Special Issue "SARS-CoV-2 Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Elmostafa Bahraoui
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INSERM, U1043, CPTP, CHU purpan, Toulouse, France
CNRS, U5282 CPTP, CHU purpan, Toulouse, France
Université Paul Sabatier, CPTP, CHU purpan, Toulouse, France
Interests: RNA viruses; viral tropism; innate immune response; inflammatory responses; glycosylation; viral signaling; emerging viruses; vaccine development
Dr. Remi Planes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IPBS, CNRS-Université Toulouse III, CNRS Toulouse, France
Interests: RNA viruses; innate immune sensing; viral signaling; cell autonomous immunity; inflammatory response; antiviral restriction; cell death; inflammasomes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the present issue, we will focus on studies aiming at:

- Innate immune response against coronaviruses, also including ssRNA viruses belonging to other families of viruses, PRR and PAMPS identification, inflammatory response and its regulation, and virus escape strategies.

- Adaptive immune responses for vaccines development against anti-SARS-CoV-2 and new strategies for vaccine development.

- Tropism of coronaviruses, including the role of glycosylation.

- Biochemical, structural and functional characterization of SARS-CoV-2 gene products.

Prof. Dr. Elmostafa Bahraoui
Dr. Remi Planes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coronavirus
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • ssRNA viruses
  • innate immune responses
  • PRRs
  • PAMPs
  • tropism
  • vaccines
  • adaptive immune responses
  • inflammatory responses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Dynamic Assay for Profiling Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies and Their ACE2/Spike RBD Neutralization Capacity
Viruses 2021, 13(7), 1371; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13071371 - 15 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Serological assays have been widely employed during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to measure antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and to track seroconversion in populations. However, currently available assays do not allow determination of neutralization capacity within [...] Read more.
Serological assays have been widely employed during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to measure antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and to track seroconversion in populations. However, currently available assays do not allow determination of neutralization capacity within the assay protocol. Furthermore, commercial serology assays have a high buy-in cost that is inaccessible for many research groups. We have replicated the serological enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibody isotypes, developed at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York. Additionally, we have modified the protocol to include a neutralization assay with only a minor modification to this protocol. We used this assay to screen local COVID-19 patient sera (n = 91) and pre-COVID-19 control sera (n = 103), and obtained approximate parity with approved commercial anti-nucleoprotein-based assays with these sera. Furthermore, data from our neutralization assay closely aligns with that generated using a spike-based pseudovirus infection model when a subset of patient sera was analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses)
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Review

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Review
An Update on Innate Immune Responses during SARS-CoV-2 Infection
Viruses 2021, 13(10), 2060; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13102060 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 253
Abstract
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a member of the Coronaviridae family, which is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic followed by unprecedented global societal and economic disruptive impact. The innate immune system is the body’s first line of defense against [...] Read more.
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a member of the Coronaviridae family, which is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic followed by unprecedented global societal and economic disruptive impact. The innate immune system is the body’s first line of defense against invading pathogens and is induced by a variety of cellular receptors that sense viral components. However, various strategies are exploited by SARS-CoV-2 to disrupt the antiviral innate immune responses. Innate immune dysfunction is characterized by the weak generation of type I interferons (IFNs) and the hypersecretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to mortality and organ injury in patients with COVID-19. This review summarizes the existing understanding of the mutual effects between SARS-CoV-2 and the type I IFN (IFN-α/β) responses, emphasizing the relationship between host innate immune signaling and viral proteases with an insight on tackling potential therapeutic targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses)
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