Special Issue "Feature Papers Collection on Influenza Vaccines"

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luis Martinez-Sobrido
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA
Interests: virology; vaccines; antivirals; influenza viruses; arenaviruses; Zika virus; coronavirus; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; innate immunity; adaptive immunity; interferon; virus-host interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ralph A. Tripp
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia Athens, GA 30602-7387, USA
Interests: RNA viruses; respiratory viruses; epithelial cells; siRNA; CRISPR-Cas; host genes; innate immunity; adaptive immunity; anti-viral immunity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Aitor Nogales
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Center for Animal Health Research (CISA-INIA), Valdeolmos, 28130 Madrid, Spain
Interests: influenza; vaccines; viruses; virus-host interaction; innate immunity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on influenza vaccines has focused on methods to provide robust and long-lasting protection. Importantly, different methodologies and approaches to create universal influenza vaccines are currently being explored by different research groups. This Special Issue on “Influenza Vaccines” will cover aspects of the broad area of influenza vaccinology, including traditional and new approaches for influenza vaccine development, including universal influenza vaccine development; new and improved vaccine adjuvants; induction of innate adaptive B and T cell immune responses; virus–host interactions; mechanisms of viral virulence; correlation of influenza vaccine protection; cross-reactive and broadly neutralizing approaches, including therapeutic antibody treatment, animal modeling and reservoirs, and surveillance and transmission; and development of novel influenza vaccines, vaccine vectors, and expression approaches and substrates for vaccine development, production, and manufacturing. Importantly, this Special Issue will also aim to examine the efforts that need to be made by vaccine production and manufacturing companies and government agencies for the rapid testing and approval of new vaccine methodologies for the control of influenza infections. We anticipate a collection of novel research manuscripts and review articles in this Special Issue which will provide investigators with the latest and newest discoveries in the development and implementation of disease intervention strategies and universal treatment and control of influenza.

Dr. Luis Martinez-Sobrido
Prof. Dr. Ralph A. Tripp
Dr. Aitor Nogales

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Impact of Influenza Vaccination on Mortality in the Oldest Old: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study
Vaccines 2020, 8(3), 356; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines8030356 - 03 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 895
Abstract
Influenza remains a major cause of illness and death in geriatric populations. While the influenza vaccine has successfully reduced morbidity and mortality, its effectiveness is suspected to decrease with age. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of influenza vaccination [...] Read more.
Influenza remains a major cause of illness and death in geriatric populations. While the influenza vaccine has successfully reduced morbidity and mortality, its effectiveness is suspected to decrease with age. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of influenza vaccination on all-cause mortality in very old ambulatory subjects. We conducted a prospective cohort study from 1 July 2016 to 31 June 2017 in a large unselected ambulatory population aged over 80 years. We compared all-cause mortality in vaccinated versus unvaccinated subjects after propensity-score matching, to control for age, sex and comorbidities. Among the 9149 patients included, with mean age 86 years, 4380 (47.9%) were vaccinated against influenza. In total, 5253 (57.4%) had at least one chronic disease. The most commonly vaccinated patients were those with chronic respiratory failure (76.3%) and the least commonly vaccinated were those suffering from Parkinson’s disease (28.5%). Overall, 2084 patients (22.8%) died during the study. After propensity score matching, the mortality was evaluated at 20.9% in the vaccinated group and 23.9% in the unvaccinated group (OR = 0.84 [0.75–0.93], p = 0.001). This decrease in mortality in the vaccinated group persisted whatever the age and Charlson Comorbidity index. In conclusion, nearly a half of this ambulatory elderly population received Influenza vaccine. After adjustment on comorbidities, influenza vaccination was associated with a significant decrease in all-cause mortality, even in the eldest multimorbid population. Improving immunization coverage in this frail older population is urgently needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers Collection on Influenza Vaccines)
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Article
Effect of Influenza Vaccination on Mortality and Risk of Hospitalization in Elderly Individuals with and without Disabilities: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study
Vaccines 2020, 8(1), 112; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines8010112 - 02 Mar 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1035
Abstract
Purpose: The effects of influenza vaccines are unclear for elderly individuals with disabilities. We use a population-based cohort study to estimate the effects of influenza vaccines in elderly individuals with and without disabilities. Methods: Data were taken from the National Health [...] Read more.
Purpose: The effects of influenza vaccines are unclear for elderly individuals with disabilities. We use a population-based cohort study to estimate the effects of influenza vaccines in elderly individuals with and without disabilities. Methods: Data were taken from the National Health Insurance Research Database and Disabled Population Profile of Taiwan. A total of 2,741,403 adults aged 65 or older were identified and 394,490 were people with a disability. These two groups were further divided into those who had or had not received an influenza vaccine. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to compare the relative risks (RRs) of death and hospitalization across the four groups. Results: 30.78% elderly individuals without a disability and 34.59% elderly individuals with a disability had vaccinated for influenza. Compared to the unvaccinated elderly without a disability, the vaccinated elderly without a disability had significantly lower risks in all-cause mortality (RR = 0.64) and hospitalization for any of the influenza-related diseases (RR = 0.91). Both the unvaccinated and vaccinated elderly with a disability had significantly higher risks in all-cause mortality (RR = 1.81 and 1.18, respectively) and hospitalization for any of the influenza-related diseases (RR = 1.73 and 1.59, respectively). Conclusions: The elderly with a disability had higher risks in mortality and hospitalization than those without a disability; however, receiving influenza vaccinations could still generate more protection to the disabled elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers Collection on Influenza Vaccines)
Article
Food Additives as Novel Influenza Vaccine Adjuvants
Vaccines 2019, 7(4), 127; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines7040127 - 24 Sep 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1461
Abstract
Influenza is a major threat to public health. Vaccination is an effective strategy to control influenza; however, the current inactivated influenza vaccine has mild immunogenicity and exhibits suboptimal efficacy in clinical use. Vaccine efficacy can be improved by the addition of adjuvants, but [...] Read more.
Influenza is a major threat to public health. Vaccination is an effective strategy to control influenza; however, the current inactivated influenza vaccine has mild immunogenicity and exhibits suboptimal efficacy in clinical use. Vaccine efficacy can be improved by the addition of adjuvants, but few adjuvants have been approved for human use. To explore novel and effective adjuvants for influenza vaccines, here we screened 145 compounds from food additives approved in Japan. Of these 145 candidates, we identified 41 compounds that enhanced the efficacy of the split influenza hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine against lethal virus challenge in a mouse model. These 41 compounds included 18 novel adjuvant candidates and 15 compounds with previously reported adjuvant effects for other antigens but not for the influenza vaccine. Our results are of value to the development of novel and effective adjuvanted influenza or other vaccines for human use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers Collection on Influenza Vaccines)
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