Special Issue "Human Response to Vibration"

A special issue of Vibration (ISSN 2571-631X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Marco Tarabini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano MI, Italy
Interests: whole-body vibration; hand-arm vibration; foot-transmitted vibration; biomechanical response; human vibration modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In modern industrial environments, workers are still exposed to vibrations generated by machines, vehicles, tools, and heavy equipment. The detrimental effects of vibration on the human body have been largely documented in the scientific literature, but, to date, there are no studies outlining an accurate exposure–disorder relationship. The main reason is the complex nature of the human body: The effects of vibration not only vary from subject to subject, but also from the worker posture, habits, professional history, and environmental conditions.

This Special Issue will exchange knowledge about the effect of vibration on humans and increasing the understanding of the mechanisms of injury. We encourage the submission of both literature review articles and novel contributions in the field of assessment, modeling, reduction, and epidemiology of human vibration and shocks. Hopefully, papers will contribute to the identification of new standards for the assessment of risks related to exposure to vibration.

Prof. Dr. Marco Tarabini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vibration is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • whole-body vibration
  • hand-arm vibration
  • foot-transmitted vibration
  • biomechanical response
  • vehicle vibration

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
An Investigation of the Effects of Drill Operator Posture on Vibration Exposure and Temporary Threshold Shift of Vibrotactile Perception Threshold
Vibration 2021, 4(2), 395-405; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration4020025 - 03 May 2021
Viewed by 760
Abstract
The present study involved performing an experiment to clarify whether vibration measurement values on the tool handle, in accordance with ISO 5349-1, can assess risk from workplace environments. The study investigated the relationship between the vibration magnitude of a hand-held electric drill with [...] Read more.
The present study involved performing an experiment to clarify whether vibration measurement values on the tool handle, in accordance with ISO 5349-1, can assess risk from workplace environments. The study investigated the relationship between the vibration magnitude of a hand-held electric drill with different operating postures. The experiment included the determination of the participant’s temporary threshold shift (TTS) of vibrotactile perception threshold (VPT) at the tip of the index finger. The experimental hypothesis was that the vibration measurement values on the tool handle, in accordance with the ISO 5349-1 standard, include the effect of posture on the vibration measurements obtained despite the variation in posture and test participants. The hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) was applied using a hand-held electric drill applied to a pre-cast concrete paving slab substrate (600 × 600 × 50 mm, 55 MPa) using a 10 mm diameter masonry drill bit (without hammer action). The tool was operated using the right hand on twelve male subjects with three working postures (n = 36). Vibration was measured in three orthogonal directions according to the international standard ISO 5349-1 procedure. Vibration magnitudes were expressed as root-mean-square (r.m.s.) acceleration, frequency-weighted using the Wh frequency weighting. Clause 4.3 states that the characterisation of the vibration exposure is assessed from the acceleration of the surface in contact with the hand as the primary quantity. The experimental results indicate that the TTS following vibration exposure is not related to the measured vibration magnitude on the tool handle. Therefore, the automatic inclusion of posture and test participant variation is not proven. The results suggest that the vibration measurement values on the tool handle do not predict the TTS after hand-transmitted vibration in varying posture across the test participants. The research concludes that tool handle vibration measurement, in accordance with ISO 5349-1, does not properly assess the potential hazard from authentic workplace tool usage conditions of varying postures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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Article
Human Response to Vehicle Vibrations and Acoustics during Transient Road Excitations
Vibration 2021, 4(2), 357-368; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration4020023 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 702
Abstract
Driving over rising and falling edges on roads and pavements, rails, manhole covers, or transverse joints can influence the driving impression regarding the driver’s perception of vibrations and acoustics. To be able to describe this, objective parameters are used to make the subjective [...] Read more.
Driving over rising and falling edges on roads and pavements, rails, manhole covers, or transverse joints can influence the driving impression regarding the driver’s perception of vibrations and acoustics. To be able to describe this, objective parameters are used to make the subjective ride comfort measurable and scalable. Previous studies have already contributed to the investigation of the subjective perception regarding the interaction of vibrations and acoustics. However, the results were individual. Aimed at improving the quality of objective analysis methods, driving maneuvers were performed in a real vehicle to investigate the interaction of vibrations and acoustics due to transient road excitations. For this purpose, a sound reproduction system was used, which could provide the acoustic environment for the driver to adapt to while driving. With this method, subjective ratings by varying vibrations and acoustics were collected and with reference to objective parameters statistically evaluated. The results showed that both tactile and audible vibrations under transient influences had no significant interactive effects on the driver’s perception. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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Article
A Generalized Index for the Assessment of Helicopter Pilot Vibration Exposure
Vibration 2021, 4(1), 133-150; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration4010012 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 942
Abstract
Helicopters are known to exhibit higher vibratory levels compared to fixed-wing aircraft. The consequences of vibrations depend on the affected helicopter component or subject. Specifically, pilots are in contact with several parts of the helicopter; vibrations can spoil the pilot-vehicle interaction. To evaluate [...] Read more.
