Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Influenza Virus and Coronavirus Research in South Korea"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sang heui Seo
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea
Interests: pathogenicity and immune responses in influenza virus and coronavirus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Influenza virus is one of the major diseases affecting both humans and animals. Influenza virus is a typical zoonotic disease, i.e., one that can be transmitted from animals to humans. The occasional transmission of novel influenza viruses containing HA proteins to which humans are not immune results in a tremendous economic burden and claims thousands of human lives. To prevent human pandemics caused by influenza viruses, scientists must survey novel influenza viruses in humans and animals to characterize the mechanisms of pathogenicity in these hosts as well as to develop therapeutic methods and vaccines.

In this Special Issue, we focus on the state-of-the art research on influenza viruses in Korea. We cordially invite Korean scientists to contribute their original studies or review articles to this topic.

Dr. Sang heui Seo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Identification of Highly Conserved SARS-CoV-2 Antigenic Epitopes with Wide Coverage Using Reverse Vaccinology Approach
Viruses 2021, 13(5), 787; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13050787 - 28 Apr 2021
Viewed by 907
Abstract
One of the most effective strategies for eliminating new and emerging infectious diseases is effective immunization. The pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) warrants the need for a maximum coverage vaccine. Moreover, mutations that arise within the virus have [...] Read more.
One of the most effective strategies for eliminating new and emerging infectious diseases is effective immunization. The pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) warrants the need for a maximum coverage vaccine. Moreover, mutations that arise within the virus have a significant impact on the vaccination strategy. Here, we built a comprehensive in silico workflow pipeline to identify B-cell- and T-cell-stimulating antigens of SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins. Our in silico reverse vaccinology (RV) approach consisted of two parts: (1) analysis of the selected viral proteins based on annotated cellular location, antigenicity, allele coverage, epitope density, and mutation density and (2) analysis of the various aspects of the epitopes, including antigenicity, allele coverage, IFN-γ induction, toxicity, host homology, and site mutational density. After performing a mutation analysis based on the contemporary mutational amino acid substitutions observed in the viral variants, 13 potential epitopes were selected as subunit vaccine candidates. Despite mutational amino acid substitutions, most epitope sequences were predicted to retain immunogenicity without toxicity and host homology. Our RV approach using an in silico pipeline may potentially reduce the time required for effective vaccine development and can be applicable for vaccine development for other pathogenic diseases as well. Full article
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Article
Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Subtype H5N8 in Poultry Farms, South Korea
Viruses 2021, 13(2), 274; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/v13020274 - 10 Feb 2021
Viewed by 656
Abstract
Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), a zoonotic disease, is a major threat to humans and poultry health worldwide. In January 2014, HPAI virus subtype H5N8 first infected poultry farms in South Korea, and 393 outbreaks, overall, were reported with enormous economic damage in [...] Read more.
Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), a zoonotic disease, is a major threat to humans and poultry health worldwide. In January 2014, HPAI virus subtype H5N8 first infected poultry farms in South Korea, and 393 outbreaks, overall, were reported with enormous economic damage in the poultry industry. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of HPAI H5N8 outbreaks in poultry farms using the global and local spatiotemporal interaction analyses in the first (January to July 2014) and second (September 2014 to June 2015) outbreak waves. The space–time K-function analyses revealed significant interactions within three days and in an over-40 km space–time window between the two study periods. The excess risk attributable value (D0) was maintained despite the distance in the case of HPAI H5N8 in South Korea. Eleven spatiotemporal clusters were identified, and the results showed that the HPAI introduction was from the southwestern region, and spread to the middle region, in South Korea. This spatiotemporal interaction indicates that the HPAI epidemic in South Korea was mostly characterized by short period transmission, regardless of the distance. This finding supports strict control strategies such as preemptive depopulation, and poultry movement tracking. Further studies are needed to understand HPAI disease transmission patterns. Full article
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