Special Issue "Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases 2.0"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Julia A. Beatty
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Jockey Club College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences, City University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: companion animal tumour virology; virus discovery; pathogenesis of chronic viral infections; retroviruses; gammaherpesviruses; hepadnaviruses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Séverine Tasker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bristol Veterinary School, University of Bristol, Bristol BS40 5DU, UK
Linnaeus Group, Shirley, Solihull B90 4BN, UK
Interests: feline coronavirus; feline infectious peritonitis; haemoplasma infections; feline infectious disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cats are among the worlds most popular pets and safeguarding their health is a multibillion dollar global industry. Understanding the pathogenic potential of known and novel viruses capable of infecting domestic cats is important not just for feline health but also for that of the other animals, including humans, that they live alongside. The urgent need to understand the role of cats and dogs in the epidemiology of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic alone validates the place of companion animal virology in the One Health paradigm.

In this second Special Issue “Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases”, we invite submissions from researchers working across disciplines related to viruses and viral disease manifestations of domestic and non-domestic felids. Studies that develop or envisage translational applications promoting feline health are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Julia A. Beatty
Prof. Dr. Séverine Tasker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • feline
  • cat
  • virus
  • pathogenesis
  • disease

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Feline Calicivirus Virulent Systemic Disease: Clinical Epidemiology, Analysis of Viral Isolates and In Vitro Efficacy of Novel Antivirals in Australian Outbreaks
Viruses 2021, 13(10), 2040; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13102040 - 09 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Feline calicivirus (FCV) causes upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) and sporadic outbreaks of virulent systemic disease (FCV-VSD). The basis for the increased pathogenicity of FCV-VSD viruses is incompletely understood, and antivirals for FCV-VSD have yet to be developed. We investigated the clinicoepidemiology and [...] Read more.
Feline calicivirus (FCV) causes upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) and sporadic outbreaks of virulent systemic disease (FCV-VSD). The basis for the increased pathogenicity of FCV-VSD viruses is incompletely understood, and antivirals for FCV-VSD have yet to be developed. We investigated the clinicoepidemiology and viral features of three FCV-VSD outbreaks in Australia and evaluated the in vitro efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ), 2′-C-methylcytidine (2CMC) and NITD-008 against FCV-VSD viruses. Overall mortality among 23 cases of FCV-VSD was 39%. Metagenomic sequencing identified five genetically distinct FCV lineages within the three outbreaks, all seemingly evolving in situ in Australia. Notably, no mutations that clearly distinguished FCV-URTD from FCV-VSD phenotypes were identified. One FCV-URTD strain likely originated from a recombination event. Analysis of seven amino-acid residues from the hypervariable E region of the capsid in the cultured viruses did not support the contention that properties of these residues can reliably differentiate between the two pathotypes. On plaque reduction assays, dose–response inhibition of FCV-VSD was obtained with all antivirals at low micromolar concentrations; NTZ EC50, 0.4–0.6 µM, TI = 21; 2CMC EC50, 2.7–5.3 µM, TI > 18; NITD-008, 0.5 to 0.9 µM, TI > 111. Investigation of these antivirals for the treatment of FCV-VSD is warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases 2.0)
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Article
Feline Morbillivirus in Southern Italy: Epidemiology, Clinico-Pathological Features and Phylogenetic Analysis in Cats
Viruses 2021, 13(8), 1449; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13081449 - 25 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Feline morbillivirus (FeMV) was isolated for the first time in 2012 with an association with chronic kidney disease (CKD) suggested. This study aimed at investigating in cats from southern Italy FeMV prevalence and risk factors for exposure to FeMV, including the relationship with [...] Read more.
Feline morbillivirus (FeMV) was isolated for the first time in 2012 with an association with chronic kidney disease (CKD) suggested. This study aimed at investigating in cats from southern Italy FeMV prevalence and risk factors for exposure to FeMV, including the relationship with CKD; sequencing amplicons and analyzing phylogeny of PCR positive samples. Blood serum, K3EDTA blood and urine samples from 223 cats were investigated. Ten carcasses were also evaluated. FeMV RNA was detected in 2.4% (5/211) blood and 16.1% (36/223) urine samples. One carcass tested positive by qPCRFeMV from kidney, urinary bladder, and submandibular lymph nodes. Antibodies against FeMV were detected in 14.5% (28/193) cats. We followed up 27 cats (13 FeMV positive cats) and documented in some cases urine shedding after up to 360 days. Older and foundling cats and cats living in rescue catteries, were more frequently infected with FeMV. A significant correlation between FeMV and higher serum creatinine values or low urine specific gravity was found. FeMV positivity was significantly associated with retroviral infection, and the presence of some clinical signs apart from CKD clinicopathological markers. Our study highlights the possibility of a link between FeMV exposure and CKD and a general impairment of feline health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases 2.0)
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Review

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Review
Papillomaviruses in Domestic Cats
Viruses 2021, 13(8), 1664; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13081664 - 22 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Papillomaviruses (PVs) are well established to cause hyperplastic papillomas (warts) in humans and animals. In addition, due to their ability to alter cell regulation, PVs are also recognized to cause approximately 5% of human cancers and these viruses have been associated with neoplasia [...] Read more.
Papillomaviruses (PVs) are well established to cause hyperplastic papillomas (warts) in humans and animals. In addition, due to their ability to alter cell regulation, PVs are also recognized to cause approximately 5% of human cancers and these viruses have been associated with neoplasia in a number of animal species. In contrast to other domestic species, cats have traditionally been thought to less frequently develop disease due to PV infection. However, in the last 15 years, the number of viruses and the different lesions associated with PVs in cats have greatly expanded. In this review, the PV life cycle and the subsequent immune response is briefly discussed along with methods used to investigate a PV etiology of a lesion. The seven PV types that are currently known to infect cats are reviewed. The lesions that have been associated with PV infections in cats are then discussed and the review finishes with a brief discussion on the use of vaccines to prevent PV-induced disease in domestic cats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases 2.0)
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Other

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Commentary
Emerging Hepatotropic Viruses in Cats: A Brief Review
Viruses 2021, 13(6), 1162; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13061162 - 17 Jun 2021
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Abstract
The possible role of viruses in feline liver disease has long remained neglected. However, in 2018, an analogue of human hepatitis B virus was identified in cats. Moreover, antibodies for human hepatitis E have been detected consistently at various prevalence rates in cats. [...] Read more.
The possible role of viruses in feline liver disease has long remained neglected. However, in 2018, an analogue of human hepatitis B virus was identified in cats. Moreover, antibodies for human hepatitis E have been detected consistently at various prevalence rates in cats. Although the correlation between these viruses and the liver injury in cats must be clarified, hepatotropic viruses might represent an increasing risk for feline and public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feline Viruses and Viral Diseases 2.0)
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