental constraints will require deeper engagement with complexity, yet also, paradoxically, much swifter, more effective, and more risk-averse decision-making. Meeting these demands will require adopting a science, policy and practice style which is integrative, inclusive, collaborative, systemic, fast, and frugal. We propose transformational shifts in scientific methodology, epistemological and ontological stances, types of rationality, and governance to shift researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and citizens towards a new, complexity-informed science of urban health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agenda)
Back to TopTop