Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Cereal Virus Diseases in Asia and European Countries"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Viruses of Plants, Fungi and Protozoa".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Xifeng Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China
Interests: cereal virus diseases; viral diagnostics; transmission; control
Prof. Dr. Anders Kvarnheden
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala BioCtr, POB 7080, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: cereal virus diseases; viral diagnostics; transmission; control
Prof. Dr. Carl Spetz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy (NIBIO), Hoegskoleveien 7, 1432 Ås, Norway
Interests: cereal virus diseases; viral diagnostics; transmission; control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cereals are dominant staple food crop grown worldwide and are among the most important crops in Asian and European countries. Cereals are affected by various viruses, which are the most difficult pathogens to control since once a viral disease has established on a field, there are no means by which it can be eradicated. Therefore, it of utmost importance to understand the biology of viruses and device methods to control viral diseases that might propose a risk for sustainable agriculture. Many countries are addressing this challenge and are making important contributions to virology research over the years. Looking for high-quality science developed in the face of unique challenges, we encourage researchers to submit articles to this Special Issue entitled “State-of-the-Art Cereal Virus Diseases in Asian and European Countries.”

This Special Issue’s goal is to publish research studies that address efforts for cereal virus diagnosis, diversity of virus population, host resistance, transmission, prevention and control in Asian and European countries. Investigations on pathogenesis of virus infection are also welcome, as well as relevant epidemiological findings. Both original manuscripts and reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Xifeng Wang
Prof. Dr. Anders Kvarnheden
Prof. Dr. Carl Spetz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cereal virus diseases
  • viral diagnosis
  • viral pathogenesis
  • host resistance
  • transmission
  • viral epidemiology
  • viral disease control

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Resistance Evaluation of Dominant Varieties against Southern Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus in Southern China
Viruses 2021, 13(8), 1501; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13081501 - 30 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a Fijivirus in the Reoviridae family, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera, WBPH), a long-distance migratory insect, and presents a serious threat to rice production in Asia. It was first discovered in China’s [...] Read more.
Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a Fijivirus in the Reoviridae family, is transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera, WBPH), a long-distance migratory insect, and presents a serious threat to rice production in Asia. It was first discovered in China’s Guangdong Province in 2001 and has been endemic in the south of China and north of Vietnam for two decades, with serious outbreaks in 2009, 2010, and 2017. In this study, we evaluated the resistance of 10 dominant rice varieties from southern China, where the virus overwinters and accumulates as a source of early spring reinfection, against this virus by artificial inoculation. The results showed that in all tested varieties there was no immune resistance, but there were differences in the infection rate, with incidence rates from 21% to 90.7%, and in symptom severity, with plant weight loss from 66.71% to 91.20% and height loss from 34.1% to 65.06%. Additionally, and valuably, the virus titer and the insect vector virus acquisition potency from diseased plants were significantly different among the varieties: an over sixfold difference was determined between resistant and susceptible varieties, and there was a positive correlation between virus accumulation and insect vector virus acquisition. The results can provide a basis for the selection of rice varieties in southern China to reduce the damage of SRBSDV in this area and to minimize the reinfection source and epidemics of the virus in other rice-growing areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Cereal Virus Diseases in Asia and European Countries)
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Article
Integrated Proteomics and Transcriptomics Analyses Reveal the Transcriptional Slippage of a Bymovirus P3N-PIPO Gene Expressed from a PVX Vector in Nicotiana benthamiana
Viruses 2021, 13(7), 1247; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13071247 - 26 Jun 2021
Viewed by 853
Abstract
P3N-PIPO (P3 N-terminal fused with Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF), the movement protein of potyviruses, is expressed as a translational fusion with the N-terminus of P3 in potyviruses. As reported in previous studies, P3N-PIPO is expressed via transcriptional slippage at a conserved G2 [...] Read more.
P3N-PIPO (P3 N-terminal fused with Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF), the movement protein of potyviruses, is expressed as a translational fusion with the N-terminus of P3 in potyviruses. As reported in previous studies, P3N-PIPO is expressed via transcriptional slippage at a conserved G2A6 slippery site in the genus Potyvirus. However, it is still unknown whether a similar expression mechanism of P3N-PIPO is used in the other genera of the family Potyviridae. Moreover, due to the extremely low expression level of P3N-PIPO in natural virus-infected plants, the peptides spanning the slippery site which provide direct evidence of the slippage at the protein level, have not been identified yet. In this study, a potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector was utilized to investigate the expression mechanism of P3N-PIPO. A high expression level of the P3N-PIPO(WT) of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, genus Potyvirus) was observed based on the PVX expression vector. For the first time, we successfully identified the peptides of P3N-PIPO spanning the slippery site by mass spectrometry. Likewise, the P3N-PIPO(WT) of wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV, genus Bymovirus) was also successfully expressed using the PVX expression vector. Integrated proteome and transcriptome analyses revealed that WYMV P3N-PIPO was expressed at the conserved G2A6 site through transcriptional slippage. Moreover, as revealed by mutagenesis analysis, Hexa-adenosine of the G2A6 site was important for the frameshift expression of P3N-PIPO in WYMV. According to our results, the PVX-based expression vector might be used as an excellent tool to study the expression mechanism of P3N-PIPO in Potyviridae. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence dissecting the expression mechanism of a bymovirus P3N-PIPO in the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Cereal Virus Diseases in Asia and European Countries)
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Article
Interplay of Rice Stripe Virus and Rice Black Streaked Dwarf Virus during Their Acquisition and Accumulation in Insect Vector
Viruses 2021, 13(6), 1121; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13061121 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 779
Abstract
Plant viruses transmitted by hemipteran vectors commonly cause losses to crop production. Rice stripe virus (RSV) and rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) are transmitted to rice plants by the same vector, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, in a persistent [...] Read more.
Plant viruses transmitted by hemipteran vectors commonly cause losses to crop production. Rice stripe virus (RSV) and rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) are transmitted to rice plants by the same vector, the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, in a persistent propagative manner. However, rarely do the respective diseases they cause occur simultaneously in a field. Here, we determined the acquisition efficiency of RSV and RBSDV when acquired in succession or simultaneously by SBPH. When RBSDV was acquired first, RSV acquisition efficiency was significantly lower than when only acquiring RSV. However, RBSDV acquisition efficiency from insects that acquired RSV first was not significantly different between the insects only acquiring RBSDV. Immunofluorescence assays showed that the acquisition of RBSDV first might inhibit RSV entry into midgut epithelial cells, but RSV did not affect RBSDV entry. SBPHs were more likely to acquire RBSDV when they were feeding on plants coinfected with the two viruses. When RBSDV was acquired before RSV, RBSDV titer was significantly higher and RSV titer first declined, then increased compared to when only acquiring RBSDV or RSV. Only 5% of the SBPHs acquired both viruses when feeding on plants coinfected with RSV and RBSDV. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between two persistent viruses when present in the same vector insect and explain why RSV and RBSDV occur in intermittent epidemics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Cereal Virus Diseases in Asia and European Countries)
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