Special Issue "Co-infections and Superinfections in the Respiratory Tract"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Olivier Terrier
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, Lyon, France
Interests: respiratory viruses; influenza viruses; respiratory syncytial virus; virus–host interactions; co-infections; superinfections; transcriptional profiling; host-targeted approaches; drug repurposing
Dr. Justine Oliva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, Lyon, France
Interests: respiratory viruses; influenza viruses; respiratory syncytial virus; virus–host interactions; co-infections; superinfections; transcriptional profiling; host-targeted approaches; drug repurposing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acute respiratory infections, particularly pneumonia, remain one of the leading causes of death worldwide, with viruses and/or bacteria being the main culprits. The upper respiratory tract is the gateway for many different pathogenic viruses, but it is also home to commensal and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities. Microbial interactions can be numerous and complex, with antagonistic and synergistic effects and consequences involving the evolution and sometimes aggravation of respiratory diseases. Interactions between viruses and bacteria have been the subject of numerous in vitro and in vivo studies, mainly focusing on synergistic interactions between influenza viruses and specific bacteria such as S. pneumoniae or S. aureus. However, much remains to be discovered in this field today.

This Special Issue proposes to bring together reviews and studies that are more broadly devoted to microbial interactions in the respiratory tract, whether between different viruses, between bacteria, or between bacteria and viruses. The aim is to bring together various studies, focusing on viral, viral/bacterial co-infections, or superinfections using different approaches and experimental models. Other areas of interest include studies on the host response, biomarker identification, and the development of therapeutic strategies.

Dr. Olivier Terrier
Dr. Justine Oliva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • respiratory viruses
  • influenza viruses
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • virus–host interactions
  • co-infections
  • superinfections
  • pathogenic bacteria
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Transient Neutropenia in Immunocompetent Infants with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection
Viruses 2021, 13(2), 301; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13020301 - 15 Feb 2021
Viewed by 391
Abstract
The incidence of neutropenia and the association between neutropenia and severity of respiratory symptoms among infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections remain to be elucidated. This single-center, retrospective study included immunocompetent infants (<10 months old) with laboratory-confirmed RSV infection admitted to our [...] Read more.
The incidence of neutropenia and the association between neutropenia and severity of respiratory symptoms among infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections remain to be elucidated. This single-center, retrospective study included immunocompetent infants (<10 months old) with laboratory-confirmed RSV infection admitted to our center between January 2012 and December 2019. Incidence of neutropenia (<1.0 × 109/L) within 10 days of onset and risk factors associated with subsequent neutropenia were evaluated. Among the 292 infants with RSV infection, including 232 (79%) with mild infection, neutropenia was observed in 31 (11%), with severe neutropenia (<0.5 × 109/L) in 3 (1.0%). No neutropenic infants developed serious infection or hematological disorder. Infants without neutropenia showed age <3 months at onset in 34%, C-reactive protein level <1.0 mg/L in 27%, and nasopharyngeal microbiota composition with any of Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Haemophilus influenzae in 63%. In comparison, infants with neutropenia showed age <3 months at onset in 74% (relative risk [RR] 2.15; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65–2.81), C-reactive protein level <1.0 mg/L in 55% (RR 2.02; 95% CI 1.38–2.94), and microbiota including Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Haemophilus influenzae in 15% (RR 0.24; 95% CI 0.10–0.61). Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that younger age at onset and absence of that nasopharyngeal microbiota profile were associated with development of neutropenia. In conclusion, age and airway microbiota are considered as risk factors for the development of transient neutropenia among infants with RSV infection. However, the neutropenia seems not to develop serious infection or hematological disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Co-infections and Superinfections in the Respiratory Tract)
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