Helicopters are known to exhibit higher vibratory levels compared to fixed-wing aircraft. The consequences of vibrations depend on the affected helicopter component or subject. Specifically, pilots are in contact with several parts of the helicopter; vibrations can spoil the pilot-vehicle interaction. To evaluate the effects of vibration exposure on pilots, comfort levels resulting from whole-body vibration are computed. However, specific body parts and organs, e.g., hands, feet, and eyes are also adversely affected, with undesirable effects on piloting quality. Therefore, a detailed assessment is necessary for a more accurate estimation of pilot vibration exposure when comparing different configurations, tracking changes during design, and determining the safety of the flight envelope. A generalized assessment is presented by considering vibrations at the seat surface, hand-grip of controls, eyes, and feet. The suggested vibration measure includes comfort, handling, feet-contact, and vision in a single formulation. It is illustrated by coupling a high-fidelity biodynamic model of the pilot to a helicopter aeroservoelastic model in a comprehensive simulation environment. Using appropriate modeling techniques, vibration exposure of helicopter pilots could be evaluated during all stages of design, to achieve a more comfortable and safer flying environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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Article
Stiffening Behavior of Supine Humans during En Route Care Transport
Vibration 2021, 4(1), 91-100; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration4010008 - 27 Jan 2021
Viewed by 749
Abstract
Previous studies of human response to whole-body vibration demonstrated nonlinear softening behaviors with increasing vibration magnitudes. Most of these studies were conducted at relatively low vibration magnitudes of less than 3 m/s2 root mean square (RMS), and not much knowledge is available [...] Read more.
Previous studies of human response to whole-body vibration demonstrated nonlinear softening behaviors with increasing vibration magnitudes. Most of these studies were conducted at relatively low vibration magnitudes of less than 3 m/s2 root mean square (RMS), and not much knowledge is available to show if this softening behavior exists when humans are exposed to higher vibration magnitudes. In this work, 26 participants were transported in a supine position inside an army medical vehicle on a road that simulated field scenarios and were exposed to input acceleration magnitudes at 0.60, 0.98, 1.32, 3.25, 5.58, and 5.90 m/s2 RMS. Motion response data were collected at the head, torso, and pelvis of the participants using inertial sensors. Transmissibility and coherence graphs were used to investigate the type of nonlinearity induced under these transport conditions. Participant responses showed softening behavior when the vibration magnitude increased from 0.60 to 0.98 to 1.32 m/s2 RMS. However, this response behavior changed to stiffening when the vibration magnitude increased to 3.25, 5.58, and 5.90 m/s2 RMS. In the stiffening range, the transmissibility of the torso transformed from two dominant peaks to a single peak, which may indicate a tonic muscle behavior. The resulting stiffening behaviors may be considered in the design of transport systems subject to rough terrains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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Article
A Method for Analyzing the Effectiveness of Vibration-Reducing Gloves Based on Vibration Power Absorption
Vibration 2021, 4(1), 16-29; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration4010002 - 25 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 870
Abstract
The effectiveness of vibration-reducing (VR) gloves is conventionally assessed based on the vibration transmissibility of the gloves. This study proposed a method for analyzing and assessing the effectiveness of VR gloves based on how gloves affect the vibration power absorption (VPA) of the [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of vibration-reducing (VR) gloves is conventionally assessed based on the vibration transmissibility of the gloves. This study proposed a method for analyzing and assessing the effectiveness of VR gloves based on how gloves affect the vibration power absorption (VPA) of the hand–arm system and its distribution. A model of the entire tool–handle–glove–hand–arm system was used to predict the VPA distributed in the glove and across the substructures of the hand–arm system. The ratio of the gloved-VPA and ungloved-VPA in each group of system substructures was calculated and used to quantify VR glove effectiveness, which was termed the VPA-based glove vibration transmissibility in this study. The VPA-based transmissibility values were compared with those determined using to-the-hand and on-the-hand methods. Three types of gloves (ordinary work glove, gel VR glove, and air bubble VR glove) were considered in the modeling analyses. This study made the following findings: the total VPA-based transmissibility spectrum exhibits some similarities with those determined using the other two methods; the VPA-based transmissibility for the wrist–forearm–elbow substructures is identical to that for the upper–arm–shoulder substructures in the model used in this study; each of them is equal to the square of the glove vibration transmissibility determined using the on-the-wrist method or on-the-upper-arm method; the other substructure-specific VPA-based transmissibility spectra exhibit some unique features; the effectiveness of a glove for reducing the overall VPA in the hand–arm system depends on the glove effectiveness for absorbing the vibration energy, which seems to be associated primarily with the glove cushioning materials; the glove may also help protect the fingers or hand by redistributing the VPA across the hand substructures; this redistribution seems to be primarily associated with the glove structural properties, especially the tightness of fit for the glove. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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Article
Difference Thresholds for the Perception of Sinusoidal Vertical Stimuli of Whole-Body Vibrations in Ranges of Amplitude and Frequency Relevant to Ride Comfort
Vibration 2020, 3(2), 116-131; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration3020010 - 03 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1163
Abstract
Minor differences in the vibration characteristics of a vehicle may greatly influence the comfort experienced by the driver. Therefore, such characteristics are significant in the process of vehicle development. In this experimental study, just-noticeable differences were determined for sinusoidal vertical whole-body vibrations at [...] Read more.
Minor differences in the vibration characteristics of a vehicle may greatly influence the comfort experienced by the driver. Therefore, such characteristics are significant in the process of vehicle development. In this experimental study, just-noticeable differences were determined for sinusoidal vertical whole-body vibrations at the frequencies 1.3 Hz and 6.0 Hz, and for the vibration amplitudes 0.2 m/s², 0.5 m/s² and 1.2 m/s². The stimulation set up was realised using a test rig constituting a seating position similar to that in a real vehicle environment. A transformed one-up-three-down method, in conjunction with a two-interval forced choice procedure, was used to determine difference thresholds, in accordance with Weber’s Law, for 14 test subjects. Median relative difference thresholds in the range of 6.7% to 11.0% were observed, and were examined for statistical significance (α < 0.05) and practical importance on amplitude and frequency, with respect to this law. The results showed a frequency-dependence at the lowest vibration amplitude and an amplitude-dependence for both frequencies from a statistical point of view. However, the amplitude-dependence at 6.0 Hz was considered as negligible for practical use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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Other

