Special Issue "Arbovirus Vaccines That Circulate within the Same Ecological Niche: Zika, Dengue & Chikungunya"

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Therapeutic Vaccines and Antibody Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Martin F Bachmann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
RIA, Immunology, University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland
Interests: virus-like particles; vaccines; therapeutic vaccines; vaccines for companion animals; immune responses; memory
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Byron Martina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Viroscience, Postgraduate School Molecular Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Wytemaweg 80, 3015 CN Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: viral pathogenesis; vaccine development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Arthropod-borne viruses, also named arboviruses, are distributed worldwide and represent a global health burden. Arboviruses have a broad distribution within warmer regions of the world, and many of these viruses are found in the same environment and are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by the same vector, for example, the Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya viruses are all transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes.

In addition to transmission by the same vector, arboviruses share a considerable genetic similarity, as well as clinical manifestations, making their diagnostic and treatment more complex. Hence, prophylactic tools, such as vaccine development, and vector control appear to be the best way to control their presence and prevent their spread to a new environment.

Prof. Martin F Bachmann
Dr. Byron Martina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Arboviruses prevention
  • vaccines
  • Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya viruses

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Yellow Fever Virus Genotyping Tool and Investigation of Suspected Adverse Events Following Yellow Fever Vaccination
Vaccines 2019, 7(4), 206; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines7040206 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1332
Abstract
The yellow fever (YF) vaccine consists of an attenuated virus, and despite its relative safety, some adverse events following YF vaccination have been described. At the end of 2016, Brazil experienced the most massive sylvatic yellow fever outbreak over the last 70 years [...] Read more.
The yellow fever (YF) vaccine consists of an attenuated virus, and despite its relative safety, some adverse events following YF vaccination have been described. At the end of 2016, Brazil experienced the most massive sylvatic yellow fever outbreak over the last 70 years and an intense campaign of YF vaccination occurred in Minas Gerais state in Southeast Brazil from 2016 to 2018. The present study aimed to develop a genotyping tool and investigate 21 cases of suspected adverse events following YF vaccination. Initial in silico analyses were performed using partial NS5 nucleotide sequences to verify the discriminatory potential between wild-type and vaccine viruses. Samples from patients were screened for the presence of the YFV RNA, using 5′UTR as the target, and then used for amplification of partial NS5 gene amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Genotyping indicated that 17 suspected cases were infected by the wild-type yellow fever virus, but four cases remained inconclusive. The genotyping tool was efficient in distinguishing the vaccine from wild-type virus, and it has the potential to be used for the differentiation of all yellow fever virus genotypes. Full article
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Article
Zika Virus-Derived E-DIII Protein Displayed on Immunologically Optimized VLPs Induces Neutralizing Antibodies without Causing Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection
Vaccines 2019, 7(3), 72; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines7030072 - 23 Jul 2019
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2486 | Correction
Abstract
Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus similar to Dengue virus (DENV) in terms of transmission and clinical manifestations, and usually both viruses are found to co-circulate. ZIKV is usually transmitted by mosquitoes bites, but may also be transmitted by blood transfusion, via the [...] Read more.
Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus similar to Dengue virus (DENV) in terms of transmission and clinical manifestations, and usually both viruses are found to co-circulate. ZIKV is usually transmitted by mosquitoes bites, but may also be transmitted by blood transfusion, via the maternal–foetal route, and sexually. After 2015, when the most extensive outbreak of ZIKV had occurred in Brazil and subsequently spread throughout the rest of South America, it became evident that ZIKV infection during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with microcephaly and other neurological complications in newborns. As a result, the development of a vaccine against ZIKV became an urgent goal. A major issue with DENV vaccines, and therefore likely also with ZIKV vaccines, is the induction of antibodies that fail to neutralize the virus properly and cause antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of the infection instead. It has previously been shown that antibodies against the third domain of the envelope protein (EDIII) induces optimally neutralizing antibodies with no evidence for ADE for other viral strains. Therefore, we generated a ZIKV vaccine based on the EDIII domain displayed on the immunologically optimized Cucumber mosaic virus (CuMVtt) derived virus-like particles (VLPs) formulated in dioleoyl phosphatidylserine (DOPS) as adjuvant. The vaccine induced high levels of specific IgG after a single injection. The antibodies were able to neutralise ZIKV without enhancing infection by DENV in vitro. Thus, the here described vaccine based on EDIII displayed on VLPs was able to stimulate production of antibodies specifically neutralizing ZIKV without potentially enhancing disease caused by DENV. Full article
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Review

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Review
Considering Genomic and Immunological Correlates of Protection for a Dengue Intervention
Vaccines 2019, 7(4), 203; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines7040203 - 03 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1502
Abstract
Over three billion are at risk of dengue infection with more than 100 million a year presenting with symptoms that can lead to deadly haemorrhagic disease. There are however no treatments available and the only licensed vaccine shows limited efficacy and is able [...] Read more.
Over three billion are at risk of dengue infection with more than 100 million a year presenting with symptoms that can lead to deadly haemorrhagic disease. There are however no treatments available and the only licensed vaccine shows limited efficacy and is able to enhance the disease in some cases. These failures have mainly been due to the complex pathology and lack of understanding of the correlates of protection for dengue virus (DENV) infection. With increasing data suggesting both a protective and detrimental effect for antibodies and CD8 T-cells whilst having complex environmental dynamics. This review discusses the roles of genomic and immunological aspects of DENV infection, providing both a historical interpretation and fresh discussion on how this information can be used for the next generation of dengue interventions. Full article
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Other

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Correction
Correction: Zika Virus-Derived E-DIII Protein Displayed on Immunologically Optimized VLPs Induces Neutralizing Antibodies without Causing Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection. Vaccines 2019, 7, 72
Vaccines 2020, 8(1), 94; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines8010094 - 20 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 937
Abstract
The authors wish to make the following correction to their paper [...] Full article
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