Special Issue "Recent Advances in Rumen Microbiome"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mi Zhou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada
Interests: rumen microbiome; gut microbiome; microbial bioinformatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of rumen microbiome on influencing host animal growth and health has continuously been one of the hot topics in animal research. Thorough understanding of the composition and function of rumen microbiome is essential for elaborating their impacts and association with host phenotypes. In addition, the environmental impact of rumen microbiome also attracts attention, and there is an urgent need to limit the environmental footprint from animal industry. In this Special Issue, we intend to cover the latest findings regarding the rumen microbiome and provide novel knowledge of this research area.  

We invite original research papers with related topics include

  • rumen microbial composition;
  • rumen microbial function;
  • host-microbial interactions;
  • health implications of rumen microbiome;
  • environmental impact of rumen microbiome.

Dr. Mi Zhou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rumen microbiome
  • recent advances
  • amplicon sequencing
  • metagenome
  • metatranscriptome
  • enteric greenhouse gas emissions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Accessing Dietary Effects on the Rumen Microbiome: Different Sequencing Methods Tell Different Stories
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(7), 138; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vetsci8070138 - 19 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1450
Abstract
The current study employed both amplicon and shotgun sequencing to examine and compare the rumen microbiome in Angus bulls fed with either a backgrounding diet (BCK) or finishing diet (HG), to assess if both methods produce comparable results. Rumen digesta samples from 16 [...] Read more.
The current study employed both amplicon and shotgun sequencing to examine and compare the rumen microbiome in Angus bulls fed with either a backgrounding diet (BCK) or finishing diet (HG), to assess if both methods produce comparable results. Rumen digesta samples from 16 bulls were subjected for microbial profiling. Distinctive microbial profiles were revealed by the two methods, indicating that choice of sequencing approach may be a critical facet in studies of the rumen microbiome. Shotgun-sequencing identified the presence of 303 bacterial genera and 171 archaeal species, several of which exhibited differential abundance. Amplicon-sequencing identified 48 bacterial genera, 4 archaeal species, and 9 protozoal species. Among them, 20 bacterial genera and 5 protozoal species were differentially abundant between the two diets. Overall, amplicon-sequencing showed a more drastic diet-derived effect on the ruminal microbial profile compared to shotgun-sequencing. While both methods detected dietary differences at various taxonomic levels, few consistent patterns were evident. Opposite results were seen for the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and the genus Selenomonas. This study showcases the importance of sequencing platform choice and suggests a need for integrative methods that allow robust comparisons of microbial data drawn from various omic approaches, allowing for comprehensive comparisons across studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Rumen Microbiome)
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