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Systematic Review
Vibration Transmission during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion: A Systematic Review
Vibration 2021, 4(2), 444-481; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vibration4020029 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 647
Abstract
Manual wheelchair (MWC) propulsion can expose the user to significant vibration. Human body exposure to certain vibrations can be detrimental to health, and a source of discomfort and fatigue. Therefore, identifying vibration exposure and key parameters influencing vibration transmissibility during MWC propulsion is [...] Read more.
Manual wheelchair (MWC) propulsion can expose the user to significant vibration. Human body exposure to certain vibrations can be detrimental to health, and a source of discomfort and fatigue. Therefore, identifying vibration exposure and key parameters influencing vibration transmissibility during MWC propulsion is crucial to protect MWC users from vibration risks. For that purpose, a systematic review using PRISMA recommendations was realized to synthesize the current knowledge regarding vibration transmissibility during MWC propulsion. The 35 retrieved articles were classified into three groups: Vibration content, parameters influencing vibration transmission, and vibration transmission modeling. The review highlighted that MWC users experience vibration in the frequency range detrimental/uncomfortable for human vibration transmission during MWC propulsion depends on many parameters and is still scarcely studied and understood. A modeling and simulation approach would be an interesting way to assist physicians in selecting the best settings for a specific user, but many works (modeling, properties identification, etc.) must be done before being effective for clinical and industrial purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Response to Vibration)
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