Special Issue "The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rubén Camilo Lois González
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago, Spain
Interests: urban studies; urban planning; spatial planning; city planning; regional studies
Prof. Dr. Luis Alfonso Escudero Gómez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Faculty of Humanities of Toledo, Plaza de Padilla 4, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: urban studies; urban planning; spatial planning; city planning; sustainability
Dr. Daniel Barreiro Quintáns
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Group Territorial Analysis (ANTE), Department of Geography, University of Santiago de Compostela, Pza. Universidade 1, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: urban studies; urban planning; spatial planning; small and medium-sized towns

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of urban spaces has a great tradition in geography and other social sciences, but current trends in the field make it necessary to research cities: first, because, in this 21st century, most of the world’s population live in urban spaces; second, current urban processes are complex and geographically contrasted. While the developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa continue to experience a strong urbanization process, in China, a new urban country has already been fully consolidated, with the largest population in cities in the world, and in North America, there are many cities that are currently experiencing degrowth processes. At the same time, in the Old Continent, urban dynamics vary between processes in central cities, including gentrification and urban sprawl. On a global scale, the territorial and social inequalities of these processes are constantly denounced from concepts such as the right to the city, urban justice and sustainability.

In this context, we consider urban planning as the key tool to fight against the predatory and socially unjust neoliberal urbanization. The objective of this Special Issue is to carry out an urban geography in the 21st century and, in a special way, to advance in city planning proposals.

This Special Issue aims to study the main processes that the city is undergoing in recent  decades and the responses to these new realities from different areas that may include the following:

  • urban design;
  • economy, industry and planning;
  • city planning;
  • politics, social change and urban design;
  • cities in transformation;
  • transportation and urban design;
  • equality, inequality and urban design;
  • civic participation and governance;
  • waters and resources management;
  • social policy and urban design;
  • planning history;
  • complex urban systems and processes of cities’ transformations;
  • polycentrism, small and medium size cities;
  • shrinking and aging cities;
  • urban heritage and conservation.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Rubén Camilo Lois González
Prof. Dr. Luis Alfonso Escudero Gómez
Dr. Daniel Barreiro Quintáns
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban geography
  • urban spaces
  • urban processes
  • urban dynamics
  • urban planning
  • city planning
  • right to the city
  • urban justice
  • sustainability

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Relationships between Density and per Capita Municipal Spending in the United States
Urban Sci. 2021, 5(3), 69; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/urbansci5030069 - 15 Sep 2021
Viewed by 389
Abstract
The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between land use, particularly density, and per capita spending levels in cities across the United States. A model was developed using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of State and Local [...] Read more.
The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between land use, particularly density, and per capita spending levels in cities across the United States. A model was developed using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of State and Local Government Finances to estimate the impacts of population-weighted density and other factors on per capita municipal spending. This study focused on municipal spending for eight categories that theoretically could be influenced by land use development: fire protection, streets and highways, libraries, parks and recreation, police, sewer, solid waste management, and water. Density was found to be negatively associated with per capita municipal expenditures for the following cost categories: operational costs for fire protection, streets and highways, parks and recreation, sewer, solid waste management, and water; construction costs for streets and highways, parks and recreation, sewer, and water; and land and existing facility costs for police, sewer, and water. Results were insignificant for other cost categories, and a positive relationship was found for police operations costs. In general, results support the conclusion that increased density is associated with reduced per capita municipal spending for several cost categories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)
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